The French sports car isn’t getting the axe just yet, but its future doesn’t look good

In times of restrictions and cost-cutting, guess what sort of cars are the most vulnerable? It’s those models that don’t bring in a lot of sales and which, at the same time, are expensive to produce. Most often than not, those victims identify themselves as sports cars.

Let’s take the Alpine A110, for example. So far, it was able to elude its demise as the Dieppe plant won’t get shut down. The future, however, holds no good news for the A110.

We’ll get four more years with the Alpine A110, that’s for sure

The Alpine A110 Has Escaped the Clutches of Death For Now But It's Living On Borrowed Time High Resolution Exterior
- image 707040

Renault announced a massive $2.2-billion cost-cutting plan recently and some of the carmaker’s plants in France were said to be under threat as the company is looking to lay off 15,000 employees around the world.

At the time of writing, the Alpine A110 looked like it managed to dodge the bullet as Renault will not be closing the Dieppe plant where the sports car is made.

For now. However, the A110 might not live to see another generation. How do we know?

The Alpine A110 Has Escaped the Clutches of Death For Now But It's Living On Borrowed Time High Resolution Exterior
- image 707039

Well, ingrained in Renault’s press release that addresses its cost-cutting strategy there’s a possible scenario that goes like this: "open reflection on the reconversion of the Dieppe plant at the end of the production of the Alpine A110."

What can that mean? For starters, it’s obvious that the A110 will be let to see out its planned seven-year career. The sports car saw daylight in 2017, which means that production should ’naturally’ end in 2024. After that, well, it looks like Renault’s head honchos will have to decide whether the A110 will get a successor or not.

The Alpine A110 Has Escaped the Clutches of Death For Now But It's Living On Borrowed Time High Resolution Exterior
- image 708523

The good news is that we’ll still have the Alpine A110 around for four years but the bad news is that the sports car that was supposed to give the Porsche Cayman a run for its money might not make it out alive come 2024. Either way, time and the economic climate will tell.

Tudor Rus
Assistant Content Manager - Automotive Expert - tudor@topspeed.com
Tudor’s first encounter with cars took place when he was only a child. Back then, his father brought home a Trabant 601 Kombi and a few years later, a Wartburg 353. At that time, he was too young to know how they worked and way too young to drive them, but he could see one thing – each of them had a different ethos and their own unique personality. As time went on, he started seeing that in other cars as well, and his love for the automobile was born.  Read More
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