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Tribute To A 1977 Aston Martin V8: Video

Tribute To A 1977 Aston Martin V8: Video

Ask a modern-day teenager about what car he would like to own and the answer will most likely include names such as the Ferrari LaFerrari and the McLaren P1. And 10 years ago it would’ve have probably been the Bugatti Veyron and the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren. But as this new video from Petrolicious comes to prove, not all teenagers are hooked on outrageous hypercars. Paul Kitchen, one of the two main characters of this footage, started his life as a car owner by driving a 1977 Aston Martin V8. Not as much as driving as having it towed, but he enjoyed some wheel time until the car, which wasn’t in its best shape to begin with, caught fire one day.

As the years passed, Paul and his gearhead dad, Jonathan, restored the V8 to its original condition, while changing its color from purple to silver and dressing the interior in red leather, as to resemble an example he saw (and couldn’t afford at the time) at a dealership. There’s no doubt classic Aston Martins are as cool as they get, but what makes this video that much more interesting is the father-son experience this GT has helped create. Having something to work together on and ultimately sharing a passion for Astons is what makes Paul and Jonathan’s one happy family.

For the uninitiated, the V8 was introduced in 1969 as a replacement for the Aston Martin DBS. Production lasted until 1989, when Aston Martin launched the Virage. Hit play for more info and a touching father-son story.

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Zombie Special: Five Cars That Should Stay Dead

Zombie Special: Five Cars That Should Stay Dead

Well, it’s that time of year where scary things happen; when the supposed dead rise and walk among us; when spooky things lurk just beyond the shadows; watching and waiting. Yes, it’s Halloween and there are plenty of frightening relics oxidizing away in your neighborhood junkyard just waiting for a chance to come back from the dead.

The TopSpeed staffers have put together our five worst nightmares of automotive resurrection in the list below. It contains vehicles that should have never been made and whose rightful place is deep inside the bowels of the crusher.

These are vehicles that are both terrible in their mere existence and terrible in the negative ramifications that would befall their respective makers for constructing such fiends. These are vehicles that, if they were people turned zombies, Rick Grimes of The Walking Dead wouldn’t hesitate to exterminate with his .357 Colt Python.

So hold on tight, grab a weapon, and fight your way through our list of cars we’d hate to see become the undead.

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1953 - 1959 Aston Martin DB3S

1953 - 1959 Aston Martin DB3S

Launched in 1951, the DB3 was never the successful race car Aston Martin hoped it would be. It was powered by a Lagonda straight-6 engine with 133 HP, which only proved to be very unsuccessful, but that was partly rectified in 1952 when Aston Martin replaced the 2.6 liter engine with a larger one: a 2.9 liter with 153 HP. These changes didn’t drastically improve the DB3, but it improved by placing 2nd, 3rd, and 4th at Silverstone in May 1952 and was then forced out of Le Mans.

After that, Aston Martin had to take some serious measures to save the failing race car. They asked designer A.G. Watson for some assistance and the following year - in 1953 - the company came up with a new prototype in Charterhill, UK. This new version was called the DB3S and featured a lighter chassis with a reduced wheelbase and a few other modifications that helped it be more successful on the race track.

The new DBS3 stayed in production until 1956 during which Aston Martin produced a total of 31 units: 11 work cars - that have never been raced - and 20 cars being sold for customer use.

Hit the jump to read more about the Aston Martin DB3S.

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1963 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Volante by Icon

1963 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Volante by Icon

Icon has recently received a fair amount of press due to its legal issues with Mattel, but they are also still hot on the path of building awesome custom cars. On deck for Icon is a car that is a little bit out of their norm, which is building bad-ass off-road machines. It is a modernized version of the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Volante.

The project appears to be still in its concept phase, so all of the details are a little scarce and we have reached out to Icon for additional information. For now, we do know that this model will boast a strikingly similar body as the 1960s Aston Martin legend, but in true Icon fashion there will be loads of customization. First on the list of customizations will be to hack off the DB4’s annoying fixed head, and the signature Zagatto dual humps, but leaving the humps on the rear of the car, which you can see in the above image.

The next Iconization will be replacing the 3.7-liter in-line six-cylinder engine that the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato originally featured and replacing it with a modern day V-12 engine from an Aston Martin V12 Vantage. Given Icon has a shoehorn large enough to cram this 6.0-liter V-12 power plant into the DB4’s engine compartment, it will give this classic ride somewhere in the range of 510 horsepower and 420 pound-feet of torque. That’s enough to give any car nut that warm and fuzzy feeling.

To make sure that this reborn DB4 GT Zagato stays as true to original form as possible, Icon is working closely with Ercole Spada, who just so happened to be the original designer for the Zagato coupe. How’s that for dedication to your craft?

We are still awaiting confirmation of these reports and actual specs from Icon, and we’ll update you and this review as soon as we receive additional information.

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1991 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Sanction II

1991 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Sanction II

The working relationship between Aston Martin and Zagato started 50 years ago when they introduced the DB4GT Zagato in October 1960. Over that span of time, this dynamic duo created some of the sleekest sports cars, leading up to the 2012 Aston Martin V12 Zagato. One of those exquisite vehicles was the DB4GT Sanction II Zagato in 1991, which will be up for auction at Bonhams’ May 19th Aston Martin sale.

The DB4 GT Zagato Sanction II is powered by a 3.6 liter straight-six engine that delivers a total of 352 HP and a peak torque of 330 lbs-ft. The model can sprint from 0 to 60 mph in just 5.5 seconds and can hit a top speed of 153 mph.

The original DB4GT Zagato was built in a limited run of 20 units, but the Sanction II Zagato was even more rare, limited to only 4 units. The reason behind this is that there were four unused chassis numbers from the original 1961 DB4GT Zagato, and in 1991, Aston Martin approved the build of these four vehicles. They were then uprated to GT specifications and sent to Zagato to get bodied like the originals.

As previously mentioned, one of these four units will be available for auction at Bonhams’ Aston Martin sale, but some lucky auction-goer will have to hand over a large check in order to take this rarity home. The DB4 GT Zagato Sanction II has been estimated at £1.2 - £1.5 million (between $1.95 - $2.4 million at the current exchange rates).

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Aston Martin DB5 wire sculpture can be had for 'only' £88,000

Aston Martin DB5 wire sculpture can be had for ’only’ £88,000

For £88,000, you can probably buy a pretty good sports car along the lines of an Audi R8 or anAston Martin V8 Vantage.

That or you can opt to make this purchase. The only problem is, while the latter is an Aston Martin, it actually doesn’t have a whole lot going for it.That being said, if you are one of those people that would shell out this much money on a work of art then this option may be the one for you.

Created by Swiss artist Dante, this DB5 sculpture is as rare as it gets - only 10 have been made - but it’s also quite a handful on the wallet. Scaled in 1:4 dimensions, Dante used a polished, piano black plinth for the base and even installed a lighting system, giving it somewhat of a sparkly glint anytime the lights are turned on. This scale model of the DB5 is scheduled to be unveiled at the Top Marques in Monaco, at which time, we’ll probably be hearing some fellow with deep pockets make what can only be described as a purchase done solely for the love of art.

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Gooding & Company auction off over $21 Million in classic cars at Pebble Beach

Gooding & Company auction off over $21 Million in classic cars at Pebble Beach

The auction house Gooding & Company did alright for themselves this past Saturday the evening before the highly anticipated Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, selling an impressive 83% of all their lots earning more than $21 Million. The star of the block was a red 1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider that sold for $2,750,000. There were also a few records set that evening, with the 1953 Aston Martin DB 2/4 Drop Head Coupe that went for $1,650,000, and the 1953 Jaguar XK120 SE Roadster that sold for $192,500. On a more technical note, the 1938 Buick Limited Series 80 Opera Brougham only set a record for pre-war Buicks at $506,000.

Aside from the record breaking Aston Martin and Ferrari’s, the crowd in attendance was eager to catch a glimpse of Lot 31, Ettore Bugatti’s own 1938 Bugatti Type 57C Special Coupe. Originally assembled as a birthday present for Le Patron, founder of the ultra exotic car company, this particular Type 57C has been deemed as one of the automaker’s most cherished creations. The factory’s workers even went to great lengths to protect the Bugatti during World War II, the fighting between that Allied Forces and the Axis Powers ended up destroying the factory in Molsheim, France.

Even after Ettore’s death in 1947, the 57C was meticulously maintained and continued to receive updates as they were developed. The car is said to be extremely unique, with a distinct engine and transmission package, upgrades to the interior and one-off coachwork that is believed to be based on the last design ever created by Ettore’s son, Jean Bugatti who died at the age of 30 in an unfortunate incident, test driving a Le Mans winning Type 57 tank-bodied race car. Making for one very interesting conversation piece.

Press release after the jump.

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