11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed Gallery

13 photos& 4 videos
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
    FORD Mustang Milano (1970) Concept

    In February 1970, Ford kicked off a new decade at the Chicago Auto Show with a wild-looking Mustang concept car that previewed some of the design direction for the upcoming 1971 models. The exceptionally low-slung, two-seat Ford Mustang Milano took inspiration from the grand touring cars that regularly prowled the roads around the northern Italian city that gave the car its name.

    From its Ultra Violet paint to the nearly horizontal fastback roof, the 43-inch-tall Milano was the most radical Mustang seen up to that time. In fact, were it not for the galloping pony badges on the grille and front fenders and the Mustang script across the back, one likely would never guess that the concept was derived from a 1970 Mustang SportRoof.

    The windshield is sloped back at a 67-degree angle and the electrically-powered rear decklid is nearly horizontal. A trio of NACA-style ducts in the hood force air into the engine while an integrated spoiler at the tail helps keep the rear end planted at higher speeds. The tail features lamps that glow green when the car accelerates, switching to amber when coasting and finally the typical red when the brakes are applied.

    Ford Mustang Milano rolled on an early application of cast-aluminum wheels, with a laced design that replicated classic wire wheels with much greater strength. Similar wheel designs became popular on many cars over the next three decades.
    The purple theme continues into the cockpit, where the seats are finished in light purple leather with blue-violet cloth inserts. Deep purple mohair carpeting covering the floor just screams 1970.

    While some elements of this concept appeared later that year on production Mustangs, the Milano also influenced other Ford cars, like the Australian-market 1974 Falcon XB coupe Americans might recognize as the car driven by the title character in the first two Mad Max films.

  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
    1969 Ford Mustang E 6 Cylinder Fastback Classic Muscle Car for Sale in MI Vanguard Motor Sales

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    1969 Ford Mustang E Code Car

    Only About 50 Mustang E’S Were Produced. They Were Economy Cars With a 250 ci Six Cylinder Engine, Automatic Transmission with a Special Torque Converter, and a low 2.33:1 Rear Axle Ratio. They Were all Sportroofs and had Mustang "E" Lettering on the Rear Quarters.
    250 Inline 6 Cyl
    Working A/C
    Power Steering
    C4 Trans
    60k Miles
    Marti Report
    Currently Has GT Hubcaps (Originals Come With Car)
    Custom Dual Exhaust is Custom Fitted
    Removable Stereo w/ Amp and CD Changer in Trunk
    Original Radio and Ashtray Can be Replaced (Comes With Car)
    Speakers in Kick Panels (Original Vents come with car and could be replaced)
    134 A Conversion to A/C
    Electronic Ignition
    Previous Owner Had for 17 Years
    Original Owner’s Manual
    Restored in 2002 and Have Pictures of Restoration on a Floppy Disc
    Car Was Painted Once. Original Color. That is Why "E" Lettering is not on car.
    Has Mach Spoiler, Graphics, and Hood Scoop.
    Tom 248-974-9513
    www.vanguardmotorsales.com
    tom@vanguardmotorsales.com

  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
    Ford Mustang Mach 1 1966 Concept 7.0 V8 427

    In late 1966, Ford designers prepared a Mustang concept to preview some of the design updates coming for the 1969 model. The Mustang Mach I was a two-seat fastback with a very aggressive looking chopped roof profile. Each of the rear pillars featured a flip-open racing-style gas cap while larger than normal air-scoops dominated the flanks. The sloped rear end included a hatchback, a feature that wouldn’t appear on a production model until the 1974 Mustang II.
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  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
    132351 / 1965 Ford Mustang Wagon

    The mythical Mustang wagon—it has persisted since the earliest days of the Mustang, and even Ford had proposals on the drawing board. However, it appears that the first Mustang wagons were not built by Ford at all, but rather by Intermeccanica at the behest of the W.J. Thompson advertising agency. Constructed in 1965, the car may or may not still exist, but photos and magazine articles from the period are still around, and have inspired a few talented craftsmen to try their hands at creating their own Mustang wagons. This particular 1965 Mustang wagon was built by Joe Ramp and uses as many factory components as possible to create one of the most unique and eye-catching Mustangs you’ll ever see.
    Using 100% steel to create the wagon body meant finding a clean original coupe to use as a foundation. The original roof was retained and lengthened to meet the fabricated D-pillars out back. Side windows were fabricated, while the rear window is the original Mustang coupe piece, which fits so nicely it’s surprising that the factory never decided to go forward with the project. The integration into the original quarter panels is seamless, and the factory deck lid was extensively modified to finish the rear of the car with an OEM look. Brilliant red paint covers the beautiful wagon’s shape, and shows off the unique metalwork and expert fabrication in fine fashion. Gold Shelby-style stripes were added, as well as a hood with an integrated scoop, making this an interesting study in "what ifs."
    Externally the same size as the 289, the fuel-injected 5.0 liter V8 an easy fit in the early Mustang’s engine bay, and looks quite OEM sitting there between those vintage wheel wells. Instead of taking the easy way out and planting a carburetor atop the engine, the entire Ford EEC-IV engine management system was retained. As a result, this one runs and drives like a late-model Mustang, with a very recognizable exhaust note and a smooth flow of torque that’s a 5.0 specialty. The workmanship is impressive, and once you drive this car, you’ll be amazed by how polished the entire package really is.
    Building on the late-model drivetrain, the transmission is a T5 5-speed manual from a Mustang, topped by a Hurst shifter. The rear is a Ford 8-inch sporting 3.00 gears, which make this wagon an exceptional highway cruiser. Stock style suspensions front and rear further the illusion that this is a factory job, although the rear frame area was heavily reinforced to handle the wagon’s extra cargo capacity and weight. A set of unusual Mustang alloy wheels has been fitted, and they wear BFGoodrich T/A radials.
    The interior is just as unusual as the body, with a pseudo-bench style front seat that seems more appropriate on a wagon than in a coupe. A custom center console was fabricated and the filler between the seats gives the illusion of a bench. It has been covered in brown vinyl that looks right at home in the ’60s icon, and the tan used on the dash and kick panels is elegant and upscale. White door panels and headliner make it bright and airy inside, an effect enhanced by the large rear side windows. The back seat is as big as the one in a standard Mustang coupe, so you shouldn’t be afraid to grab a few friends when you take this beautiful car out for a cruise. The A/C has been neatly integrated into the dash with a few discreet vents, and the original AM radio remains in the center of the dashboard, with a powerful AM/FM/CD stereo built into the console below it. Brown carpets both in the passenger compartment and the cargo area tie the entire interior together in a very OEM fashion.
    Few cars have the star power of this little Mustang wagon, and you’ll probably find that no matter where you go, there’s an enthusiastic crowd that gathers, and they’ll have plenty of questions. A fun, practical, stylish, and very attention-getting car, this 1965 Mustang wagon isn’t quite one-of-a-kind, but it is most certainly unique. Call today!

  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed
  • 11 Ford Mustangs You Never Knew Existed