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Aston Martin DB4

Aston Martin DB4 Generations:

Aston Martin DB4 Series V Vantage

Aston Martin DB4 Series V Vantage
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The Aston Martin DB4 was launched in 1958 as a replacement for the DB Mark III (not to be confused with the DB3 race car), and built until 1963 in various body styles and engine specifications. Offered as a 2+2 coupe, two-seat coupe, and 2+2 convertible, the DB4 was produced in no fewer than five variants, named Series I (one) to V (five). Modifications for each Series model usually included revised front grilles and new headlamps and taillights, but Aston Martin also meddled with the DB4’s body, offering longer versions for increased legroom and luggage space.

One such model is the DB4 Series V, which had its wheelbase increased by 3.5 inches over the Series IV in order for the DB4 to become a grand tourer suited for longer trips. The DB4 Series V was built between September 1962 and June 1963, marking the end of the nameplate, replaced by the more iconic 1963 - 1967 Aston Martin DB5.

Produced in only 168 units (including 32 convertibles) of the total 1,210-unit run, the DB4 Series V Vantage is one of the rarest DB4s ever built, second to only the 1963 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato, a lighter, Zagato-bodied version. Making this particular coupe that much special is its Vantage specification, which means an uprated engine, and the more aerodynamic front fascia, later carried over to the DB5.

Continue reading for my full review of this special DB4.

 

Latest Aston Martin DB4 news and reviews:

Aston Martin is Cooking Up a Pair of Zagato Special Editions

Aston Martin is Cooking Up a Pair of Zagato Special Editions

One is a road-legal masterpiece while the other is a track-only monster

In line with the 100th anniversary of Zagato, Aston Martin is producing a pair of limited-run, special-edition models for the Italian coachbuilder. The models, called the DB4 GT Zagato Continuation and the DBS GT Zagato, are limited to just 19 units each. If you’re interested in buying these special edition models, Aston Martin is placing a “take-both-or-leave-them-alone” policy on both. That means you’ll have to buy both the DB4 GT Zagato Continuation and the DBS GT Zagato together. The cost of the two vehicles? Only £6 million, or roughly around $7.9 million, not counting local taxes.

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Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato Sells For $14 Million, Sets New Record

Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato Sells For $14 Million, Sets New Record

A 1962 model year Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato sold for $14.3 million, including fees, at Sotheby’s "Driven by Disruption" auction. Despite changing hands for less than originally estimated ($15 to $17 million), the coupe set an all-time auction record for both the model and for any British car.

One of only 19 examples built, the DB4GT Zagato was developed as a lighter and improved version of the DB4GT. Production spanned from 1960 to 1963, with six more chassis completed in 1991 and 2000 as "Sanction II" and "Sanction III" models.

Although powered by the same 3.7-liter, Tadek Marek inline-six as the standard DB4, the DB4GT Zagato received 74 additional horses compared to the regular coupe, hitting the streets with 314 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque. Tipping the scales at only 2,700 pounds (1,225 kg), the Zagato-bodied DB4 needed 6.1 seconds to hit 60 mph and topped out at 153 mph, figures that made it as quick as an early 1960s Ferrari.

The car in question was originally delivered to Australia, where it competed in various motorsport events. After competing successfully, chassis DB4GT/0186/R was sold to Colin Hyams, and then three years later to Alex Copland, who left it in storage for the next 20 years. In 1993, it was brought to the U.K., where it was restored and showcased at some of the world’s biggest concourse events. The car was named Best in Class at Villa d’Este in 2007 and Best of Show at the Louis Vuitton Concourse at the Hurlingham Club in 2002.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1962 Aston Martin DB4GT By Zagato

1962 Aston Martin DB4GT By Zagato

The the world of classic Aston Martins, the DB4 and DB5 command much higher prices than the models that came immediately before and after them. But, there is one variant of these that stands high above the rest, making it what is generally considered to be the most desirable and most expensive of all classic Aston Martins. That car is the DB4 GT Zagato, a factory race car built to challenge the dominance of the Ferrari 250 GT cars in sports car racing. Debuting in 1960, the DB4 GT Zagato wasn’t a sales success, even with the very modest goals set by Aston Martin, but today that just makes it more valuable.

The car was built using the very best of Aston Martin’s racing technology, and then it was lightened and made even more shapely by Zagato. Unfortunately, this combination didn’t win quite as many races as Aston would have liked, but it did make for an absolutely beautiful car — even in the context of the gorgeous cars being produced by Zagato during the ’60s. It might not have the association with James Bond that the DB5 has, but for serious car collectors, the DB4 GT Zagato is as good as classic Astons get.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1962 Aston Martin DB4GT By Zagato.

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Aston Martin DB4 Series V Vantage

Aston Martin DB4 Series V Vantage

The Aston Martin DB4 was launched in 1958 as a replacement for the DB Mark III (not to be confused with the DB3 race car), and built until 1963 in various body styles and engine specifications. Offered as a 2+2 coupe, two-seat coupe, and 2+2 convertible, the DB4 was produced in no fewer than five variants, named Series I (one) to V (five). Modifications for each Series model usually included revised front grilles and new headlamps and taillights, but Aston Martin also meddled with the DB4’s body, offering longer versions for increased legroom and luggage space.

One such model is the DB4 Series V, which had its wheelbase increased by 3.5 inches over the Series IV in order for the DB4 to become a grand tourer suited for longer trips. The DB4 Series V was built between September 1962 and June 1963, marking the end of the nameplate, replaced by the more iconic 1963 - 1967 Aston Martin DB5.

Produced in only 168 units (including 32 convertibles) of the total 1,210-unit run, the DB4 Series V Vantage is one of the rarest DB4s ever built, second to only the 1963 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato, a lighter, Zagato-bodied version. Making this particular coupe that much special is its Vantage specification, which means an uprated engine, and the more aerodynamic front fascia, later carried over to the DB5.

Continue reading for my full review of this special DB4.

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1958 - 1963 Aston Martin DB4

1958 - 1963 Aston Martin DB4

Several high-end automakers have recently come to realize that it’s good for the brand to have the older cars they’ve made in good condition and selling for insane amounts of money. The high prices commanded by Ferrari 250s are arguably better for sales than all of that money that they dump into Formula 1 racing. So just as Ferrari has Ferrari Classiche, a division of the company devoted to restoration and maintenance of classic Ferraris, Aston Martin now has Aston Martin Heritage. And this division has rolled out a special program just for the DB4, the grand tourer built from 1958 to 1963.

The program is extensive, and Aston Martin certificates of authenticity will definitely help give the cars a boost in value. And with a car like the DB4, a good restoration can mean hundreds of thousands of dollars difference in the price it gets when sold. Because although the DB5 might be more famous, the DB4 was was a bigger leap forward for the company, and since the cars are equally rare, they tend to sell for equally huge amounts of money.

Continue reading to learn more about the Aston Martin DB4.

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Peter Ustinov's 1962 Aston Martin DB4 Convertible Sold For $2 Million

Peter Ustinov’s 1962 Aston Martin DB4 Convertible Sold For $2 Million

The DB5 may be one of the most popular Aston Martins, due to its career as James Bond’s personal car, but its predecessor, the DB4, is nothing to sneeze at. It was one of the most beautiful grand tourers back in its heyday and it has evolved into a sought-after classic that commands impressive sums at auctions. The latest DB4 to change owners for a price higher than a modern supercar’s is a Series IV Vantage Convertible built in 1962, only a year before the DB4 was replaced by the DB5. The drop-top sold for £1.5 million (about $2.3 million) at a recent Bonhams sale, making it one of the most expensive DB4s in history.

If you’re wondering what makes this DB4 special, I have three facts for you. First, it’s one of only nine DB4 Series IV Convertibles ever made. Second, it was built in the rare Vantage specification, which came with a more powerful engine. Third, and probably more important to collectors, it was originally owned by Sir Peter Ustinov, the English actor and filmmaker that won the Grammy, the Golden Globe, and the Academy Award, among many others.

This ultra-rare DB4 was delivered to him at the Montreux Palace Hotel in Switzerland in July 1962 with left-hand drive. It was equipped with red Connolly hide trim, overdrive, chrome wire wheels and a detachable hardtop. Initially finished in Desert White, its exterior was repainted Royal Claret in 1979. The DB4 was also owned by famous racing driver David Piper in the 1980s.

Continue reading for the full story.

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New Zealand Man is Printing Himself a Replica Aston Martin DB4

New Zealand Man is Printing Himself a Replica Aston Martin DB4

"The Gutenberg Bible" - this name may not say much to you, but it was the first major book printed back in 1455 using a movable metal type by Johannes Gutenberg. Needless to say that things evolved greatly since then, so that in 1840 people were already trying to print the first color photography. What happened from that point up to today, we are pretty sure you all know, but we need to highlight 2012, which is when the first domestic 3D printer captured the attention of the world.

Up to this point, the most interesting 3D printing was a a working plastic gun that folks with a 3D printer could download and print. Next year something even cooler will happen, as NASA will use a 3D printer in space to print components, tools and equipment on demand.

But how about a 3D printed car? We are not talking about an ordinary car or some cruddy small-scale model, but a full-size replica of a 1961 Aston Martin DB4. The idea belongs to New Zealand enthusiast Ivan Sentch who bought a $499 Solidoodle 3D printer and started to work on this project in December 2012.

Of course this is a time consuming process and it will be quite a while before his 3D DB4 will be ready, but we are really interested to see how the final car will look like. To date, he has about 72 percent of the pieces printed and a little over half of them put together, so we may be in for a long wait...

Click past the jump to read more about the Aston Martin DB4.

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1960 Aston Martin DB4GT 'Jet' Coupé by Bertone

1960 Aston Martin DB4GT ’Jet’ Coupé by Bertone

The recent record-breaking sale of this one-off 1960 Aston Martin DB4 GT Jet by Bertone shows the remarkable passion surrounding the brand’s classic cars, especially those with a unique or special racing history.

What’s so special about this car, aside from its rare provenance and Aston Martin Works Service restoration? Quite a few things about the DB4 GT were celebrated at the time, notably its potent top-end performance, great handling and the aircraft-style leather interior. The DB4 GT’s platform chassis replaced the DB4’s spaceframe, meaning new bodywork was required because the original Touring-designed panels weren’t compatible with the newly-developed floorplan and a chopped wheelbase.

Let’s get the money question out of the way. Yes, the Bertone Jet is more than ten times what a base DB4 is worth, but the final price was near the top end of the pre-sale estimate – so this was no surprise in the Aston community. All signs were good ahead of the sale: custom Bertone – pronounced “Bear Tony” - exterior and interior; the car’s unique nature; and the fact that it changed hands at the original chassis factory with full manufacturer blessing.

So is it a collector’s item? Without a doubt.

The current craze for the similar Ferrari 250 GT and Jaguar E-type heaves most of the dollars on convertibles – making them among the most valuable cars of all time. The 250 GT’s auction magic is greatly enhanced by the fact that the car is a total joy to drive. Is the Bertone Jet a stunning drive as well?

Click past the jump for the full review of the DB4 GT Jet.

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Unique Aston Martin DB4GT auctioned for $4,9 million

Unique Aston Martin DB4GT auctioned for $4,9 million

Things went pretty great for Aston Martin during this weekend: next to unveiling the CC100 Speedster, the company also obtained a record auction price for a unique DB4GT. The car was part of the Aston Martin Centenary Sale at Aston Martin Works on 18 May 2013, which totaled a record total of over £10 million (more than $15 million), with every lot sold.

The DB4GT was auctioned for an impressive amount of £3,249,500 (a little over $4.9 million) - the highest ever price paid for an Aston Martin at auction.

However, this is not a regular DB4GT: it is nicknamed "The Jet" and was the last DB4GT to be built. The model is a one-off edition and has been designed by the Italian design house Bertone. The model was unveiled at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show.

This unique DB4GT won a total of 12 awards, including first in class at Pebble Beach and the Hurlingham Club, and best in show at Villa d’Este.

Click past the jump to read more about the Aston Martin DB4GT.

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1963 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Volante by Icon

1963 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Volante by Icon

Icon has recently received a fair amount of press due to its legal issues with Mattel, but they are also still hot on the path of building awesome custom cars. On deck for Icon is a car that is a little bit out of their norm, which is building bad-ass off-road machines. It is a modernized version of the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Volante.

The project appears to be still in its concept phase, so all of the details are a little scarce and we have reached out to Icon for additional information. For now, we do know that this model will boast a strikingly similar body as the 1960s Aston Martin legend, but in true Icon fashion there will be loads of customization. First on the list of customizations will be to hack off the DB4’s annoying fixed head, and the signature Zagatto dual humps, but leaving the humps on the rear of the car, which you can see in the above image.

The next Iconization will be replacing the 3.7-liter in-line six-cylinder engine that the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato originally featured and replacing it with a modern day V-12 engine from an Aston Martin V12 Vantage. Given Icon has a shoehorn large enough to cram this 6.0-liter V-12 power plant into the DB4’s engine compartment, it will give this classic ride somewhere in the range of 510 horsepower and 420 pound-feet of torque. That’s enough to give any car nut that warm and fuzzy feeling.

To make sure that this reborn DB4 GT Zagato stays as true to original form as possible, Icon is working closely with Ercole Spada, who just so happened to be the original designer for the Zagato coupe. How’s that for dedication to your craft?

We are still awaiting confirmation of these reports and actual specs from Icon, and we’ll update you and this review as soon as we receive additional information.

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1991 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Sanction II

1991 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Sanction II

The working relationship between Aston Martin and Zagato started 50 years ago when they introduced the DB4GT Zagato in October 1960. Over that span of time, this dynamic duo created some of the sleekest sports cars, leading up to the 2012 Aston Martin V12 Zagato. One of those exquisite vehicles was the DB4GT Sanction II Zagato in 1991, which will be up for auction at Bonhams’ May 19th Aston Martin sale.

The DB4 GT Zagato Sanction II is powered by a 3.6 liter straight-six engine that delivers a total of 352 HP and a peak torque of 330 lbs-ft. The model can sprint from 0 to 60 mph in just 5.5 seconds and can hit a top speed of 153 mph.

The original DB4GT Zagato was built in a limited run of 20 units, but the Sanction II Zagato was even more rare, limited to only 4 units. The reason behind this is that there were four unused chassis numbers from the original 1961 DB4GT Zagato, and in 1991, Aston Martin approved the build of these four vehicles. They were then uprated to GT specifications and sent to Zagato to get bodied like the originals.

As previously mentioned, one of these four units will be available for auction at Bonhams’ Aston Martin sale, but some lucky auction-goer will have to hand over a large check in order to take this rarity home. The DB4 GT Zagato Sanction II has been estimated at £1.2 - £1.5 million (between $1.95 - $2.4 million at the current exchange rates).

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