Humans are getting bigger, so our crash test dummies should too, right?

Obesity seems to be an epidemic that’s slowly taking over the world. Here in America, 33 percent of the population is said to be obese, with the average weight for men climbing 21 pounds to 195 and the average weight for women climbing 20 pounds to 166 over the last 50 years. That’s actually a pretty big deal. Some of it can be attributed to the overwhelming amount of unhealthy fast food available, while at the same time, we Americans love to eat, which doesn’t help the situation.

Be that as it may, the U.S. isn’t anywhere near being the most obese place in the world with places like American Samoa, and Nauru coming in first and second, respectively. Even Tonga, Palau, and Kuwait beat us out, but we do land in the top 20, just above Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. But, that’s not the point of the video you’re about to watch. The point is that the world is getting fat enough that crash dummy manufacturers are now working on developing dummies that are fat.

How fat? Well, we don’t know for sure, but a few years ago, Humantics was developing dummies that weighed upward of 270 pounds, so it’s not necessarily a new concept. Either way, ABC’s Good Morning America ran a segment that gives us a behind-the-scenes look at the next-generation of test dummies that will soon be tasked with telling us how safe future cars are – even for those who are overweight.

With that said, go ahead and click play to learn more about it and see just how big the next-gen test dummies might be.

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Robert Moore
Editor-in-Chief and Automotive Expert - robert@topsped.com
Robert has been an auto enthusiast his entire life. He started working cars at a young age, learning the basics from his father in the home garage on the weekends. As time went on, Robert became more and more interested in cars and convinced his father to teach him how to drive when he was just 13 years old. Robert continued working on cars in his free time and learned as much as he could about engines, transmissions, and car electrical systems, something that only fed his curiosity more and eventually led him to earn a bachelors degree in automotive technology with a primary focus on engine performance and transmission rebuilding.  Read More
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