Don’t get misled by the Facebook post, tweaking the C_Two for production is a daunting task

Rimac is hard at work testing, tweaking, and making sure that the production version of the C_Two hypercar will rise to the expectation. Other than crash testing the C_Two, Rimac is also applying the finishing touches on equally important aspects for a super-sporty all-electric vehicle, namely handling, road dynamics, and grip. So the Croatian carmaker took one C_Two test mule out to play, with the playground being the famed Porsche Engineering-owned Nardo Technical Center located in Southern Italy.

Rimac C_Two Testing at Nordo

Over the past month, our in-house test drivers and engineers have worked to evaluate and refine the C_Two's driving...

Posted by Rimac Automobili on Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Believe it or not, Rimac is so busy tweaking the C_Two and getting it ready for its debut that it didn’t find the time to come up with a name for it yet. Baptizing-related matters aside, tuning the C_Two to its final form is a challenging task. And, while the all-electric hypercar has been under development for the past three years, that’s actually a rather short amount of time during which a small carmaker like Rimac had to get a lot of things right, including global homologation for passive safety. That is one of the conditions required for the vehicle to be considered road legal around the world.

We can only assume that Rimac has perfected that part of R&D since it published a handful of pictures showing a camouflaged prototype clad with sensors on the test track at the Nardo Technical Center. Those of you who are wondering about the Porsche Engineering wording in the background should know that the facilities are currently owned by Porsche, who also happens to own a 15.5 percent stake in Rimac as part of a collaboration in the field of battery technology. So it really shouldn’t be a surprise that the C_Two is testing on the Nardo proving grounds.

When is Rimac launching the street-legal C_Two?

Rimac Took the C Two to Nardo and Bragged About it With Some Cool Pictures
- image 874712

It’s hard to pinpoint an exact date.

We have reason to believe that the road-going version of the C_Two will take a bow at the 2020 Geneva Motor Show.

Until then, Rimac will look to further tune-up the C_Two both at Nardo and in other parts of the world. What’s more, the company hopes to launch the car and kick off deliveries at the end of next year, which coincides with the 2020 SoP (Start of Production) timeframe initially laid out by the Croatian manufacturer.

Once Rimac irons out every single wrinkle in the C_Two’s development, those who actually buy one will be in for a treat.

The hypercar is said to deliver 1,408 kilowatts (1,914 PS or 1,888 horsepower) and 2,300 Newton-meters (1,696 pound-feet) of torque from four independent permanent-magnet electric motors that also get a fancy software-controlled torque vectoring program.
Rimac Took the C Two to Nardo and Bragged About it With Some Cool Pictures
- image 874711

Feeding the e-motors is a 120-kWh battery pack good for a maximum range of 340 miles. When range is not your primarily concern, the C_Two can double down on the fun factor thanks to a 0-60 miles per hour sprint time of just 1.85 seconds and a top speed of 260 miles per hour.

Rimac C_Two Performance And Powertrain
Battery Pack Capacity 120 kWh
Range Per Charge 340 miles
Electric Motors four
Combined Horsepower 1,914
Torque 1,696 pound-feet
0-60 mph 1.85 seconds
Top Speed 260 mph

Those performances are also enhanced by a clever aerodynamic setup that includes active elements such as the front and rear diffusers, rear wing, and a hood turning vane. When needed, the driver can select the so-called “low-drag mode,” which imprints a 0.28 aerodynamic coefficient on the C_Two’s body.

Tudor Rus
Assistant Content Manager - Automotive Expert - tudor@topspeed.com
Tudor’s first encounter with cars took place when he was only a child. Back then, his father brought home a Trabant 601 Kombi and a few years later, a Wartburg 353. At that time, he was too young to know how they worked and way too young to drive them, but he could see one thing – each of them had a different ethos and their own unique personality. As time went on, he started seeing that in other cars as well, and his love for the automobile was born.  Read More
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