Cars Bloodhound SSC

2014 Bloodhound SSC

2014 Bloodhound SSC High Resolution Exterior
- image 557276
  • Bloodhound SSC
  • Year:
    2014
  • Model:
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    130000
  • 0-60 time:
    1 sec. (Est.)
  • Top Speed:
    1050 mph
  • Price:
    1000000
  • Price:
  • car segment:
  • body style:

17 years ago, a team of British enthusiasts came to the Black Rock Desert in Nevada to set a new land speed record. The group was led by famed Scottish entrepreneur Richard Noble and had the jet-propelled, Thrust SSC car at its disposal. The attempt was not only successful, but it also became the first to officially break the sound barrier at 763.035 mph.

The benchmark remained untouchable to this day, but that could change in 2016, when Noble’s team will try to take the supersonic record into 1,000-mph territory with a brand-new vehicle. That car goes by the name of Bloodhound SSC and comes to prove that jet power, rocket power and a more conventional V-8 engine can work together under the same roof.

Much like the Thrust SSC, the Bloodhound SSC is being built using advanced, aerospace construction techniques, acres of carbon fiber and titanium, and a bevy of state-of-the-art technology.

Why are we reviewing a supersonic car you may ask? Well, the Bloodhound SSC might very well preview some of the technologies we will find in the road-going vehicles of the future. But most importantly, this land rocket is tuned to reach mind-boggling speeds by means of 130,000 horsepower!

Updated 09/25/2015: After years of working and development, the new Bloodhound SSC supercar was finally unveiled in its final shape. The car is expected to make a first appearance in Newquay, UK next year when it will make an initial 200-mph test run, and after that in August 2016 it will go to the South African desert where it will try to break the current land speed record of 763 mph. Then, in 2017 the SSC will finally attempt to hit the 1,000 mph mark.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Bloodhound SSC.

26 photos / 3 videos

Latest Bloodhound SSC news and reviews:

Bloodhound SSC To Make First Speed Record Attempt in 2019

Bloodhound SSC To Make First Speed Record Attempt in 2019

Going for 1,000 mph in 2020!

It’s been a long, arduous journey so far, with numerous setbacks along the way, but it’s looking like the Bloodhound SSC jet/rocket car will finally get to show what it’s made of next year.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Bloodhound Project Saved By Geely

Bloodhound Project Saved By Geely

Land speed record attempt is a go after much-needed cash boost

In case you were unaware, the Bloodhound SSC is a British-made supersonic land speed record vehicle designed to reach a top speed of 1,000 mph. The project has been in development since 2008, but ran into financial problems recently that sidelined the vehicle’s construction. Luckily, it was just announced that Geely, China’s largest privately owned auto group, has stepped in to help the Bloodhound Project move forward with some much-needed monetary assistance.

Geely and the Bloodhound Project signed the new three-year deal back in August, making Geely the project’s primary automotive sponsor. In addition to contributing funds, the Chinese company has also pledged design and engineering support, additional chase vehicles, project promotion throughout Asia, and educational efforts in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in classrooms around the world. It’s the biggest deal in the Bloodhound Project’s history.

With Geely’s support now secured, the Bloodhound SSC will attempt to break the current land speed record with an 800-mph run in 2017. If all goes according to plan, the team will shoot for 1,000 mph in 2018.

Other project supporters include Rolls-Royce, Castrol, Rolex, Lockheed Martin, and Jaguar.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Bloodhound SSC's Date With Destiny Set For October 2017

Bloodhound SSC’s Date With Destiny Set For October 2017

Years in the making, the Bloodhound SSC is now in the final stages of preparations ahead of its goal to break the world land speed record

The Bloodhound SSC’s attempt to break the world land speed record is now in the homestretch. The car is being prepared to finally make the attempt at the Hakskeen Pan in South Africa sometime in October 2017. This comes after the project was announced two years ago and a year after the car was first unveiled to the public.

It’s a landmark moment for everyone involved in the project and it probably wouldn’t have reached this point without the infusion of sufficient funding to get the car ready for its date with destiny. Fortunately for all parties concerned, the finances are now in place to complete the car as it attempts to break what will then be the 20th anniversary of the record set by Andy Green back in October 1997 when he went supersonic in the Thrust SSC on his way to clocking a top speed of 763.035 mph.

The record still stands to this day, but all signs seem to point to the 44.3-foot streamliner setting a new record as the team behind the project is confident that it will break 800 mph. In a nice bit of irony, Andy Green has been tapped to man the wheel of the SSC when it makes its record attempt. Basically, Green will be driving to break his own 20-year record in the process.

In the meantime, Bloodhound engineers will be working on the car to get it up to record-breaking standards. With the funding now in place, engineers will have a full year to make the necessary preparations, including disassembling the streamliner and documenting the process in great detail. This will be done to create a user manual, which will eventually be used as a guide when the time comes that the car needs to be pieced together for its record-breaking run.

The streamliner will also undergo tests with its power sources – the EJ220 and Nammo rocket systems – in place at the Newquay Aerohub. Once it’s determined that the SSC is fit for use, Bloodhound will begin testing the vehicle under its own power in June 2017 at speeds of 220 mph, or the equivalent of a crawl by the streamliner’s standards.

When that’s done, the car will then be airlifted to South Africa for it’s eventual date with destiny.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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2014 Bloodhound SSC

2014 Bloodhound SSC

17 years ago, a team of British enthusiasts came to the Black Rock Desert in Nevada to set a new land speed record. The group was led by famed Scottish entrepreneur Richard Noble and had the jet-propelled, Thrust SSC car at its disposal. The attempt was not only successful, but it also became the first to officially break the sound barrier at 763.035 mph.

The benchmark remained untouchable to this day, but that could change in 2016, when Noble’s team will try to take the supersonic record into 1,000-mph territory with a brand-new vehicle. That car goes by the name of Bloodhound SSC and comes to prove that jet power, rocket power and a more conventional V-8 engine can work together under the same roof.

Much like the Thrust SSC, the Bloodhound SSC is being built using advanced, aerospace construction techniques, acres of carbon fiber and titanium, and a bevy of state-of-the-art technology.

Why are we reviewing a supersonic car you may ask? Well, the Bloodhound SSC might very well preview some of the technologies we will find in the road-going vehicles of the future. But most importantly, this land rocket is tuned to reach mind-boggling speeds by means of 130,000 horsepower!

Updated 09/25/2015: After years of working and development, the new Bloodhound SSC supercar was finally unveiled in its final shape. The car is expected to make a first appearance in Newquay, UK next year when it will make an initial 200-mph test run, and after that in August 2016 it will go to the South African desert where it will try to break the current land speed record of 763 mph. Then, in 2017 the SSC will finally attempt to hit the 1,000 mph mark.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Bloodhound SSC.

Read more
Cooling Challenges For The Bloodhound SSC's Engine

Cooling Challenges For The Bloodhound SSC’s Engine

With 1,000 liters of High Test Peroxide onboard to power its rocket engine, the 1,000-mph, 2014 Bloodhound SSC could become a bomb if temperatures within its tightly packed fuselage get too high. Each liter of HTP has roughly the same explosive force as a stick of dynamite when it starts to decompose at 40°C (just 104°F). That means cooling the system is not only hugely important, but also massively challenging, when you consider that ambient temperatures routinely hit 100°F at the Hakseen Pan in South Africa where the Bloodhound SSC’s initial trials will begin. The fact that the supercharged Jaguar V-8 — which pumps 900 liters of HTP to the engine in just 20 seconds — is situated right next to the HTP tank further complicates matters. Oh, and temperatures inside the hybrid rocket engine will hit 3,000°C.

To solve the heat problems, Bloodhound SSC engineers have sourced some innovative insulating coatings from a company called Zircotec. The Jaguar exhaust has been coated with a substance called Thermohold, which is plasma sprayed on to surfaces at twice the speed of sound (Did they hear a bunch of tiny sonic booms?), and reduces surface temperatures by 30 percent.

In the past, most land-speed-record car bodies have been made of steel or aluminum instead of carbon fiber, which melts at much lower temperatures, but that’s not the case with Bloodhound SSC. To prevent both its jet and rocket engine from turning it into a steaming puddle of plastic, its carbon body panels have been coated with Thermohold for Composites, which is sprayed on at 10,000°C (about 18,000°F) in a way that doesn’t damage the panels and lowers temperatures by about 100°C (over 200°F). Zircotec has also supplied special heat shields, called Zircoflex, which are flexible, adhesive panels just 0.3 mm thick and can withstand temperatures up to 500°C.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Bloodhound SSC Will Be Unveiled On November 17

Bloodhound SSC Will Be Unveiled On November 17

The folks behind the 2014 Bloodhound SuperSonic Car (SSC) have announced that the rocket- and jet-powered ground-bound missile they’ve concocted will make its official world debut this November with a trial run at Newquay Aerohub in Cornwall, England. The British team will run the car up to 200 mph in preparation for high-speed testing next year, with the ultimate goal of setting a new world land speed record at an anticipated velocity of 1,000 mph.

After its debut in Cornwall, the car will be fitted with airbrakes and winglets and moved to Haskeen Pan, South Africa, for testing. There, the car will eventually make its record-setting attempt on a recently cleared track that’s 12 miles long and 2 miles wide. A forward party will be deployed next spring to help prepare the team’s desert base.

So far, it’s reported that development and construction is progressing well. The Bloodhound team says that the car’s titanium floor has been fitted, its 2-meter- (6.7-foot-) high tail fin is nearly finished, and its carbon-fiber monocoque is painted to aerospace standards. Further details on the car’s configuration will be released in August when it will be shown in “highly assembled form” at the team’s technical center in Avonmouth, England.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Jaguar Bloodhound Parachute Test: Video

Jaguar Bloodhound Parachute Test: Video

Jaguar is lending technical and vehicular support in an upcoming attempt to break the standing land speed record. Part of that support includes testing critical systems, such as the parachute, as seen in the above-featured video.

Making the actual record-setting run will be the rocket- and jet-powered 2014 Bloodhound SuperSonic Car (SSC), which is currently under development by an English team that aims to smash the standing record of 763.035 mph with a target velocity of at least 1,000 mph.

The Bloodhound SSC reportedly produces 135,000 thp (thrust horsepower) thanks to a Rolls-Royce Eurojet EJ200 afterburning turbofan and Nammo HTP hybrid rocket. It also has a V-8 from Jaguar Land Rover. Properly motivated, the car should be able to cover a mile in just 3.6 seconds.

To slow it down, the Bloodhound SSC uses multiple braking systems, including air brakes that create additional drag and disc brakes that are employed when the car reaches a relatively glacial 200 mph. It also has two backup parachutes.

Obviously, it’s best to make sure these things actually work before traveling at speeds over the four-digit mark, so Jaguar offered up a specially prepped F-Type R Coupe for test duties. As such, the Jag was extensively modified, by replacing the rear window and adding structural supports to attach parachute canisters directly to the chassis. A cockpit-mounted switch was used to fire the parachute at 180 mph, unleashing an instant drag force equivalent to one metric ton.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Bloodhound SSC Built In 90 Seconds: Video

Bloodhound SSC Built In 90 Seconds: Video

Bloodhound SSC is basically a 1,000 mph, land-based compendium of mind-blowing facts and figures: 135,000 horsepower, 0 to 1,000 mph in 55 seconds, a fuel pump powered by a Jaguar V8 engine, and solid aluminum wheels that spin at 10,000 rpm. If fired straight into the air, its EJ220 jet and hybrid rocket engines would take it 25,000 feet into the atmosphere. It’s far too much to list here, but read up on it when you get a chance to continue being amazed.

It’s a massively complicated project that’s been several years in the making, but as the team gets closer to starting initial trial runs later in 2015, things are quite literally beginning to come together. This new time-lapse video is a quick primer on how to build a 1,000 mph land-speed record breaking car. Here, we get to see the massive tail fin being fabricated, the fuselage taking shape, miles of wiring connecting… uh… stuff, and driver slash Royal Air Force pilot Andy Green getting comfy in the cockpit. We really can’t wait to see what this thing can do.

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Bloodhound SSC Panel Gets Shot With A 2,000 MPH Projectile: Video

Bloodhound SSC Panel Gets Shot With A 2,000 MPH Projectile: Video

Driven by a former fighter pilot and currently in the final stages of development, the Bloodhound SSC’s goal is to match or exceed 1,000 mph on the way to breaking the world land speed record. Faster by a whooping 33 percent than its predecessor, which was coincidentally also driven by Andy Green, the supersonic vehicle will need to pass a number of rigorous tests before given the go-ahead to attempt the record run.

With driver/pilot safety being a great concern at supersonic speeds, two lightweight composite panels made out of millions of woven glass fibers have been fitted on each side of the cockpit. The team behind the project recently tested the safety panels, and the best way to do it was to fire a projectile with 29 Kilojoules of energy at one. Apparently, that is the equivalent of a cricket ball smashing at the Bloodhound SSC’s side at 2,000 mph. Keep in mind that a cricket ball is slightly smaller, but much harder and heavier than a baseball.

Looking quite different than the Thrust SSC, which broke the sound barrier back in 1997, the Bloodhound SSC gets its speed from three powerplants. A jet engine from a Eurofighter Typhoon is in charge of taking it to 300 mph, after which a hybrid rocket will push the model up to its top speed. A Jaguar V-8 engine is used as an auxiliary power unit to drive the electrical system and the oxidizer pump for the rocket.

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Chris Harris Gets A Detailed Look At The Bloodhound SSC: Video

If you’ve been following development of the Bloodhound SSC, you probably have some idea of the research, development and logistics required to push a land-based vehicle beyond the 1,000 mph barrier to set a new land-speed record. Even so, you can never get enough of the staggering facts and figures behind this project: 0-1,000 mph in 55 seconds, a top speed of Mach 1.4, aluminum wheels spinning at 10,000 rpm and a combined 135,000 horsepower. If fired straight into the air, it would reach an altitude of 25,000 feet. No wonder it’s already taken nearly seven years to develop.

In his latest episode of Chris Harris on Cars, Harris decided to take a break from his normal tire wrecking, on-track antics to take a tour of the Bloodhound SSC development facility in Shirehampton, England near Bristol to see how Bloodhound is coming together. The first thing that strikes you is how massive it is, over 44 feet in length and over 9 feet tall. It’s basically a gigantic F1 tub with both jet and rocket engines lodged inside.

Andy Green is the face of the Bloodhound program. In addition to holding the current FIA land speed record of 763 mph, set in the Trust SSC in 1997, he serves as a pilot in the Royal Air Force. He was nice enough to take Harris up in his prop-powered stunt plane to simulate the G-force profile that Green would experience while setting the land speed record in Bloodhound SSC. “It makes anything you can do in a motorcar seem totally puerile and childish,” said Harris after the ride, “because it’s so much more grown-up.”

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Video: Testing the Bloodhound SSC's Wheel at Over 10,000 RPM

Video: Testing the Bloodhound SSC’s Wheel at Over 10,000 RPM

Traveling at high speeds involves some pretty scary physics. That’s why the Bloodhound SSC project has been in the works for nearly five years and involves some of the brightest engineers from around the globe. The latest video to come from the British project shows the level of testing undergone for a single part, in this case, the wheel.

See, the Bloodhound SSC is a supersonic car designed for solely for breaking the 1,000-mph speed barrier. The ‘car’ is powered by a jet engine and rockets to achieve such a fast velocity. At 1,100 mph, the Bloodhound’s 35.5-inch (902.6-mm) aluminum wheels spin at a whopping 10,429 rpm. That’s 174 rotations per second!

At that speed, the wheel’s diameter expands by 1.6 mm (0.62 inches) and its temperature starts to rise. In fact, during testing the wheel started to heat up at the rate of two degrees Fahrenheit per second due to aerodynamic friction. At its max, the wheel peaked at 204 degrees Fahrenheit, only 100 degrees shy of aluminum becoming soft.

The Bloodhound SSC team is continuing to work throughout the year with hopes of breaking the 1,100-mph land-speed at a location in South Africa.

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