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2020 Bugatti Galibier

2020 Bugatti Galibier

The company’s first sedan in more than 60 years is almost here!

The Bugatti 16C Galibier came to life in 2009 as a concept car. Developed as a successor of the EB 218 from 1999, which followed the EB 112 of 1993, the Galibier’s design was based on the Veyron supercar, while the engine was a significantly modified version of the 8.0-liter W-16. Originally slated for production as a modern Royale, the Galibier was eventually cancelled in 2013. Although there’s no official reason for that, it’s believed that the French firm wanted to focus on a Veyron successor, which was launched in 2016 as the Chiron. Word has it that the Galibier project is now back on Bugatti’s table, so we created a brand-new rendering to go with a speculative review.

If you’ve been following the media on the Galibier matter, the project has gone up and down numerous times. Each report that it was considered for production was followed by another one that Bugatti won’t do it weeks or months later. There still isn’t an official statement, so it’s pretty much a mystery. But it’s safe to assume that Bugatti will do it at some point, mainly because it will sell like hotcakes no matter the sticker. Declining the opportunity to make a profit with an ultra-fast and ultra-luxurious sedan would be pure madness. And, Bugatti may be mad, but in a different way. So yeah, I think that the Galibier will arrive in a few years - maybe even sooner than 2020.

Continue reading to learn more about the Bugatti Galibier.

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1933 - 1938 Bugatti 57sc Atlantic Coupe

1933 - 1938 Bugatti 57sc Atlantic Coupe

What you are looking at here is arguably the most valuable car in the world. That sort of thing is very difficult to pin down, with so few of them in existence and no post-recession sales numbers to look at, but it is generally agreed to be the most valuable car in the world. The Bugatti Type 57 SC Atlantic has, as a result, come to be seen as one of the ultimate symbols of prewar automotive elegance, more rolling statue than car, and for once that isn’t hyperbole.

I myself once saw the Atlantic belonging to Ralph Lauren on display in an actual art museum (the Cleveland Museum of Art had a whole exhibit dedicated to the Bugatti family in 1999), where it was treated the same as the sculptures on display nearby.

Of course, there are a lot of seriously beautiful prewar cars, some even more rare than the Atlantic, that aren’t nearly so valuable. It’s difficult to say just what it is that makes this one so much more valuable than the rest. There is a combination of different factors at work, and some of them defy explanation. Ultimately, it’s so valuable because someone is willing to pay whatever it takes to own it.

Continue reading to learn more about the Bugatti 57sc Atlantic Coupe.

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1938 Bugatti Type 57C Atalante

1938 Bugatti Type 57C Atalante

The Type 57 is to Bugatti what the 250 is to Ferrari. It was built in a variety of different configurations with a variety of different bodies for both the road and the race track. And like the 250, certain versions of the car are among the most valuable cars of all time. The Atlantic body style is certainly the most valuable, but the only slightly less well-known Atalante comes in second. It was designed by Ettore Bugatti’s son Jean and is named after the heroine of Greek mythology’s Atlanta.

This particular Atalante passed through a number of different hands before being bought by John Wendell Strauss, grandson to R.H. Macy and heir to the Macy’s fortune. Unfortunately, Strauss parked the Atalante in a garage in 1962 and there it sat for decades until it was discovered in 2007 when the estate was being settled. There are some photos of the car in the barn here, and as you can see, it really wasn’t in such bad shape, considering how long it had been sitting. When it was sent to be restored, it was discovered that everything was still there and all of the numbers still matched — making this one of the most original prewar Bugattis in existence.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1938 Bugatti Type 57C Atalante.

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2013 Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse Special Edition

2013 Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse Special Edition

We first heard that a special edition Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse was being built by Bugatti Beverly Hills for the Pebble Beach Concours d’ Elegance a few weeks ago. Over the weekend, we finally got to see what the car is all about.

Based on the Grand Sport Veyron Vitesse, the special edition model came dressed for the party in grand style, featuring a unique bespoke Bianco and New Light Blue color scheme that was inspired from the 1928 Bugatti Type 37A. To fit into its special edition designation, the supercar was treated to a Bianco hue on the car’s upper body, as well as on a number of the car’s components, including the air scoops and the roof area. Meanwhile, the lower part of the supercar’s body has been finished in the New Light Blue color, which also covers the side skirts, the radiator grille frame, the front spoiler, the rear apron, the rear spoiler, and the inner surfaces of the wheel rims.

As for the interior, Bugatti Beverly Hills opted for Cognac leather with matching Light Blue inserts, a two-color set-up that is just as luxurious as the supercar’s two-tone body.

No modifications were done on the supercar’s engine, which means that you can expect to receive the same 7.9-liter 16-cylinder engine of the Grand Sport Vitesse with an output of 1,200 horsepower and 1,106 lb/ft of torque. Those numbers translate to a 0-62 mph time of just 2.6 seconds with a top speed of 255 mph.

No word yet on how many of these special edition models Bugatti will build, although they did announce that the car will sell for € 1.74 million. That’s about $2.15 million based on current exchange rates.

UPDATE 08/22/2012: The engine on the one-off Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse Special Edition hadn’t even cooled from being driven onto the Pebble Beach lawn and the supercar had already scored itself an owner. Someone with deep pockets dished out a cool $2.5 million to call this special edition supercar his own.

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1994 Bugatti EB110 GT

1994 Bugatti EB110 GT

Believe it or not, Bugatti actually had a rather long and roller-coaster-like lifespan before the Veyron was ever a glimmer in Volkswagen AG’s eyes. In fact, Bugatti outdates its ownership group by roughly 28 years, as VW was founded in 1937 and Bugatti in 1909. Unlike VW, though, Bugatti never fully recovered from WWII, and fizzled away into automotive has-been in the 1950s, despite a few ailed comebacks in the late-`50s and early `60s.

When Romano Artioli bought the rights to the Bugatti name, his first release under the newly acquired name was the extremely advanced 1991 Bugatti EB110 GT. Unfortunately, the EB110 GT, despite its advancements, never really took off, which was mostly attributed to the global recession at the time taking its toll on the automotive industry.

The EB110 GT lasted through the 1995 model year, but only a total of 84 of them were ever built within those five model years. In addition to the 84 completed models, there were 11 incomplete models that were purchased by B Engineering during Bugatti’s bankruptcy proceedings, which later became the basis for the Edonis sports car.

As you can see, the EB110 GT had a storied and tragically short life that was chock-full of unrealized potential, due to economic woes. Well, RM Auctions is giving you a chance to own a piece of Bugatti history by offering up a 1994 Bugatti EB110 GT in Monaco from May 11th to 12th, 2012.

How does this one technical marvel stand up to today’s supercars and is it really worth picking up with all of the supercars available?

Click past the jump for the answers in our complete review.

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2008 Bugatti Veyron Fbg par Hermes

2008 Bugatti Veyron Fbg par Hermes

Bugatti unveiled today at the Geneva Motor Show the Veyron Hermes edition, a special edition priced at 1.55 million euros (not including tax), available at the end of 2008.

The Veyron Fbg par Hermes is powered by a 16-cylinder "W" configuration engine is fed by four turbochargers and features 64 valves, generating 1001 horse¬power at 6000 rpm. The engine draws on its 8-litre displacement to deliver a maximum torque of 1250 Newton-metres between 2200 and 5500 rpm. With full-time all-wheel drive, the car’s phenomenal power produces breath-takingly dynamic handling, with acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in a mere 2.5 seconds.

The carbon-fibre discs provide brake pressure of up to 180 bars, combined with eight-piston monobloc callipers and titanium pistons fitted with fine steel heads and ceramic heat protectors. Apply the brakes at speeds above 200 km/h, and the rear wing acts as an airbrake, positioning itself at an angle of 113 degrees in less than 0.4 seconds, augmenting the Bugatti Veyron’s already impressive stopping power. The airbrake increases negative lift at the rear of the car to 300 kg, enhancing the braking torque on the rear axle. At 400 km/h, emergency braking will bring the sports car to a complete halt in less than 10 seconds.

Press release after the jump.

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2010 Bugatti Sedan

2010 Bugatti Sedan

Bugatti already announced there will be an even more powerful and expensive model than Veyron. It’s true this will be the Project Lydia, a 1175 hp supercar that will be priced at more than 2.5 million euro. But this won’t be the only big thing coming from Bugatti. We all know they like exclusive thing and want to have a world to say in the auto-industry. So why just the supercars world? After all there are a lot of people who would pay one million dollars to own a sedan for their family! Right, no? It seems this is what the company wants: a 950 hp, one million dollar sedan that will be launched in 2010. Competitors? None!

Our renderings is an old Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantic combined with the EB118 and the EB218 Concepts. Both concepts were powered by a 18-cylinder engines. Of course the old and the concepts version needed to be adapted to real life!

More after the jump!

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