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2016 Electric Vehicle Sales in the U.S. [INFOGRAPHIC]

2016 Electric Vehicle Sales in the U.S. [INFOGRAPHIC]

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Sales by State in 2016

Electric cars have technically been around since 1837 when a chemist named Robert Davidson built an electric car that was powered by galvanic cells. But, the first highway-legal electric vehicle didn’t hit the market until 2008. Since then, interest in electric vehicles has increased slowly but steadily, and in 2017 there are at least 25 PEVs now available on the market. This includes models like the Tesla Model S and X, Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid, Mercedes C350E, and the Volvo XC90 90 T8 PHEV, among others.

So, what is a PEV, really? A PEV is a subset of electric vehicles that includes all-electric or battery electric vehicles (BEVs), plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs), and electric vehicle conversions of hybrid electric vehicles and conventional internal combustion engine vehicles. But, are PEVs actually taking a hold in the automotive market or are they set to see a decline as they did in the early 1900s? Well, we’ve put together an infographic to detail the electric vehicle market statistics here in the United States for the year 2016, including market growth, most popular models, and the number of sales by state. So, let’s take a look at the infographic in detail and talk a little more about it.

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"Pointers You Need to Know When Getting Pulled Over": Infographic

"Pointers You Need to Know When Getting Pulled Over": Infographic

For the next time you’re stopped by the boys in blue

Believe it or not, the police can actually be pretty easy to deal with most of the time. Of course, there’s always a chance you’ll get stopped by some rook on a power trip, but usually, it’s all business, then you’re on your way — unless you were doing like 140 in a 55 or something equally ridiculous. Which, by the way, you don’t want to get caught doing because you’ll probably go to jail. I can vouch for that.

That said, cops, officers, patrolmen, whatever they want to be called, tend to get a pretty bad rap, especially over the past few years with all the bad publicity. But, in a normal situation, where you might be doing 5 or 10 mph over the speed limit, or maybe just rolled through a stop sign, a little respect and courtesy can go a long way. I’m not talking about trying to suck up or anything, but simply doing as they ask, admitting you were wrong (assuming you were), and letting the officer do his job. Believe me; he doesn’t want to be standing on the side of the highway any more than you want to be sitting there with his squad car behind you — it’s dangerous.

So, now you’re probably thinking: “just how am I supposed to act then?” Well, the online blog, CJponyparts, has put together this nice infographic to give you a few pointers. It’s all pretty much about having common courtesy for your fellow man, so don’t think the idea is to bow down and yield life’s authority. So with all that out of the way, take a look at the infographic and take it to heart. Maybe next time you get caught bending the law, things will go a little smoother for you.

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Car Infographics: The Volkswagen Emissions Scandal

Car Infographics: The Volkswagen Emissions Scandal

Volkswagen still finds itself in hot water over its diesel emissions scandal ominously nicknamed “Dieselgate” by industry analysts and journalists. Since 2009, certain Volkswagen Group vehicles with diesel engines from its five subsidiary brands – VW, Audi, VW Commercial, Skoda, and Seat – have come with computers with emissions test-dodging software that allows the vehicles to pass rigorous inspections while producing up to 40 times the legal level of nitrogen oxides during normal driving.

We’ve reported on the facts before, but now there’s an infographic that helps depict exactly what’s going on.

While you can read the graphic for yourself, the images show just how widespread Dieselgate extends. Approximately 11 million vehicles sold in most western countries have been pumping out the same amount of NOx gasses as all of the UK’s power stations, vehicles, industry, and agriculture combined. It’s easier to grasp after understanding 11 million vehicles equals roughly 11 percent of all the vehicles in the world. These are staggering numbers, to say the least.

Of the affected vehicles, the most common include the Audi A3, VW Beetle, Golf, Passat, and Jetta – all spanning from 2009 to 2015. Not surprisingly, Germany has the most effected cars, followed by Britain, France, Spain, and the U.S. While the U.S. is leading the charge against VW and its dirty diesels, other countries around the world have followed suit, with their respective governments and environmental agencies taking legal action against the automaker.

Volkswagen says it is still working out a permanent solution for fixing the affected cars. Until that time, owners of VW diesel vehicles can find if their car’s computer carries the defeat software by entering their VIN into VW’s websites. Check the infographic for details.

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Car Infographics: 2015 Auto Industry: From Recession to Recovery to Record Sales

Car Infographics: 2015 Auto Industry: From Recession to Recovery to Record Sales

The last few decades in the auto industry have certainly seen their ups and downs. The auto industry went from selling 17.3 million vehicles in 2000 to only moving 10.4 million units in the “Great Recession” of 2009. That’s fewer sales than in 1993 when the auto industry sold 13.9 million new vehicles. Slumping sales appear to be behind us, thankfully, as 2015 posted record numbers. Some 17.5 million new vehicles found homes last year.

Deals and incents can take some credit. Taking a look at the infographic down below, you’ll see incentives rose 3.9 percent per vehicle between 2014 and 2015, despite the average transaction price per vehicle rising some 2.5 percent from 2014 to $33,188.

The infographic also shows a telling story about buying practices as well. More drivers are leasing than ever before. In fact, 29 percent of new car sales are through a lease option. That represents a mere two percent rise over 2014, but a whopping 13 percent rise since 2005.

Buying trends are also in flux. Truck, crossover, and SUV sales are growing, while the car market is slowing dropping. Crossovers hold the highest growth, up 18.5 percent, followed by trucks at 13.1 percent and SUVs at 10.7 percent. The car segment lags behind, dropping 2.2 percent. Hard numbers tell a different tale; truck sales rose to more than 9.7 million new units, well above the dropping 7.7 million cars sold in 2015. Leading truck sales, of course, is the venerable Ford F-Series.

There’s plenty of factors and explanations for these facts, so be sure to check out the full infographic further down the page. Just click “continue reading.”

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Car Infographic: Top 10 Apps for Car Owners

Car Infographic: Top 10 Apps for Car Owners

Smartphone apps have made many aspects of our lives easier, and there is a very good chance that your life could be made better right now if you only knew which app to download in order to do it. And that might even extend to driving, but it’s sometimes difficult to figure out where to start when researching apps. There are an estimated 1.6 million apps available for Android, and Apple is only just behind with 1.5 million. So it would helpful to have someone else, someone with a lot of time on their hands, to take a look and find some really good driving apps, maybe even some of the ones you didn’t know you needed.

The folks at SMF, an online auto parts retailer in Ireland, has compiled a handy list of their top 10 app picks for car owners. Some of these are for navigation, always an important thing for drivers, and it never hurts to have a backup for when the app that came with your phone goes all Apple Maps on you. Another one sure to get a lot of use is TuneIn Radio, because good driving music is nearly as crucial as knowing where you’re going.
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Car Infographic: Iconic Journeys, Why You Should Love Modern Transport

Car Infographic: Iconic Journeys, Why You Should Love Modern Transport

Adventure-seekers frequently retrace the routes of famous travelers. Though the modern versions might be less epic in scope, they do have a way of showing off just how good we’ve got it in terms of transportation, and that’s kinda special. To traverse the North American continent or the nation of Japan once required a significant chunk of time, and now with a Land Rover Evoque or bullet train at your disposal, the trip across Japan, at least, can be dispatched in a matter of hours.

Modern transportation has changed the face of the world, and nowhere is that more clear than in this infographic, which compares the time originally taken to complete famous journeys with the amount of time it takes now. The time comparison makes sense, coming as it does from watches2u.com, but the comparison of technology is definitely of interest to gearheads. The 2,481-mile trip from Chicago to Los Angeles took over three months in 1800, but a new car cuts that time down to eight days (apparently the writers of this infographic only plan to drive for five hours a day), as well as accomplishing the trip in air-conditioned comfort and with plenty of restaurants along the way. Similarly, in the 1960s the 503-mile jaunt from Tokyo to Hiroshima was a nine-hour trip by car. With modern bullet trains the trip is down to just over four hours, including bus transfers.

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The World's Most Searched Car Brands: Infographic

The World’s Most Searched Car Brands: Infographic

If you’ve been following the auto industry, you probably already know that Toyota was the world’s biggest-selling carmaker in 2014, with 10.23 million vehicles delivered worldwide. On top of everyone else for the third consecutive year, the Japanese brand was followed by the Volkswagen Group, with 10.14 million units, and General Motors, with 9.92 million. But does this mean these three brands are the most popular in the world?

Not exactly, and I have just the right infographic to prove it.

In late 2014, search giant Google released its annual Trends report, which included the most-searched automakers. Believe it or not, in the U.S. Toyota came in fourth and Volkswagen didn’t even make the top 10. Ford was the most-searched brand, with Jeep and Dodge in second and third, respectively.

Though it may seem complicated, the reasons for this discrepancy are quite simple. Selling millions of cars doesn’t make an automaker popular. It just means that said manufacturer meets the needs of more customers than others. "Needs" include not just types of cars, but availability and affordability as well. This is why companies that sell more cars produce a lot of econoboxes and focus on emerging markets such as Asia-Pacific and South America.

In other words, most people searching for a Subaru WRX don’t actually buy one. A WRX won’t satisfy a family man’s needs in terms of roominess and cargo space, but a larger sedan or an SUV will. The more affordable the better, and we’re back to why Toyota and Volkswagen came to cross swords for the world’s biggest selling carmaker.

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Car Infographic: "NYC to LA: The Ultimate 30 Day Road Trip"

Car Infographic: "NYC to LA: The Ultimate 30 Day Road Trip"

Summer’s not over, and it’s not too late to pack up the car and go exploring. As any dedicated road-tripper will tell you, there are literally thousands of sights to see when you drive across America. It’s the only way to really get a feeling for the sheer size and diversity of this country. Driving straight from New York to Los Angeles is a four-day affair (unless you’re in the Cannonball Run) and that’s without stopping to smell the roses, admire the natural wonders, or check out the local cuisines. Visualistan.com has come up with an “ultimate 30-day road trip” infographic to give you some travel ideas.

Aimed at European travelers, this guide is designed to give the most “American” experience possible, taking travelers straight to the heart of Manhattan (with a stop by the Empire State Building, of course) before jetting off to historic locations like Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Along the way, you’ll stop in Nashville, New Orleans, San Antonio, Aspen, Vegas, the Grand Canyon and more. That’s a lot of The Land of the Free to pack into one trip, and for those who can take the 30 days to pull it off, it will be unforgettable. If I may be so bold, I’d suggest a late-1970s Mercury Colony Park station wagon (with faux wood trim of course) to give the trip the proper ambience. Don’t forget to bring a credit card for gas.

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2016 Mazda Miata VS 2015 Porsche Boxster

2016 Mazda Miata VS 2015 Porsche Boxster

In its 26 years of history until 2015, the Mazda MX-5 Miata saw three generations, several design updates, and numerous engine changes. Conceived as a rear-wheel-drive, compact roadster that was both affordable and fun to drive, the Miata quickly became a hit with sports car enthusiasts and one of the hottest-selling convertibles on the market. For 2016, the Japanese roadster received an extensive overhaul inside and out, along with a new, powerful, yet still fuel-efficient engine.

The fourth-generation Miata came in a time when both the Honda S2000 and Toyota MR2, its traditional rivals, are no longer on the market. With both the Pontiac Solstice and Saturn Sky also gone — along with the brands that sold them — and the Mini Roadster discontinued as of 2015, the Miata is pretty much alone in its niche.

With no other roadster is as affordable as the MX-5, Mazda is now aiming the 2016 Mazda Miata at the 2013-2015 Porsche Boxster, which is both more expensive and significantly more powerful. In the real world, the Miata would be no match for the German. However, Mazda set out to prove that the Boxster isn’t that much better than the Miata in a comparison made by Mazda Parts USA that takes both performance and pricing into account. We decided to add our own input to this virtual test and have a look at the styling and amenities that come with each roadster as well.

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2015 Guide To Electric Cars

2015 Guide To Electric Cars

As electrified lightening-bolt power continues its battle with internal combustion on the track (just look to the front grid of Le Mans and the podium of the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb for a few recent examples), the same is happening on the road. As you’ve no doubt heard, electric vehicles are exploding in popularity – but where, how, and in what sort of quantities? The answers to these questions and many more lie in this infographic.

It starts with annual plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) sales, which has seen a steep rise in the past few years, with a projection of 430,000 new models hitting the road by the end of 2015. 

The U.S. is the No.1 buyer of PEVs, gobbling up nearly 300,000, with Japan following at 108,248 and China third with 83,198.

Popular models include the 2015 BYD Qin in China, the 2014 Chevy Volt in the U.S., and the 2014 Nissan Leaf in Japan. The Leaf is also quite popular stateside, and at over 60,000 units sold worldwide, it’s the best-selling EV in the world.

But what about range? The highest manufacturer-claimed all-electric driving distance goes to the 2015 Tesla Model S with 270 miles, followed by the 2015 Kia Soul EV and 2014 Fiat 500e. 

Of course, there’s plenty more info available here, so click the link to get the complete breakdown. That way, the next time you get into a discussion with your local ICE-lover, you’ll come prepared.

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Car Infographic: 62 Years of Chevrolet Corvette Horsepower

Car Infographic: 62 Years of Chevrolet Corvette Horsepower

Automotive technology has seen a lot of changes in the past six decades or so, especially when it comes to engine output. Horsepower figures once considered exclusive to only the fastest sports cars are now laid down by even the most modest of commuter cars, while the top-end performance vehicles continue onward into the stratosphere with nearly unfathomable horsepower specs. This trend is particularly obvious when considering the under-hood history of Chevrolet’s legendary Corvette,.

Spanning seven generations and 62 years, the story of Corvette horsepower begins in 1953 with the first-generation 1953-1962 Chevrolet Corvette C1. This initial take on the iconic American sports car actually included the option of a carbureted 3.9-liter inline six-cylinder engine. Producing a mere 150 horsepower, this unit made for the least powerful ‘Vette in the model’s long history. Luckily, first-gen buyers could also go with a fuel-injected 5.4-liter V-8 if desired. 

The 1963-1968 Chevrolet Corvette C2 was the first Corvette generation to break the 400-horsepower mark, with the 425-horse big-block 427 V-8 stuffed into the 1965 Corvette Stingray. However looking at the bar graph, we see emissions regulations making their presence known as max horsepower takes a nosedive in 1972, right in the middle of the third generation of the C3. Most of the V-8s from that generation barely made 200 horsepower.

For years, things didn’t really improve all that much, until finally, in 1987, the power began to rise once again. Things really started to heat up with the C5, which Chevy used as the platform to introduce the venerable LS engine line.

The 2006 Chevrolet Corvette C6 was the first generation to see output crest the 600-horsepower mark, with its 638-horsepower supercharged 6.2-liter V-8. These days, with the 2014-2016 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray C7 debuting just last year, you can pick up an example of the racer-for-the-street 2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 for a taste of 650 supercharged horsepower at the rear wheels. 

Which begs the question – how far will the Corvette go when it comes to making outrageous output?

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The facts and figures behind the Formula E battery

The facts and figures behind the Formula E battery

Unlike cat memes, rick-rolling and cyber warfare, infographics are among the more interesting and useful things the Internet has brought us, and now we have a new one about the incredibly potent batteries that power each of the cars on the FIA Formula E grid.

If you not familiar with it, Formula E is the world’s first professional racing series powered exclusively by electricity, and now entering its second year, is beginning to find its footing, with top-flight drivers and an impressive lineup of teams, including Richard Branson-owned Virgin Racing.

All the cars are identical (for now, but more on that in a bit). The Spark-Renault SRT_01E has an aluminum and carbon-fiber monocoque chassis constructed by Dallara, a drivetrain developed by McLaren and a battery pack developed by Williams Advanced Engineering, a subsidiary of the Williams Formula 1 team. The battery and electric motors produce 270 horsepower, or 200Kw, which is enough to power an average-sized house for three days.

Click through to the infographic for more geeky facts about the Formula E battery.

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Car Infographic: Record Breaking Battery Power

Car Infographic: Record Breaking Battery Power

In the not too distant past, automotive industry folks from every walk of life fretted endlessly over the proliferation of the electric vehicle, declaring over and over again that the age of internal combustion was coming to a close and that the way of life humanity had had known for over a century was about to meet an abrupt end. Nowadays, you still hear from that glass-half-empty crowd every so often, but their outcries are a bit muted in the face of the numerous opportunities presented by battery power. So fear not, my fellow speed lovers – the baby won’t get tossed with the bath water when it comes to velocity and electron-powered propulsion, as demonstrated in this infographic. 

Standouts include the 204-mph Lola B12/69 EV race car, the 270-mph Venturi Buckeye Bullet 3, and the 202-mph Bullet remote control car (that’s right, an RC car that breaks 200 mph. Check it out here). But the electric craziness isn’t relegated to just land craft – there’s also the 203-mph Rutan Long-ESA airplane and 187-mph Cigarette Racing/AMG Electric Drive speedboat.

The infographic was created by PureDrive Batteries Limited, a U.K.-based provider of batteries for cars, motorcycles, RVs, boats, and mobility vehicles. Considering where the world seems to be headed, it’s probably a good business to get into.

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Infographic: "10 Greatest Car Movies Ever Made"

Infographic: "10 Greatest Car Movies Ever Made"

In the history of great car movies, it’s not uncommon to see the characters sporting four wheels steal the limelight. Certain films portray vehicles on screen that have an undeniable character, a presence that can rival even the biggest names you see all over the credits. Unfortunately, there’s no Automotive Academy Award, but if there were such a thing, this infographic would list some of its top recipients.

Created by Jennings Motor Group, this infographic seeks to answer the question of which car movie “was the most successful.” Standouts include American Graffiti (1973, Ford Model B ‘Deuce Coupe’), Gone In 60 Seconds (1974, Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Eleanor), The Italian Job (1969, Mk1 Austin Mini Cooper), Senna (2010, McLaren MP4/4 F1), Bullitt (1968, Ford Mustang GT Fastback), Cars (2006, International Harvester Boom Truck), and The Fast And The Furious (2001, Dodge Charger R/T). 

It’s a pretty good list, but I can’t help but think about those unforgettable vehicles that didn’t make the cut because the films in which they appear aren’t necessarily considered “car movies.” For starters, there’s the DeLorean DMC-12 from Back To The Future. While not exactly the fastest two-door in the world, it’s hard to separate the movie and the gull-winged DeLorean.

Another is the 1959 Cadillac Miller-Meteor ambulance from Ghostbusters, aka the Ecto-1. One look at the tall rear fins and roof-mounted gadgets is enough to make any fan reach for his or her proton pack.

Continue reading to learn which were the 10 greatest car movies ever made.

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2015 Ford F-150 Weight Infographic: Trimming the Pounds

2015 Ford F-150 Weight Infographic: Trimming the Pounds

It’s easy to forget the difficulty in cutting excess weight from a vehicle. Well Ford has made an infographic showing the extreme lengths it went to in order to trim the fat off its newest F-150.

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2015 Ford F-150 Weight Infographic: Trimming the Pounds

2015 Ford F-150 Weight Infographic: Trimming the Pounds

It’s easy to forget the difficulty in cutting excess weight from a vehicle. Well Ford has made an infographic showing the extreme lengths it went to in order to trim the fat off its newest F-150.

Sure, everybody knows about the aluminum body cutting weight, but the diet extends further. The 8.8-inch rear axle, for example, has been substantially strengthened over last year’s unit, allowing the truck to run the smaller axle, saving weight as compared to the heavier 9.75-inch axle offered previously. Ford says that alone cuts 35 pounds. Engineers also cut nearly 27 pounds by moving to an electronic parking brake. The e-brake also allows computer-controlled functions like drive-away releasing. Who knew a ratchet pedal and some thin steel cables ever weighed so much?

The savings continues into the mechanicals. The 4WD’s transfer case uses a magnesium housing, saving 3.8 pounds. More impressively, the cast iron steering knuckles were swapped out with aluminum examples, saving 23.1 pounds between the two.

Ford also touts the weight-savings within the F-150’s seats, saying the front seat cuts up to 34.7 pounds while the new rear seat cuts up to 14.7 pounds. That’s nearly 50 pounds in total. The seats were also torture tested with large men in dirty pants – that is they were wearing paints with “special test dirt” to simulate a lifetime of abuse. The leather seats are said to have withstood 10,000 repetitions with out wearing out.

Check out the full infographic by clicking “Continue Reading.” There you’ll see all the information and its accompanying press release.

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Infographic: Self-Driving Cars – The Future of Motoring

Infographic: Self-Driving Cars – The Future of Motoring

Ready or not, autonomous vehicles, or self-driving cars, are coming. Development doesn’t show any sign of abating, and while many cherish their time behind the wheel (TopSpeed readers most definitely included), the potential benefits of this technology are just too good to ignore.

Southside Motor Factors knows this, and has offered us a nice little infographic listing the reasons why self-driving cars are the future of motoring.

After a breakdown of the equipment behind the technology, we get statistics on road safety and the economics of collisions, two of the main justifications for the implementation of self-driving cars. This is followed by predictions about which age groups will become the first “non-driving drivers” and a timeline for adoption.

It’s good information, with solid facts and reasonable forecasts for the future. However, there is one glaring omission – the disadvantages. I’m not trying to be a downer, but it’s important to go into this with both eyes open. As this tech is brought to market, how will we navigate the ethical minefield of both human and AI drivers sharing the road? How will the unemployment of cab drivers, truckers, and similar professions affect the economy? How likely is it your car could get hacked? Will the legions of autonomous vehicles unite to launch an insurrection against humanity?

These are all important questions (well, some of them are), and while there are plenty of potential upsides, the reality of self-driving cars has yet to be proven.

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Infographic: Rent a Car vs Drive Your Own on Roadtrips

Infographic: Rent a Car vs Drive Your Own on Roadtrips

The great American roadtrip is still alive and well in the modern age. The freedom of discovering a wide stretch of tarmac is like the opening of a thousand doors, with new possibilities peaking around every bend. Whether you’re heading for one place in particular, or just roaming for the sake of travel, everyone should take a good, long road trip at least once in his or her lifetime.

However, there are certainly more than a few things to consider before getting on the highway. Travel by car means flexibility in terms of where you go and what schedule you follow, but it also means all the responsibility of making sure you actually get there rests firmly on your shoulders.

Part of the preparation involves choosing what car to take, including the possibility of travel by rental. This infographic from Toyota takes you through that decision process by outlining some of the most important aspects of picking the right ride. You’ll definitely want something that is reliable, comfortable, and easy on the gas budget, and the infographic comes with some very useful tips to consider.

While the infographic is quite useful, I’d say it’s not totally comprehensive. I recently completed an epic, cross-country road trip from Los Angeles to New York in my own Subaru WRX, and from this experience, I’d venture there’s at least one additional consideration to make, which is this: what car do you WANT to take? For my trip, a rental might have been more comfortable and fuel efficient, but there’s something special about driving your own personal car all those miles. It’s one more unique aspect to add to the car’s character, and when I look back at that roadtrip, I’ll remember seeing the country over the burble of a flat-four boxer engine and a blue hood scoop, and to me, that means far more than a few extra dollars saved on gas.

Click past the jump to read the entire infographic

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Infographic: Are Electric Cars Really Green?

Infographic: Are Electric Cars Really Green?

When it comes to solving the world’s energy problems, there’s definitely no silver bullet. Plenty of quick fixes have been offered, but in the end, fossil fuels are far too integral to the operational infrastructure of society to simply cast off in lieu of some alternative. However, many have viewed the electric vehicle as one potential solution to the problem of personal transportation without the use of gasoline. Seems simple enough, right?

Well, not exactly. Even though there’s no tailpipe, the energy to propel an EV still has to come from somewhere. Additionally, the process by which these cars are created is not exactly eco-friendly. By neglecting the gas pump, are we really helping the planet? This infographic examines that question, with consideration to some of drawbacks facing the latest green trend to hit Motordom.

According to the infographic, the average carbon produced during the manufacturing process for an electric vehicle, such as the Nissan Leaf or Tesla Model S, is actually more than twice that of a conventional car. That means you’ll have to drive your EV thousands of miles before the emissions coming from the average gasoline-burner outpace the higher carbon cost of an EV. The batteries used in EV cars are also quite nasty, as they contain many rare and difficult to attain elements, like cobalt, which are associated with their own unique set of problems for the environment.

Now let’s look at where the juice to fill those batteries comes from. The modern electrical grid is powered by a variety of energy sources, most of which are fossil fuels. While renewables like solar and wind power are on the rise, the vast majority of the energy coming from your electrical socket is from coal and natural gas. That means that even if an EV has no tailpipe, it’s still creating carbon just by plugging in. Of course, this all changes in a country where renewables are more fully integrated into the overall electricity grid.

What do you think? Are electric vehicles all hype, or a necessary step to solving the world’s energy problems?

Click past the jump to find out how green electric cars really are.

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Video: Infiniti Launches "A to Z of Formula One" Series

Video: Infiniti Launches "A to Z of Formula One" Series

This Formula One season is looking more and more like a lost cause for every team on the grid not named Mercedes GP. Defending champion Red Bull will likely lose out on the title this year, so in order to pass the time – or at least make it interesting for the four-time champs – the team and its partner Infiniti have taken to launching a new video series called the "A to Z of Formula One."

As the title of the series implies, Sebastian Vettel, Daniel Ricciardo, Sebastien Buemi, Christian Horner, and Adrian Newey all take turns highlighting key aspects of Formula One tied to each letter of the alphabet.

Some are pretty self-explanatory like (A)erodynamics, (H)elmet, (F)ly-aways, and (I)nterlagos, but other letters represented some pretty interesting aspects of Formula One that are a little more obscure. Items like (C)omputational Fluid Dynamics, (D)rag Reduction System, and (K)inetic Energy Recovery System (or as it’s come to be known now, ERS) are interesting to listen to. What’s more is the excellent way the Red Bull guys explain the complex systems on a level that we all can understand.

The series runs in six different episodes, with the second to sixth episodes after the jump.

More videos after the jump.

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Infographic: 2014 Barret-Jackson Analyzed

Infographic: 2014 Barret-Jackson Analyzed

The Barrett-Jackson Auctions are always exciting to watch. The level of perfection in the restoration jobs, or perhaps the pristine level of OEM correctness in the majority of the vehicles rolling across the auction block can be stunning. The prices these cars sell at can be quite stunning as well with some climbing into the multiple millions range. With all the money and metal trading hands every year in Scottsdale, Arizona, it’s interesting to take a deeper look at what makes cars valuable.

Sure, it can be the rarity of a particular vehicle, like say a 1957 Ferrari Testa Rossa, but it can also be a culmination of options that make a particular vehicle more valuable than another, despite being similar in quality.

That’s where this infographic steps in. By looking at all 1,397 vehicles sold at the 2014 Barrett-Jackson auction and crunching a bunch of numbers related to their generic options make-up like exterior and interior color, transmission style, and year of production, the folks at H&H Classic Parts came up with some answers.

Going strictly off the numbers of what options sold for the most, the highest average price would belong to a 1950s era Plymouth with a manual transmission, black exterior paint, and a dark interior. Conversely, a 1980s or newer Pontiac with an automatic transmission, white paint, and a light-colored interior would theoretically have brought the lowest average price.

The reality of the auction is much less ambiguous, however. The highest-priced, crazy outlier that fetched the most dough was a 1967 Chevrolet Corvette L88 Sting Ray with a red on red color scheme. The lucky winning bidder paid $3.85 million with an additional 10 percent in fees going to Barrett-Jackson. Whew!

Click past the jump for the full infographic

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