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Can the 495-Horsepower Chevy C8 Corvette Beat a 640-Horsepower Cadillac CTS-V?

Can the 495-Horsepower Chevy C8 Corvette Beat a 640-Horsepower Cadillac CTS-V?

Sparks are going to fly, regardless

Remember when we told you that these days, drag races can be a battleground where budget wagons battle luxo-barges, or fully-blown sports cars are challenged by super-sedans? Well, it happened again, since someone thought that pitting the 2020 Chevy Corvette C8 against a 2019 Cadillac CTS-V is a good idea. Let’s not get silly. It’s a brilliant idea.

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Video: McLaren MP4-12C Vs. Cadillac CTS-V

Video: McLaren MP4-12C Vs. Cadillac CTS-V

Every now and again we run across some crazy footage of people doing crazy or amazing things with their cars. In this case, it’s both. What you’re about to witness is a rolling start drag race between what looks like a stock McLaren MP4-12C and a modified, second-generation Cadillac CTS-V.

While we don’t have any information on the race nor its participants, the Caddy’s supercharged, 6.2-liter V-8 is obviously massaged into making a touch more than its stock 556 horsepower and 551 pound-feet of torque. Aftermarket wheels and tires further tip off the Caddy’s hidden potential.

The drag race starts off innocently enough with both cars rolling to the start line. At that point, it’s all gas. The GM small-block’s supercharger whines like a baby at midnight as the Caddy crosses the line ahead of the 616-horsepower, $239,400-McLaren supercar.

This race just goes to show you; a little know-how, some good aftermarket parts, and a solid project car can become something unbelievable.

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Video: Cadillac Escalade HPE550 Vs. Stock Version

Video: Cadillac Escalade HPE550 Vs. Stock Version

The 2015 Cadillac Escalade is one of largest and boxiest full-size SUVs nowadays. I’m not saying it is not stylish, but that thing is huge, heavy and seemingly slow, but once its 420-horsepower V-8 comes to life, the Escalade is anything but slow. In fact, it takes only 6.4 seconds to charge from naught to 60 mph, which is faster than a Subaru BRZ or Scion FR-S, and it reaches the end of a quarter-mile strip in 14.8 seconds.

On the other hand, we know that some potential buyers would like the 2015 Escalade to be a tad quicker. This is where Hennessey Performance and its HPE550 package comes in. The upgrade places a supercharger atop the 6.2-liter V-8 and adds performance-enhancing parts, including a high-flow intercooling system. The result? Output goes up to a whopping 552 ponies and 565 pound-feet of torque, while it 0-to-60-mph drops to 4.9 seconds. Although the Texas-based company hasn’t released quarter-mile figures yet, it’s safe to assume the Escalade HPE550 is in the low 13-second range.

One thing’s for sure, the supercharged Escalade is definitely faster than a base model, and the video above proves just that. Hit the play button to find out why Hennessey charges a $15,950 premium to tweak the 2015 Escalade.

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GM Engineer Training Program Includes Working on a Race Team

GM Engineer Training Program Includes Working on a Race Team

Almost everyone has worked for a faceless corporation before. Part of working for a faceless corporation typically includes going through a ridiculous training program in your first week, or so, that really has very little to actually do with the job you will be doing. The majority of these training programs get slept through or totally skimmed over just to get through it.

Well, GM is taking a new approach to training its engineers and it is one where they will actually learn something that will benefit them in their jobs. GM is placing newly hired engineers on various racing teams that the company sponsors in hopes of these youngsters learning the ins and outs of a racecar.

In the automotive repair world, you learn that former racecar mechanics typically make the best repair technicians, so we would figure that the same would ring true for engineers. Working on a racecar is like seeing a car go from 0 miles to 250,000 miles in a single race, thanks to the amount of stress these things endure. Learning how to maximize the lives and quality of these racecars, while keeping costs minimal and working on a tight deadline, is something that these engineers can transfer directly into the Impalas, Malibus, and Lacrosses we all drive.

Fortunately for the incoming engineers, there are plenty of race teams available to choose from, as GM has stake in eight major racing circuits, including: NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, NASCAR Nationwide Series, NASCAR Truck Series, Grand-Am Road Racing, NHRA, SCCA Pro Racing World Challenge, American Le Mans Series and Indycar.

Unfortunately, GM can’t take all of the credit for this innovative idea, as Honda’s been doing it for many years now. Regardless of who got there first, we have to give GM a lot of credit for taking their quality so seriously.

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