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BMW recalls all the i3 models ever sold in the United States

BMW recalls all the i3 models ever sold in the United States

It’s still safe to drive them

BMW is recalling all the i3 EVs sold in the U.S., both electric and range-extended models, following results from a crash test by the National Highway Traffic Safety Association (NHTSA). The German automaker is also stopping i3 sales until it can fix the issue. The small electric car failed a front rigid barrier crash with a five-foot-tall, 110-pound female in the driver’s who is not wearing a seatbelt. According to the NHTSA, this situation produces a marginally higher risk of neck injury. The recall affects all i3 cars sold in the United States from model years 2014 through 2018, which covers the entire production run for the U.S. market.

The recall will commence in January when all owners will receive a letter to take their cars to dealerships for a fix. BMW says that customers can continue driving their i3s until then, claiming that the car remains safe when the driver wears a seat belt. "While BMW’s compliance testing showed results well below the required limits, more recent testing has shown inconsistent results," BMW said in a statement. "Consequently, BMW has issued a recall and is working with the agency to understand the differences in the test results. A remedy is forthcoming."

Granted, the recall doesn’t seem like a big deal safety-wise (you are wearing a seat belt, right?), but it didn’t happen too often for an entire nameplate to be affected and called back. It will be interesting to see what kind of fix will BMW find for a safety issue like this one.

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BMW Recalling 1 Million Cars in the U.S. over Fire Risk

BMW Recalling 1 Million Cars in the U.S. over Fire Risk

BMW has been watching the reported problems for a while now..

BMW is recalling a whopping one million vehicles in North America over two separate issues involving fire risks. Both recalls include cars produced from 2006 to the 2011 model years. One recall covers 670,000 3 Series models from 2006 to 2011 model years, while the second recall is issued for 740,000 cars from 2007 to 2011 model years. The latter includes the 128i, 3 Series, 5 Series, X3, X5, and Z4 models. Although these figures amount to more than 1.4 million units, BMW says the recalls overlap and cover about one million examples. Nearly all cars have been sold in the United States, while about 15,000 are from Canada. The recalls may expand to other countries in the future, but no specific announcement has been made as of this writing.

The first recall for the 3 Series models only will address a wiring issue for heating and air conditioning system. According to the company’s report for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the systems may overheat and could increase the risk of a fire in the car. BMW has reportedly been monitoring the issue since 2008 and has made some improvements in 2011, but some incidents from 2015 and 2016, which led to injuries, prompted a mass recall. The second recall is about a valve heater issue that may cause damage to the engine compartment. No injuries or crashes related to this problem have been reported so far. All cars involved will have their wiring harnesses and valve heaters replaced at BMW dealers, free of charge.

Continue reading for the full story.

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BMW Issues the Smallest Recall Ever; One BMW X3 Affected

BMW Issues the Smallest Recall Ever; One BMW X3 Affected

I wonder just how they managed to single out this one examaple...

Normally when we announce recalls here at TopSpeed, there’s a good reason for it. Usually, it involves something major and should be taken care of immediately. It also normally accounts for a wide range of models or, at the very least, a significant number of vehicles from one model line. Well, today things are a little different, and the sheer intriguing nature of the recall was enough to convince me to tell you all about it. So, what’s so special about this recall? Well, it only affects a single example of the 2017 BMW X3. Yes; you read that correctly, it’s a single model. More specifically, it’s a 2017 BMW X3 xDrive 28i that was manufactured on July 7, 2016.

According to the NHTSA, the vehicle in question is equipped with electronic power steering (commonly abbreviated as EPS.) Apparently, the contact pins on the EPS control unit may not have been welded correctly, which could lead to increased electrical resistance in the connection that could lead to a fire. According to the NHTSA, the risk of fire is there even when the vehicle is parked, and the ignition is turned off. As always, BMW will notify the owner and will make the repair free of charge. If the build date and specific model happens to matche your X3, you can plug in your car’s VIN here to see if you happen to be that one lucky owner.

On a side note, if you happen to be that one person with a faulty EPS unit, reach out to us here. We would love to hear your story and your experience with the dealer that rectifies the situation.

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A New Round Of Recalls Are Coming For Certain BMW M Models

A New Round Of Recalls Are Coming For Certain BMW M Models

If Your BMW M2, M3, or M4 was recalled last January, it’s likely to be recalled again

Recalls are a hassle, but when one recall leads to another recall, that’s when things get annoying. Unfortunately, that’s the predicament certain owners of the BMW M2 Coupe, M3 Sedan, M4 Coupe, and M4 Convertible are now facing after BMW North America announced a new round of recalls for 2015 to 2017 model years of the aforementioned models, all because BMW dealerships messed up on a repair involving the rear differential during a previous recall last January 2016.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), BMW dealers used the same rear sub-frame bolts to replace the rear differential on the M cars. The problem with that is that these bolts were designed to be used only as one-time-use fasteners, as per the automaker’s own vehicle assembly process. If they’re used more than once, there’s a good chance that the “clamp force may not be achieved when torquing down the bolts,” resulting in the possibility of them loosening as they wear out. When that happens, the car’s handling and control could be compromised, which could then lead to the possibility of a crash taking place.

All told, 66 units are potentially affected by the new recall, including five M2 Coupe made from May 31 to June 20, 2016; 32 M3 Sedans manufactured from June 17, 2014 to June 13, 2016; 26 M4 Coupes built from May 2, 2014 to June 14, 2016; and three M4 Convertibles assembled from May 29, 2015 to May 27, 2016. Fortunately, no incidents have been reported concerning the condition of the affected models.

It must be said though that the NHTSA has absolved BMW dealerships of any blame for the fresh round of recalls. Apparently, BMW didn’t give specific instructions to use new rear sub-frame bolts, which could’ve led to dealership engineers using the same bolts to replace the differential.

The recall is expected to begin on October 24, 2016. In the days leading up to it, BMW will be notifying affected owners and certain dealerships of the impending recall. The latter is expected to replace the affected rear sub-frame bolts with new bolts without owners incurring any costs.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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