Could become a CR-V in Acura Guise to Fight the Lexus UX and Cadillac XT4

Acura has renewed its U.S. patent for the CDX name – one that belongs to a China-only crossover based on the Honda CR-V. While Acura has sold the compact CDX crossover in China since 2016, no official talk has emerged about Honda bringing the luxury-branded vehicle to the United States. Unfortunately, that remains the case despite the patent filing.

See, Honda originally patented the CDX name back in 2015 ahead of the crossover’s debut for the Chinese market. Since then, Acura’s U.S. branch has made do without an entry-level crossover below the RDX. In fact, the mid-size RDX and full-size MDX remain Acura’s only two crossovers. Now, especially more than ever, seems to be the right time for a third member in Acura’s crossover lineup.

The segment is getting increasingly more competitive with new entries and refreshed versions of existing vehicles. Both Lexus and Cadillac have new vehicles on the horizon for the segment with the UX and XT4, and vehicles like the Audi Q3, Volvo XC60, Jaguar E-Pace, Alfa Romeo Stelvio, Lincoln Nautilus, Range Rover Evoque, and even the Buick Encore all enjoy strong sales.

Continue reading for more information.

About the China-Spec Acura CDX

Honda Renews U.S. Patent for CDX Name High Resolution Exterior
- image 673930
The crossover is certainly enjoying sales in China where the vehicle has single-handedly doubled the automaker’s annual sales.

The compact crossover is base on the Honda HR-V and offers seating for five. Power comes from Honda’s 1.5-liter turbocharged four-cylinder making 179 horsepower and 177 pound-feet of torque. This is the same 1.5-liter used in the Honda Civic, CR-V, and Accord. An eight-speed dual-clutch transmission is the sole choice, though customers can choose between front-wheel drive and all-wheel drive.

Here in the U.S., the Honda HR-V uses a naturally aspirated 1.8-liter four-cylinder that makes 141 horsepower and 127 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual is actually standard, but most models come with the extra-cost Continuously Variable Transmission. Front-wheel drive is standard and all-wheel drive is optional. Naturally, it makes sense Acura would use the more powerful engine is its luxury-branded version.

Honda Renews U.S. Patent for CDX Name High Resolution Exterior
- image 673934
Acura would be extremely wise to bring the compact luxury crossover stateside.

While it’s unknown if Acura will bring the CDX to the U.S., the crossover is certainly enjoying sales in China where the vehicle has single-handedly doubled the automaker’s annual sales. Should Acura manage the same feat here, Honda’s luxury brand would be in a far better place. That’s especially true as the crossover market continues to gain steam as customers forego sedans for family transportation. Acura has to get more involved in the game before it becomes irrelevant.

Both Lexus and Cadillac are already doing the same. The UX Concept recently debuted by Lexus previews the automaker’s entry-level luxury crossover that slots under the current NX. Cadillac, on the other hand, is currently expanding its SUV line with the upcoming XT4. Already on the market for almost a year, the mid-size XT5 is selling like hotcakes compared to the ATS and CTS sedans. Of course, Cadillac continues to sell plenty of full-size Escalades, but with a cost upwards of $100,000, the body-on-frame SUV isn’t for the masses. The XT4, on the other hand, will aim right at the middle- and upper-middle classes.

While it would require getting the CDX past U.S. regulations, Acura would be extremely wise to bring the compact luxury crossover stateside.

References

Acura CDX

Honda Renews U.S. Patent for CDX Name High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 673932

Read our full review on the 2017 Acura CDX.

no article
- image 742500

Read more Honda news.

What do you think?
Show Comments
Car Finder: