And you don’t even need to plunk down a copay

The automotive tech wars are as hot as ever, and Jaguar Land Rover is looking to invest in the future in a variety of fields, including autonomous driving and augmented reality driver assists. Now, JLR will step into a new space - disease prevention. Thanks to the implementation of ultraviolet light technology (UV-C) with a vehicle’s onboard heating / ventilation / air conditioning (HVAC) system, JLR hopes to stop the spread of colds, the flu, and other pathogens.

The Tech Isn’t New, But Its Implementation In A Car’s HVAC System Is

Jaguar Land Rover Thinks it Can Help Stop the Spread of Colds
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Ultraviolet light technology (UV-C) is the same tech used in the medical industry for a variety of purposes.

“UV-C is currently widely used for disinfecting water, filtering air, and sterilizing surfaces by utilizing wavelengths of light between 200 - 280 nanometers,” JLR explains in the attached press release.

Ultraviolet light technology works by breaking down a pathogen’s DNA at the molecular level, essentially sterilizing whatever it’s exposed to.

As JLR points out, this could even help fight the spread of drug-resistant “superbugs.”

In fact, JLR claims that if UV-C is integrated with a car’s air filtration system, it could potentially reduce the transmission of “major superbugs” by as much as 30 percent.

Jaguar Land Rover Thinks it Can Help Stop the Spread of Colds
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“The average motorist spends as much as 300 hours per year behind the wheel,” JLR says. “There is a clear opportunity to better utilize cars for administering preventative healthcare.”

Personally, I think it’s kinda funny we need to turn to our cars for adequate healthcare, but hey, I guess that’s the age we live in.

Of course, the idea of sterilizing a car’s cabin air is nothing new.

JLR currently equips the Jaguar I-Pace and the Range Rover Sport with a four-zone climate control system that uses Cabin Air Ionization to remove pathogens with negatively charged particles.

This system also provides additional benefits by combating odor and various allergens.

Jaguar Land Rover Thinks it Can Help Stop the Spread of Colds
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All told, I can’t help but be reminded of the Bio Weapon Defense Mode in the the Tesla Model X all-electric SUV, which uses a medical-grade HEPA air filter to keep the cabin air as clean as that of an operating room, even if there’s a military-grade bio weapon attack outside the vehicle.

Unfortunately, it’s likely this sort of feature will become more and more important in the future, given that climate change has been linked with the wider spread of infectious diseases.

Further Reading

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Jaguar Land Rover Demonstrates All-Terrain Self-Driving Research

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Read our full review on the 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Evoque.

The car of the future could help win the battle against superbugs – according to Jaguar Land Rover.
Future models could help stop the spread of colds and flu thanks to innovative ultraviolet light technology (UV-C) borrowed from the medical industry, where it has been used for more than 70 years.

Using a type of ultraviolet light, Jaguar Land Rover believes it could help to stop the spread of bacteria and harmful viruses
Future ventilation systems could neutralise pathogens which cause infections
UV-C technology can help stop the spread of cold and flu, while reducing the transmission of major superbugs by up to 30%*
Jaguar Land Rover is exploring a wide range of driver and passenger wellbeing features as it works towards a self-driving future
Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Steve Iley believes cars can play a part in preventative healthcare in an age of shared mobility
Thursday 27th March 2019, Whitley: The car of the future could help win the battle against superbugs – according to Jaguar Land Rover.

Future models could help stop the spread of colds and flu thanks to innovative ultraviolet light technology (UV-C) borrowed from the medical industry, where it has been used for more than 70 years.

By integrating UV-C, Jaguar Land Rover believes it could help to stop bacteria and harmful viruses, known as pathogens, from surviving in the cabin. UV-C is currently widely used for disinfecting water, filtering air and sterilising surfaces by utilising wavelengths of light between 200 – 280 nanometres.

Exposing pathogens to UV-C within the air conditioning system breaks down the molecular structure of the DNA, neutralising them. Clean air is then released into the cabin. The technology could even help in the fight against drug-resistant superbugs.

Jaguar Land Rover is exploring UV-C technology as part of its vision to create a tranquil sanctuary inside each of its luxury vehicles. The manufacturer is piloting a wide range of driver and passenger wellbeing features, as it looks towards a self-driving future.

“The average motorist spends as much as 300 hours per year behind the wheel. There is a clear opportunity to better utilise cars for administering preventative healthcare.” “The implementation of individual wellbeing measures as part of our ‘tranquil sanctuary’ research promises to not only improve quality of life for our customers but in this case, offers clear advantages in reducing pathogen spread – protecting the overall population from the threat of disease; particularly as we move towards shared mobility solutions.”
DR. STEVE ILEY
JAGUAR LAND ROVER CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER
Jaguar Land Rover is already actively seeking to neutralise pathogens in its latest generation Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems, available across the range including the all-electric Jaguar I-PACE and Range Rover Sport. The current Four-zone Climate Control and Cabin Air Ionisation system works by using high voltage to create trillions of nano-sized negatively charged particles (ions) coated in water molecules. These ions deactivate pathogens, forming larger particles which are removed from the air as they are brought back into the filter. As well as combatting pathogens, the ions also act upon odour molecules and allergens in a similar way.

“In the colder months infections are spread more easily, it’s reassuring to know that in your car at least, you can be confident that harmful pathogens are being neutralised.”
DR. STEVE ILEY
JAGUAR LAND ROVER CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER
Recent medical trials* suggest the use of UV-C could be even more effective as it has been shown to cut the transmission of four major superbugs by up to 30%. Researchers focused on four drug-resistant organisms: MRSA, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), C. difficile and Acinetobacter.

“The rise of superbugs and allergens is one of the largest threats we face as a species today. Investment in immunology is vital in ensuring that our immune systems stay ahead of the race against microorganisms, which are evolving far quicker than traditional pharmaceuticals can keep pace with. It is important that we continue to take an innovative look at how we can adapt our environment to help prevent the spread of the most harmful pathogens - which is why this research is paramount.”
IMMUNOLOGY EXPERT, DR. HELLMUT MÜNCH
CEO AT MEDICAL ENZYME RESEARCH ASSOCIATION

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