The BMW M3 Touring is the Ultimate M Car - story fullscreen Fullscreen

The BMW M3 Touring is the Ultimate M Car

For the record, it’s also the first M3 in wagon form throughout its 36-year history

The 2023 BMW M3 Touring has finally been revealed to the world, and it’s definitely the wagon of our dreams. It’s also the first time in the M3’s 36-year history that a wagon body style has been offered. While it still has the same controversial face as the M3 sedan and M4 Coupe, almost all is forgiven thanks to the M3 Touring’s svelte wagon body.

The BMW M3 Touring is the Ultimate M Car
- image 1087472

It also happens to be the fastest wagon to go around the Nurburgring, doing the job in just 7 minutes, 35.060 seconds. For perspective, that’s faster than the BMW M5 Competition, which comes with a bigger, more powerful twin-turbo 4.4-liter V-8 that produces 625 horsepower and 553 pound-feet of torque.

The BMW M3 Touring is the Ultimate M Car
- image 1087469

On the other hand, the M3 Touring, which is only available in Competition form, makes do with the same engine as its sedan sibling and the M4 Competition, which means it has a 3.0-liter twin-turbo straight-six that produces 503 horsepower and 479 pound-feet of torque. This engine is connected to an eight-speed automatic, and in the case of the M3 Touring Competition, this provides power to an M xDrive all-wheel drive (AWD) system. This enables the M3 Touring Competition to sprint from 0-100 km/h (62 mph) in just 3.6 seconds, all the way to a top speed of 174 mph.

Contributing to the M3 Touring’s record-breaking Nurburgring run are its M-tuned suspension and Active M differential. As standard, the brakes are more capable than the standard 3 Series Touring, but those who want even more stopping power can opt for the optional carbon-ceramic brakes.

The BMW M3 Touring is the Ultimate M Car
- image 1087346

As for the rest of its design, it’s pretty much what you expect from the wagon version of the M3 sedan, albeit in a wagon form that’s arguably better looking and more practical. That bucktooth grille is still there, but we’re sort of finding its front end easier to forgive as the rest of the car looks properly good. The usual M bits are there, such as the wider fenders, quad exhausts, M aerodynamic mirrors, and a set of staggered wheels with those at the front measuring 19 inches and the rear ones at 20 inches.

The BMW M3 Touring is the Ultimate M Car
- image 1087443

The interior is also likewise your standard fare for the M3, which means it follows the footsteps of the 2023 update that brings with it a revised dash design. The iDrive 8 that debuted in the iX electric SUV has also made its way to the M3 Touring, while BMW is proud to highlight that the M3 Touring is the most practical M3 ever. They certainly have every reason to be proud, because, with all the seats folded, BMW claims that the M3 is capable of offering 1,510 liters (53.3 cubic feet) of space.

The BMW M3 Touring is the Ultimate M Car
- image 1087344

The development of the BMW M3 Touring wasn’t easy to green light. In a world where SUVs dominate sales nowadays and wagons are only popular in certain parts of the world, the economics of mass-producing one was hard to justify. However, the clamor among the M community was so strong, that BMW deemed it feasible to build the M3 Touring.

Unfortunately, for those living in North America, you won’t be getting the 2023 BMW M3 Touring anytime soon. BMW M’s much-anticipated wagon will only be sold in select markets such as Europe and Australia, which means once again, the M3 Touring will be another forbidden wagon fruit in North America

Isaac Atienza
Isaac Atienza
Isaac Atienza is a Filipino motoring journalist who joined TopSpeed.com in 2021. He is a car enthusiast who especially thinks that wagons are the best type of vehicle, though sports cars and anything with three pedals also tickles his fancy.  Read full bio
About the author

Related Articles

Here’s Everything You Need To Know About The All-New 2023 BMW M3 Touring

What do you think?
Show Comments
Car Finder: