Aston Martin is hard at work to revamp its lineup using the Mercedes-AMG underpinning and Affalterbach’s new 4.0-liter V-8 powerplant, but that doesn’t mean that the Brits aren’t developing technologies of their own. According to a new report, Aston Martin has filed a trademark for "Aeroblade," an application that will be used for "passenger cars and racing cars and parts and fitting therefor."

Obviously not a vehicle (unlike the majority of trademark applications we usually report about), Aeroblade is likely an aerodynamic element that will find its way on at least one of the company’s upcoming sports cars. Details are scarce at this point, but judging by the name, I expect it to be some sort of adjustable rear spoiler, possibly similar to that seen on the McLaren 650S.

McLaren’s element is called "Airbrake" and offers optimized levels of downforce at the rear of the car, and because it operates with a greater level of functionality, it provides increased stability. The Airbrake deploys whenever the car senses extra downforce is needed, rather than extending under braking or when manually operated. The Aeroblade is likely to be similar, as such a feature can be implemented on both track-focused road cars and race cars.

There’s no word as to which upcoming model will benefit from the Aeroblade, but there’s a possibility that its first application will be a souped-up version of the DB11, which will replace the DB9 in 2016.

Continue reading for the full story.

Why it matters

Given the company’s recent investment into the bonkers Vulcan project, I’m not at all surprised to see the Brits filing trademarks for vehicle parts. Although I have strong doubts that the Aeroblade will be something revolutionary, Aston Martin probably needs a trademark in order to give the said component a strong marketing campaign. Remember how Chevrolet made a big fuss about the aerodynamic "Flowtie" badge on the Camaro Z/28’s nose? Aston Martin is probably preparing a similar marketing scheme for one of its upcoming sports cars, and the Aeroblade will be an important part of it. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. I don’t know about you, but I’m really excited when sports cars get all sorts of special features that improve downforce and performance, and I’m really anxious to see what the Aeroblade is all about. Especially if the big unveiling will be preceded by several teasers and maybe a little too much PR talk.

Aston Martin Vulcan

2016 Aston Martin Vulcan
- image 649156

Read our full review on the Aston Martin Vulcan here.

Source: Autoguide

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