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Only 15 Bugatti Veyrons Left To Be Built

Only 15 Bugatti Veyrons Left To Be Built

Back in 2005, Bugatti launched the Veyron, a supercar that would end up becoming one of the most important cars of this generation. It’s already 2014 and 405 of the 450 Veyrons Bugatti planned to produce already have owners. That leaves 45 more Veyrons that are still in production. Of that 45, there are 30 current Veyrons that are already accounted for. That leaves 15 Veyrons that still don’t have an owner. Yes, we’re down to the last 15 models of the most iconic supercar of this era. Once all 15 find owners, Bugatti will no longer build the Veyron.

In some ways, it’s pretty sad knowing that we can’t look forward to more of those exclusive one-off Veyrons that Bugatti releases at the most inexplicable of times. On the other hand, it also feels like the right time to say farewell to the supercar.

It’s had a tremendous run over the past nine years, highlighted by numerous record-setting achievements as the fastest production car in the world. Bugatti is also responsible for some incredibly rare Veyrons that includes the recently launched Legends series.

But all good things really do come to an end, and the Veyron isn’t an exception to that. So with 15 models left before it rides of into the sunset, here’s a toast to celebrate the legendary life of one of the most iconic modern-day supercars.

Godpseed, Bugatti Veyron. Thanks for the memories.

Click past the jump to read more about the Bugatti Veyron.

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The Art Of Bugatti Exhibit Coming to The Mullin Automotive Museum in Spring 2014

The Art Of Bugatti Exhibit Coming to The Mullin Automotive Museum in Spring 2014

The Bugatti name has long been associated with style and performance in the realms of automotive excellence, but few are aware of impact the Bugatti name made in the worlds of art and craftsmanship.

The Bugatti family began a legacy for themselves in the late 1800s that continued through many generations and lasts even still. The Mullin Automotive Museum, an institution devoted to showcasing French art and automobiles from the Art Deco era, has announced The Art of Bugatti exhibition that starts in the spring of 2014.

The museum is located roughly an hour north of Los Angeles in Oxnard, California, and it will play host to the Bugatti family collection of oil paintings, bronze sculptures, intricate furniture and, of course, some of Bugatti’s most famous cars, including the current Veyron.

Besides the Veyron, the exhibition will also host the early Brescia racecar, the race-winning Types 35s, 37, and 51; Jean Bugatti’s Type 64 Papillon and Atlantic Coupé; Types 57 Aravis and Atalante, and the Type 41 Bugatti Royale. Even more impressive is perhaps one of Bugatti’s earliest four-wheeled creations, a horse-drawn cart, complete with the iconic Bugatti logo branded on its side.

Click past the jump to see more pictures of the classic Bugatti cars and artwork

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1931 Voisin C20 MyLord Demi-Berline

1931 Voisin C20 MyLord Demi-Berline

Meet "the most important car."

We’ve covered our fair share of rare and historic classic cars here at TopSpeed, but this 1931 Voisin C20 MyLord takes the cake. Its level of beauty and class is only overshadowed by its rarity and appraised value. It is truly a gorgeous thing to behold.

Powered by an innovative sleeve-valve V-12 engine riding on an underslung chassis, the two-door coupe was built in France by automotive and aeronautics pioneer Gabriel Voisin who was more well-known for his achievements in the air than on the road. He did, however, start Avions Voisin, one of the world’s most prestigious automotive brands of the day.

The one-off MyLord was only a concept vehicle and never saw full production, making this example the only one in existence. It was treated to a full restoration before heading to the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance auction block in 2010. One fortunate bidder took home the MyLord, leaving a $2,750,000 check in its place.

Click past the jump to learn more about the Voisin C20 MyLord Demi-Berline

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1994 Bugatti EB110 GT

1994 Bugatti EB110 GT

Believe it or not, Bugatti actually had a rather long and roller-coaster-like lifespan before the Veyron was ever a glimmer in Volkswagen AG’s eyes. In fact, Bugatti outdates its ownership group by roughly 28 years, as VW was founded in 1937 and Bugatti in 1909. Unlike VW, though, Bugatti never fully recovered from WWII, and fizzled away into automotive has-been in the 1950s, despite a few ailed comebacks in the late-`50s and early `60s.

When Romano Artioli bought the rights to the Bugatti name, his first release under the newly acquired name was the extremely advanced 1991 Bugatti EB110 GT. Unfortunately, the EB110 GT, despite its advancements, never really took off, which was mostly attributed to the global recession at the time taking its toll on the automotive industry.

The EB110 GT lasted through the 1995 model year, but only a total of 84 of them were ever built within those five model years. In addition to the 84 completed models, there were 11 incomplete models that were purchased by B Engineering during Bugatti’s bankruptcy proceedings, which later became the basis for the Edonis sports car.

As you can see, the EB110 GT had a storied and tragically short life that was chock-full of unrealized potential, due to economic woes. Well, RM Auctions is giving you a chance to own a piece of Bugatti history by offering up a 1994 Bugatti EB110 GT in Monaco from May 11th to 12th, 2012.

How does this one technical marvel stand up to today’s supercars and is it really worth picking up with all of the supercars available?

Click past the jump for the answers in our complete review.

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1926 Bugatti Type 41 Royale

1926 Bugatti Type 41 Royale

The automobile was not even thirty years old when racing had taken a firm hold on enthusiasts. Enzo Ferrari was driving his performance cars to championships all over the world and others wanted in on the action. Ettore Bugatti was one of these men and he decided to take on Ferrari in a very different way than the others. He initially started with smaller, lighter, and less powerful cars than the Ferrari racecars of the time. This allowed the cars to be more nimble on the track and even finish second behind Ferrari in the Grand Prix du Mans of 1911.

This major accomplishment gave Ettore Bugatti the supporters and money necessary to continue his small operation in Molsheim. He began to produce stronger competitors and won more races every year. By 1920, Bugatti had its own Grand Prix championship under its belt and was ready to expand the company into different areas.

Ettore was a very respected man and ran his company with an iron fist, Le Patron as he was known, acted as a member of the upper crust and often invited them for factory tours and extravagant meals. According to Bugatti lore, at one of these dinners a woman remarked, “Everyone knows you build the greatest racing cars in the world. But for a town carriage of real elegance, one must go to Rolls-Royce or Daimler, isn’t that so?” This statement must have enraged Ettore, whether he showed it or not to his guests, he knew this was true. His company had been one-dimensional for many years and it was time to take some risks in the public sector. What came next is one of the most revered luxury automobiles ever made, the Royale.

Hit the jump for more details on the Bugatti Royale.

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1936 Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantic is the world's most expensive car

1936 Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantic is the world’s most expensive car

Automotive history has just been made as the 1936 Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantic has been sold by Gooding and Company to a buyer that no one would like to confirm. Of course, after a purchase price of $30-$40 million, we would think that the Mullin Automotive Museum in Oxnard, Ca. (according to a person familiar with the transaction) would be ecstatic to boast of the purchase of what is considered “the most desirable classic automobile in the world”.

The car was sold by the estate of Dr. Peter D. Williamson after the neurologist passed back in 2008. Williamson owned a spectacular collection of Bugattis that were sold during the annual car collector classic weekend in August 2008. The Atlantic, however, was part of a private sale that has been in the works for quite some time.

Hit the jump for the full story.

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1925 Bugatti Brescia pulled underwater to go up for auction

1925 Bugatti Brescia pulled underwater to go up for auction

Back in July of last year, we ran a story about an almost century-old Brescia Bugatti being discovered in the bed of the Verbano Lake in Ascona, Switzerland by a diving club that went by the name Centro sport subacquei salvataggio Ascona – or CSSS, if you’re having trouble pronouncing the whole name.

Five months later, parts of the salvaged 1922 Bugatti Brescia Type 22 Roadster have been somewhat restored to its old form and is now being auctioned off by auction house Bonhams for an expected price tag of around $100,000 to $130,000 with the proceeds stemming from the sale to go to a charity that’s involved in curbing youth violence.

While the Brescia still looks a little worse for wear, it is worth pointing out that the car would make for a great exhibit and can maybe even be used as a peg for the creation of a replica. Either way, the six-figure price tag for the artefact seems to be well justified.

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Gooding & Company auction off over $21 Million in classic cars at Pebble Beach

Gooding & Company auction off over $21 Million in classic cars at Pebble Beach

The auction house Gooding & Company did alright for themselves this past Saturday the evening before the highly anticipated Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, selling an impressive 83% of all their lots earning more than $21 Million. The star of the block was a red 1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider that sold for $2,750,000. There were also a few records set that evening, with the 1953 Aston Martin DB 2/4 Drop Head Coupe that went for $1,650,000, and the 1953 Jaguar XK120 SE Roadster that sold for $192,500. On a more technical note, the 1938 Buick Limited Series 80 Opera Brougham only set a record for pre-war Buicks at $506,000.

Aside from the record breaking Aston Martin and Ferrari’s, the crowd in attendance was eager to catch a glimpse of Lot 31, Ettore Bugatti’s own 1938 Bugatti Type 57C Special Coupe. Originally assembled as a birthday present for Le Patron, founder of the ultra exotic car company, this particular Type 57C has been deemed as one of the automaker’s most cherished creations. The factory’s workers even went to great lengths to protect the Bugatti during World War II, the fighting between that Allied Forces and the Axis Powers ended up destroying the factory in Molsheim, France.

Even after Ettore’s death in 1947, the 57C was meticulously maintained and continued to receive updates as they were developed. The car is said to be extremely unique, with a distinct engine and transmission package, upgrades to the interior and one-off coachwork that is believed to be based on the last design ever created by Ettore’s son, Jean Bugatti who died at the age of 30 in an unfortunate incident, test driving a Le Mans winning Type 57 tank-bodied race car. Making for one very interesting conversation piece.

Press release after the jump.

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Brescia Bugatti found underwater in Switzerland

Brescia Bugatti found underwater in Switzerland

There are a host of things you can find under a body of water and while they range from the absolutely meaningless to the downright priceless, the possibilities of what you can find underwater are endless.

In the Swiss city of Ascona, a diving club that goes by the name, Centro sport subacquei salvataggio Ascona (CSSS), went on a routine dive on the Verbano Lake last July 5 found something that none of them were expecting, a Brescia Bugatti.

Nobody knows how the classic car ended up 50m deep on the lake or how long it’s been there. Nevertheless, the team of divers who found it are scheduled to bring the century-old vehicle back up to dry land. Whether or not there’s still value on the submerged vehicle remains to be seen, but we’re quite sure that the question of whether it still works or not has been answered a long time ago.

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