The fearsome straight-line beasts can now kick ass on tracks as well

Elon Musk recently announced on Twitter that Tesla would be discontinuing the 75 kWh variants of the Model S and Model X. The two models will now be offered only in the 100 kWh and 100 kWh Performance versions. The smaller battery-capacity car is up for sale only until Sunday night. Does this mean this mean that Tesla will begin using its new battery cells in the Model S and Model X, a move that could eventually make them track worthy?

A Smart Strategic Move

The move to discontinue the 75 kWh Model S and Model X would help the models widen the price gap between both the models and the Model 3.

For example, the price of the base Model S 75D was $76,000, which overlapped with the price of a fully-loaded Model 3 Performance.

Although established companies don’t mind prices overlapping each other as long as the customer sticks to the same showroom, it will not work well for a company like Tesla that barely has four models in its line up. There is no room to have a ‘scapegoat’ product. That said, the base price of the Model S and Model X will now increase significantly. The Model S’ new entry-level trim - the 100D — will now start at $94,000, whereas the Model X 100 D would bear a price tag of $97,000; $$15,000 more than the base-trim it replaces.

New Batteries For A Better Mile Range And Performance

Now That Tesla Is Discontinuing the 75-kWh Battery, with the 2020 Model S and Model X Finally Become Track Worthy? Exterior
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Speaking in technical terms, the Model S and the Model X are now in the run for a battery upgrade. Currently, both the models are equipped with 18650 cells that are smaller and older than the 2170 cells being used in the Model 3.

These newer cells would probably even allow the Performance-branded Model S and X to sustain for longer on the track.

Even though the Teslas are known for their monstrous sprinting abilities in a straight line, the present cells used in the Model S and Model X were not ideal for track use due to their tendency to overheat. This issue has been largely addressed with the Model 3, thanks to the 2170 cells and the clever cooling systems, as evidenced by the vehicle’s dedicated Track Mode setting. So, it the future you might want to expect the Model S and Model X to scare the life out of its competitors on a race track.

This Is A USP For Tesla

Now That Tesla Is Discontinuing the 75-kWh Battery, with the 2020 Model S and Model X Finally Become Track Worthy? Exterior
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Apart from potentially unleashing Track Mode for the Model S and Model X, these new cells would also result in a better range, thus making a strong case for itself against the likes of Porsche Taycan and the Jaguar i-Pace that are still competing against the bar set by the 18650 batteries. So, what is the range we are looking at here? Well, maybe something in the ballpark of 400 miles on a single charge. How does that tickle your range anxiety?

Time For Model Y To Slot Itself In The Lineup

Now That Tesla Is Discontinuing the 75-kWh Battery, with the 2020 Model S and Model X Finally Become Track Worthy? Exterior
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By dropping the Model X 75D from its lineup, Tesla does not have an inexpensive SUV in its line up anymore, thus creating a vacuum in the most popular segment of the EVs

. Of course, Tesla will not let go off the territory, so this where the Model Y comes into the picture. The Model Y has been doing rounds on the internet for quite some time now. Even Musk kept providing updates about the vehicle. He even mentioned that he has approved the construction of the Model Y’s Alpha prototype. So, expect an announcement for this in the coming months.

Do you think this strategy will earn dividends? Share your thoughts with us in the comments section below.

Further Reading

2016 Tesla Model X High Resolution Exterior
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Read our full review on the 2018 Tesla Model X.

2017 Tesla Model S Exterior
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Read our full review on the 2018 Tesla Model S.

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