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2021 Cadillac CT5-V Blackwing

2021 Cadillac CT5-V Blackwing

Cadillac supercharges the CT5-V to take on the BMW M5 and Mercedes-AMG E63

The 2021 Cadillac CT5-V Blackwing is an upcoming, high-performance version of the company’s midsize sedan. Set to become the range-topping version of the current CT5, the Blackwing will slot above the CT5-V. Performance-wise, the 2021 CT5-V Blackwing will be the first true successor to the CTS-V, as the CT5-V doesn’t fill the bill in terms of power and torque. On top of a powerful V-8 engine with more than 600 horsepower, the 2021 CT5-V Blackwing will also feature a more aggressive exterior and a revised interior with unique features and upgrades. Find out what to expect from this beefed-up sedan from our speculative review below.

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2020 Cadillac CT4 - Driven

2020 Cadillac CT4 - Driven

Where does the smallest Cadillac fit into the luxury market?

With so many Americans rushing from cars into crossover SUVs, only the strongest sedans are surviving. That’s not good news for Cadillac. Its huge, decadent luxury sedans were once desired all around the world. But while its Escalade SUV is still an international icon and its crossovers are fairly successful domestically, Cadillac failed to establish itself among the leading luxury-sedan brands today. The few remaining luxury sedan buyers more often turn to Audi, BMW, Lexus, or Mercedes-Benz. Some will try out critically acclaimed but unconventional options like Volvo and Genesis. And a growing number are choosing all-electric Teslas over any traditional luxury sedan.

It’s into this backdrop that Cadillac has overhauled its two luxury sports sedans: the midsize CTS and compact ATS. They wear new styling and new names: CT5 and CT4, respectively. This 2020 Cadillac CT4 delivers a sophisticated rear-wheel-drive sports sedan platform at the price of the Germans’ subcompact front-wheel-drive sedans. We recently spent a week in the new CT4 to see whether that’s enough to earn a second glance from the people who still want a luxury sports sedan. Prices start at $32,995.

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2021 Cadillac Escalade

2021 Cadillac Escalade

The fifth-generation SUV is better in just about every department

The 2021 Cadillac Escalade is the fifth generation of the company’s luxury SUV. Unveiled at the 2020 Chicago Auto Show, it replaces a fourth-generation SUV that’s six years old. Just like its predecessor, the 2021 Escalade shares underpinnings with the Chevrolet Suburban and Tahoe. But unlike the old Escalade, it features an independent rear suspension, a first for the nameplate. It’s also the first production vehicle ever to feature curved OLED displays for the instrument cluster and infotainment system. Power comes from a big-displacement V-8 engine mated to a 10-speed automatic transmission, but Cadillac also offers a new 3.0-liter diesel engine, a premiere for the nameplate. Let’s find out more about that in the review below.

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2019 Cadillac XT4 - Driven

2019 Cadillac XT4 - Driven

A hard-core premium competitor or living outside of its element?

Back in 2018, Cadillac finally decided that it was tired of missing out on sales in the compact SUV market and launched the XT4. This compact crossover was designed to compete against the best in the market, including the BMW X1, Mercedes GLC, Infiniti QX50, and Lexus NX, among others. Now that the XT4 has been on the market for well over a year, we decided it was time to get behind the wheel and see how it really holds up. Unfortunately, it doesn’t really seem to hold water against models from BMW, Mercedes, or Audi, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t compete in the market at all. This means there are a lot of questions to answer: How does the Cadillac XT4 drive, does it have enough passenger space, and what about cargo room? What models does the XT4 actually compete against? Well, we spent a week with the XT4, and we’re here to answer all those questions and more . This is what we’ve learned after spending a week with Cadillac’s latest compact crossover.

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2020 Cadillac CT5-V

2020 Cadillac CT5-V

Caddy’s replacement for the CTS-V is a big disappointment performance-wise

The 2020 Cadillac CT5-V is a higher performance version of the 2020 CT5, the midsize sedan that replaced the old CTS in 2019. Nameplate-wise, the 2020 CT5-V is a replacement for the CTS-V, but the redesign is rather lackluster in the performance department. While the CTS-V had in excess of 600 horsepower and delivered more oomph than the competition, the CT5-V’s V-6 engine slips below the 400-horsepower rating. So while it can compete with cars like the 2019 BMW 5 Series and 2019 Mercedes-Benz E-Class in terms of styling, features, and technology, the CT5-V doesn’t replace the CTS-V as a competitor for the beefed-up 2019 BMW M5 and 2019 Mercedes-AMG E63. Check out our review to find out why.

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2020 Cadillac CT4-V

2020 Cadillac CT4-V

Cadillac’s replacement for the ATS-V is disappointing to say the least

The 2020 Cadillac CT4-V is the company’s latest compact performance car and a replacement for the 2019 ATS-V. The CT4-V is based on the CT4, a sedan that’s set to break cover later in 2019. The CT4-V marks Cadillac’s return to the performance compact sedan market, currently dominated by BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and Audi. However, the CT4-V doesn’t go against the high-profile BMW M3, and Mercedes-AMG C63 like its predecessor did.

While the 2019 ATS-V came with a V-6 engine rated at more than 450 horsepower, the 2020 CT4-V features a smaller engine with a smaller output. The new compact features the 2.7-liter four-cylinder that debuted in the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado truck and hits the road with a little over 300 horsepower. Does it have what it takes to compete with Germany’s finest performance sedans? Let’s find out in the review below.

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2020 Cadillac CT5

2020 Cadillac CT5

The CT5 replaces the CTS with an Escala-inspired design

The Cadillac CT5 is the company’s long-anticipated replacement for the already iconic CTS. Spotted testing for more than a year now, the CT5 was unveiled in March 2019 and made its public debut at the 2019 New York Motor Show. The CT5 broke cover with a surprising design. While the CTS is a traditional three-box sedan with a long deck lid, the CT5 is more of a fastback sedan, with a sloping roof that descends toward the edge of the rear fascia.

Needless to say, it’s an interesting approach for an automaker that just axed all four-door sedans save for the flagship CT6. The CT5 also boasts a brand-new interior that includes more premium materials, better fit and finish, and state-of-the-art technology. It’s also packed with new driving assistance systems, as well as an innovative semi-autonomous system. Power comes from a couple of turbocharged engines, but the CT5 still lacks a high-performance variant. Let’s take a closer look at Cadillac’s new midsize sedan in the review below.

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1959 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible

1959 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible

The running epitome of ’50s excess

The ’50s were a strange decade: on the one hand, the danger of nuclear annihilation grew bigger and bigger as tensions between East and West reached new peaks and, on the other hand, automotive design also reached new peaks - peaks touched by the ultra-high fins of cars like the 1959 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible, a true symbol of its time.

When you think of American cars from the ’50s, depending on who you are, you’re bound to first picture in your head one of three cars: the 1957 Chevy Bel Air, the 1955 Ford Thunderbird or the 1959 Eldorado Biarritz Convertible. The latter is most definitely the showboat, figuratively and literally, of a whole design trend; a trend that climaxed with this very car that, in a way, managed to kill off the trend altogether. The trend I’m talking about is of aeronautical inspiration, and it took off (pun intended) in the late ’40s and early ’50s thanks to concept cars like the Buick Le Sabre and a host of other GM Motorama creations.

No, those chrome-bathed fins didn’t help the cars corner better nor did they aid the back end in sticking to the ground better - they were just for style, and 1959 was the year of all-out chrome and all-out fins. Some think those cars are everything that’s wrong with American cars, others simply think they’re flamboyant while others still adore them. I guess it’s a matter of personal preference but, undoubtedly, the ’59 Eldorado continues to turn heads 60 years later.

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2019 Cadillac XT5 Sport Edition

2019 Cadillac XT5 Sport Edition

Darker exterior trim, standard V-6 engine

Introduced for the 2017 model year, the XT5 is Cadillac’s first ever compact crossover. Originally sold alongside the massive Escalade, the XT5 now slots between the XT4 and theXT6. At the 2019 Chicago Auto Show, after three years on the market, Cadillac launched the Sport Package, a limited-edition bundle that adds a bit of variety to the crossover’s three-trim lineup.

The XT5 Sport joins similar versions offered for the smaller XT4 and the larger XT6 SUVs. It gives the XT5 a darker, slightly more aggressive appearance, but it doesn’t change anything under the hood. The Sport package is available with the Luxury and Premium Luxury trims, meaning it comes with a wide range of standard luxury features and technology, sitting just below the range-topping Platinum model. Let’s see what it offers.

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2020 Cadillac XT6

2020 Cadillac XT6

Bridges the gap between the XT5 and the Escalade

Introduced in early 2019, the Cadillac XT6 is the company’s first three-row SUV besides the massive Escalade. It bridges the gap between the latter and the compact XT5 and it rounds off Cadillac’s four-SUV lineup for the 2020 model year. It’s built on the same platform as the Chevrolet Traverse, so it’s pretty much a rebodied, fancier version of the GMC Acadia Denali.

The XT6 arrives to compete in a crowded SUV segment that already includes high sellers like the BMW X5, Audi Q7, and Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class. The Caddy also goes against the new Lincoln Aviator, the popular Acura MDX, and segment leader Lexus RX. How does it compare to some of its most important rivals? Let’s find out in the review below.

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2021 Cadillac XLR Successor

2021 Cadillac XLR Successor

Based on the upcoming Corvette C8

The Cadillac XLR was a high-performance, luxury roadster built from 2004 to 2009 on the same platform as the Chevrolet Corvette C6. The nameplate could return when GM introduces the mid-engined, C8-generation Corvette.

Although there’s no official confirmation from Cadillac, leaked photos of a key fob suggest that the luxury brand will soon unveil a mid-engined sports car with a retractable roof. More specifically, the drawings on the fob look like the upcoming mid-engined Corvette, but also show a convertible roof. The C8-generation Corvette will break cover in 2019, so the Cadillac might follow sometime in 2020, for the 2021 model year. That’s a long wait, so here’s a rendering of the luxury roadster and everything we already know about it.

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2004 - 2009 Cadillac XLR

2004 - 2009 Cadillac XLR

The luxury Corvette that Chevy never built

Introduced in 2003 for the 2004 model year, the XLR was a two-door luxury roadster. A spiritual successor to the Cadillac Allante (1986-1993), the XLR was based on the C6-generation Chevrolet Corvette. Discontinued in 2009 due to low demand, the XLR is Cadillac’s last roadster as of 2019.

Essentially a luxury alternative to the Corvette C6, the XLR had many premium features over its Chevy-badged counterpart. Some of them were optional on the Corvette, but most of them weren’t even available. The XLR also had a design of its own, borrowing many cues from the CTS and STS models of the mid-2000s. Cadillac also produced a higher performance XLR-V version and launched an update for 2009, the vehicle’s final model year on the market.

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