After many years of development and several prototypes spotted on and around the Nurburgring in 2015, the new Bugatti Chiron finally broke cover at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show. Developed to replace the already iconic Veryron, the Chiron borrows many features from its predecessor, but sports design cues of its own, including a redesigned interior and a more powerful drivetrain. With Bugatti’s new hypercar already on its way to the production line, we decided to have a closer look at its roadster sibling, the Chiron Grand Sport.

If you feel a bit confused, you haven’t missed anything. Bugatti hasn’t launched the Chiron Grand Sport behind your back. In fact, the French firm has yet to make a statement about a topless Chiron, but we know such a model is in the books. Given that the Veyron spawned not one, but two roadsters, the Grand Sport and Grand Sport Vitesse, there’s no way Bugatti will build all 500 Chirons in coupe body style only. Also, it’s only natural to assume that Bugatti will continue to use the Grand Sport name with the Chiron in order to take brand’s modern legacy forward.

Having said that, expect the Chiron Grand Sport to arrive in a couple of years as a 2019 or 2020 model year supercar. Likewise, look for Bugatti to attempt to establish a new world record for the fastest production convertible with the Chiron. But until we find out more about that, check out our speculative review and rendering below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Bugatti Chiron Grand Sport.

  • 2020 Bugatti Chiron Grand Sport
  • Year:
    2020
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    W-16
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    1479
  • Torque @ RPM:
    1180
  • Displacement:
    8.0 L
  • 0-60 time:
    2.5 sec. (Est.)
  • Top Speed:
    261 mph (Est.)
  • Price:
    € 2800000
  • Price:
  • car segment:
  • body style:

Exterior

2018 Bugatti Chiron High Resolution Exterior
- image 667477

Note: 2018 Bugatti Chiron pictured here.

Needless to say, the Chiron Grand Sport’s design isn’t much of a mystery, as the roadster will share about 90 percent of its body panels with the coupe. However, the remaining 10 percent is still up for debate, mostly because it is not yet clear whether the Chiron Grand Sport will feature the same roadster configuration as the Veyron Grand Sport or receive a targa-style roof.

The benefit of such a configuration would be extra structural rigidity at high speeds, which would allow Bugatti to save a few pounds by using less chassis and body reinforcements compared to the standard roadster layout.

The targa rumor surfaced the Web in late 2015 and suggested that the standard removable top could be replaced by a T-top style roof with either one or two carbon-fiber panels. In this case, the Chiron Grand Sport would have a bar connecting the windshield to the engine hood. The benefit of such a configuration would be extra structural rigidity at high speeds, which would allow Bugatti to save a few pounds by using less chassis and body reinforcements compared to the standard roadster layout.

Whatever the configuration, the Chiron Grand Sport will have a lightweight carbon-fiber roof and a custom-built wind deflector for the windshield. As seen on the Veyron Grand Sport, this element will be stored in the front luggage compartment and attached to the windscreen frame after the top is removed. It will probably also get the umbrella-like soft-top that can be easily installed in case bad weather strikes without warning.

Another mystery is what Bugatti will do about the sweeping, C-shaped curve that defines the Chiron’s profile. Without a roof, the upper section of this remarkable styling feature will be gone. Of course, the iconic "Bugatti Line" will again adorn the car when the top is back in position, but the design itself might cause a few issues. You see, the "Bugatti Line" also acts as an aerodynamic device, optimizing airflow into the side intakes and from there into the massive W-16 engine. Cooling likely won’t be a problem here, but the Chiron might find it hard to reach its top speed without the roof. Sure, we’re not expecting the Grand Sport to hit the coupe’s 261-mph benchmark, but if the roadster fails to be faster than the Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse, which was limited at 233 mph for road use but set a 254-mph world record without the speed limiter, Bugatti will risk some bad publicity. On the other hand, the French brand has come up with lots of interesting solutions for more challenging issues in the past and we expect the same in this department as well.

Interior

2018 Bugatti Chiron High Resolution Interior
- image 667493

Note: 2018 Bugatti Chiron pictured here.

Other than unlimited headroom and maybe a few tweaks to the A- and B-pillars, expect for the Grand Sport to be identical to the standard Chiron on the inside. Look for every surface to be either carbon-fiber or aluminum, or covered in fine leather and for the design to be a significant makeover compared to the Veyron. Bugatti redesigned everything single panel and button for the Chiron, this time around using more organic lines and an overall cleaner layout. The classic instrument cluster seen in the Veyron was replaced by TFT screens that display various information and the navigation map, while the speedometer runs all the way up to 500 km/h (310 mph). There’s also a new flat-bottom steering wheel with aluminum spokes, more comfortable seats, and a premium sound-system featuring one-carat diamond membranes on its tweeters. Naturally, each Grand Sport will be customized upon the buyer’s request, meaning that you won’t see two cars that share the same upholstery colors and details.

Drivetrain

2018 Bugatti Chiron High Resolution Exterior
- image 667478

Note: 2018 Bugatti Chiron pictured here.

The Chiron Grand Sport will benefit from an extra 296 horsepower and 74 pound-feet of torque compared to the Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse and will be nearly as quick as the coupe

Under the hood, the Grand Sport will be identical to the coupe, meaning it will get its juice from the upgraded, quad-turbo, 8.0-liter W-16 generating 1,479 horsepower and 1,180 pound-feet of torque. The Chiron Grand Sport will benefit from an extra 296 horsepower and 74 pound-feet of torque compared to the Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse and will be nearly as quick as the coupe. Current estimates for the Chiron are "less than 2.5 seconds" from 0 to 62 mph, "less than 6.5" ticks to 124 mph, and "under 13.6 seconds" to 186 mph. While these figures might be about the same for the Grand Sport with the roof in place, the topless version should be about a tenth-second slower from 0 to 62 mph.

As for top speed, expect the Grand Sport to hit the Chiron’s estimated 261 mph with the top up, but look for a lower benchmark with the carbon-fiber roof removed due to weaker aerodynamics. We’d venture to say that the roadster will be able to reach 240 mph in production guise, which will make it seven mph faster than the Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse. However, the Grand Sport should be faster on the test track and without the speed limiter, especially if Bugatti wants to establish a new world record for roadsters. The Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse is the current holder at 254.04 so the Chiron Grand Sport will have to do better than that. We bet it will, but the new record won’t be far off from the old one. Our best guess is that the Chiron will only improve it by only two or three mph.

Just like the coupe, the Grand Sport will use a revised seven-speed DSG transmission and a permanent all-wheel drive system.

Prices

With pricing for the Chiron set at €2.4 million (about $2.75 million) before options, the Grand Sport will most likely fetch in excess of €2.8 million (around $3.2 million). Production will probably be limited to 200 of the total 500 Chirons set to be built over the next years.

Competition

Hennessey Venom F5

2015 Hennessey Venom F5 Exterior
- image 563024

It’s been more than a decade since the Bugatti Veyron established its first world record and only one carmaker was able to challenge it. That company is Hennessey, which managed to create one of quickest and most powerful supercars in the world starting from a Lotus Exige chassis. The car in question is the Venom GT and it almost took the Guinness World record away from the Veyron in 2014, when it crested 270.5 mph on the Kennedy Space Center’s shuttle landing strip in Florida.

But even though it was faster than the Veyron, the Venom GT did not qualify as the world’s fastest production car in the Guinness Book of Records due to the fact that the run was made in a single direction and production was under 30 units. With production of the 1,451 horsepower Venom GT coming to an end in 2016, Hennessey is replacing it with the Venom F5. Although the Texas-based shop has yet to release actual data, the F5 is expected to be faster and more powerful than the GT. Hennessey is reportedly aiming for a 290-mph top speed and a 30-unit production run, which would be just enough to satisfy Guinness’ requirement for the record

Find out more about the Venom F5 here.

Conclusion

2020 Bugatti Chiron Grand Sport Exterior Exclusive Renderings Computer Renderings and Photoshop
- image 671585

Although it is not yet confirmed for production, the Chiron Grand Sport is likely already underway as Bugatti is looking to expand its lineup beyond just one offering. It might take a while given the French firm is facing serious challenges as far as aerodynamics go, but the successor to the Veyron Grand Sport should be here in a couple of years. While the prospect of seeing yet another record-breaking supercar on public roads is as exciting as they get, we can’t help but complain about Bugatti’s lack of interest for a track-prepped supercar. The company seems to have forgotten about its roots under Volkswagen ownership and that’s not what we’d expect from a brand that made a name for itself winning races on Europe’s most iconic tracks. Hopefully this will change in the future, but Bugatti’s main priority now is to set new world records with the Chiron and upcoming Chiron Grand Sport. That’s one way to stay on top of the supercar kingdom...

  • Leave it
    • Likely heavier than the coupe
    • Almost useless at the race track
    • Very, very expensive
    • Not yet confirmed for production
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