It’s not a shock given the franchise’s glorification of reckless driving

In a surprise to absolutely no one, a recent study conducted by The New York Times revealed that moviegoers who have just come out of watching Fast and Furious movies are embracing the franchise’s glorification of reckless driving, resulting in a spike of speeding violations immediately after showings of the movies.

The Fast and Furious Movies Apparently Make People Speed
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That analysis revealed a 20-percent increase in speeding tickets on the weekends after “Fast and Furious” releases.

In reviewing the correlation between the consumption of the Fast and Furious movies and reckless driving, NYT reviewed detailed traffic violation data from Montgomery County, Maryland, specifically all 192,892 speeding tickets that were handed out from 2012 to 2017. With the data on hand, NYT analyzed the average miles per hour over the speed limit that drivers were charged with going on a specific day. That analysis revealed a 20-percent increase in speeding tickets on the weekends after “Fast and Furious” releases. Apparently, moviegoers got so amped up with the exploits of Dominic Toretto and Family that they wanted to experience the thrill of going fast and furious themselves.

The study also revealed that the rates of reckless speeding — drivers driving more than 40 mph above the speed limit — nearly doubled during the same period. Geographically, the study also showed that these incidents of reckless speeding were concentrated in areas close to movie theaters, specifically on Route 270, a major highway that runs next to a number of movie theaters in the area.

The Fast and Furious Movies Apparently Make People Speed
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The study also revealed that the rates of reckless speeding — drivers driving more than 40 mph above the speed limit — nearly doubled during the same period

The study also conducted a “falsification test” by comparing the dates of Fast and Furious releases to similar dates from other years where the franchise wasn’t in theaters. The results returned with no effect on speeding violations. The results are similar when NYT compared driver behavior after watching The Hunger Games movie franchise. Since the movie didn’t glorify reckless driving, speeding violations didn’t go up in the aftermath of watching those movies.

Granted, the Times did admit that it had a small sample size — one county in the U.S. — so the analysis itself was limited. But it still painted an accurate picture of our behavior after watching a Fast and Furious movie. We may not admit it, but we’ve all had that urge to push the pedal on our cars harder and longer than we’re used to after seeing Dom Toretto and his crew do it to maximum effect.

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References

Revisiting All The Relationships Of The Fast and Furious Universe
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Read more Fast & Furious news.

Source: New York Times

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