California-based Ferrari collector get stiffed on owning a Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta

Ferrari is known for being a purveyor of some of the finest performance cars the world has ever seen. That much is true. It’s also known for being particularly picky to whom it sells, particularly those limited-edition versions with a specific numbered quantity. Not everyone can get their hands on one, even if they distinguish themselves for being hardcore supporters of the Italian brand. The late Preston Henn found that out first hand when he was denied a Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta last year. Now, noted watch and jewelry entrepreneur David Lee has found himself in that list too… for the exact same reason.

Yes, Ferrari is shutting the door on the possibility of Lee ever scooping up any one of the 209 LaFerrari Apertas the Italian automaker plans to build. According to the LA Times, Maranello won’t give the exact reason why it’s giving the cold shoulder to one of its most esteemed collectors, but Lee himself sees it as a possible punishment for all his perceived grand-standing on social media. The man is known to have social media accounts that prominently feature his Ferraris. He might say it as helping the company get more exposure than it already has, but for an automaker that prides itself on being far removed from all the flashy self-promotion that has inundated social media these days, Lee’s constant habit of flaunting off his Prancing Horse models (he even owns one of Michael Schumacher’s Formula One\ cars from the 2002 season) likely runs counter to what the Italian automaker stands for.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

The Lession Here: Don’t piss off Ferrari

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Rub the company the wrong way and you could find yourself on the short end of a raw deal

It takes a lot for a company like Ferrari, who places premium importance on its loyal tifosi to say “no” to somebody who considers himself a member of that club. Then again, Ferrari’s rules or beliefs are gospel among its clientele. Rub the company the wrong way and you could find yourself on the short end of a raw deal. The late Preston Henn found that out, and now, David Lee has, too.

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Personally, I don’t think anybody’s in the wrong here. Lee may be better off by having an extra sprinkling of humility, but he’s also well within his rights to show off his cars how he sees fit. He paid for all of them with his money so he can do whatever he wants with them, even showcase them off to Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for all the world to see. It’s going to rub some people the wrong way, but he paid a steep price to be in the position that he’s in. Plus, Lee isn’t forcing anyone to follow his accounts.

As far as Ferrari’s concerned, it could also be better off by being a little less stringent with its most exclusive model

As far as Ferrari’s concerned, it could also be better off by being a little less stringent with its most exclusive models. But it didn’t get to where it is today by having that kind of attitude either. Part of Ferrari’s charm is the company’s ability to stand out for its exclusivity. Not everyone can buy a Ferrari to begin with, and even those with money to spend are unlikely to make a habit out of buying more of them. Even well-known collectors with established Ferrari allegiances – Hess even owns a yellow 1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale that raced at Le Mans that’s considered to be the most expensive Ferrari in the world – aren’t immune to Maranello’s terms and conditions. That’s why the LaFerrari Aperta has become somewhat controversial. It was at the heart of Hess’ lawsuit against the company, which he eventually dropped before passing away in April 2017, and it’s also at the center of Lee not being able to get one.

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Ultimately, this looks like a case of two different opinions on what good practice should be. Nothing wrong with it, although if I were Lee and I want to collect the most exclusive of all exclusive Ferraris, making sure I don’t ruffle the Prancing Horse’s hide is a pretty important reminder for the future.

Engine 6.3-liter V-12 and a HY-KERS
Horsepower 789 HP @ 9,000 RPM
Torque 516 LB-FT @ 6,750 RPM
0 to 60 mph <3 seconds
0 to 124 mph <7 seconds
0 to 186 mph 15 seconds
Top Speed 217 mph

Read our full review on the Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta here.

Source: Los Angeles Times

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