• The Ares Panther Might Have a DCT, But You Can Still Pretend To Shift Your Own Gears

The Ares Design Panther will have a gated shifter without having a manual gearbox

There are cars out there that truly deserve to have a modern-day successor. Without a doubt, the De Tomaso Pantera is one of those cars. Luckily, the people from Ares Design are of the same mind, which is why they’ve given birth to the Ares Design Panther. Although from every angle, the car looks like a worthy successor to the original, we will be focusing on one of its distinctive features – the gated shifter.

The Ares Panther Might Have a DCT, But You Can Still Pretend To Shift Your Own Gears
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Old Italian supercars are often praised for their coveted gated shifter. It’s also one of the reasons why they retain their price so well and make great investments. Recognizing this, the people from Ares Design have blessed the Panther with a gated shifter. However, if you look closely, you’ll see the “P” and “N” in the place of first and second gear. The letter “P” has taken the place of fifth gear and “R” remains in its current place. Although there are shift paddles, you can also choose to shift manually from the gated shifter, as the third and fourth gear positions are just for that.

The Ares Panther Might Have a DCT, But You Can Still Pretend To Shift Your Own Gears
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The Panther is based on the Lamborghini Huracan and uses the same 5.2-liter normally-aspirated V-10, mated to a new sequential gearbox.

The car originally came out in 2018 and all 21 cars were quickly sold. It seems, now the company has brought back the car, which now features a “fake” gated shifter. The revised Panther also has a new throatier exhaust and bigger, 21-inch, single-piece aluminum wheels.

The Ares Panther Might Have a DCT, But You Can Still Pretend To Shift Your Own Gears
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Although it doesn’t have a Ford V-8 like the original Pantera, the Huracan is a very capable platform and promises great performance. The 2018 Panther produced 650 horsepower and 442 pound-feet (600 Nm), which translated into a 0 to 60 mph (97 km/h) time of 3.1 seconds and a top speed of over 200 mph (322 km/h). The new exhaust may have brought a slight increase in power, but there are no exact figures yet. If you want one, be prepared to pay at least $700,000.

Dim Angelov
Dim Angelov
Born in 1992, I come from a family of motoring enthusiasts. My passion for cars was awoken at the age of six, when I saw a Lamborghini Diablo SV in a magazine. After high school I earned a master’s degree in marketing and a Master of Arts in Media and Communications. Over the years, I’ve practiced and become skilled in precision driving and to date have test driven more than 250 cars across the globe. Over the years, I’ve picked up basic mechanical knowledge and have even taken part in the restoration of a 1964 Jaguar E-Type and an Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint. Lately, I’ve taken a fancy to automotive photography, and while modern cars are my primary passion, I also have a love for Asian Martial Arts, swimming, war history, craft beer, historical weapons, and car restoration. In time, I plan my own classic car restoration and hope to earn my racing certificate, after which I expect to establish my own racing team.  Read full bio
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