New Testing Shows Just How Dynamic the Four-Cylinder Toyota Supra Is

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Back in January, we told you that thefour-cylinder Toyota Supra was coming for 2021, and it’s definitely the car you want. While the four-cylinder Supra will offer significantly less power – 255 horsepower vs. 382 horsepower – it will have better weight distribution (50-50), less weight (about 170 pounds less), and will have a more affordable price. In short, it’s good on its own or a perfect base for those that start to wrench and modify the second a new sports car is delivered. We haven’t had the chance to get our hands on a new four-cylinder Supra, but our friends over at Car & Driver did. As it turns out, we were definitely right – the 2020 Toyota Supra is as impressive as expected and maybe even better than expected.

2021 Four-Cylinder Supra – Great All-Around Performance

The Four-Cylinder 2021 Toyota Supra Is As good As Expected Exterior
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If you’re someone that just looks at power output, you might not understand the value that something like a four-cylinder Toyota Supra brings to the table. With just 255 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque, it really doesn’t offer a lot of extra power over something like the Toyota GT86, for example. In fact, it’s down on the six-cylinder Supra, with 382 horsepower and 368 pound-feet of torque, by 127 horsepower and 73 pound-feet of torque. Obviously, it doesn’t roll off the line as fast, nor will it bury you in the seat quite as hard, but there’s a lot of merits some seem to overlook.

The Four-Cylinder 2021 Toyota Supra Is As good As Expected Exterior
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As I mentioned before, the four-cylinder Supra is about 170 pounds lighter than the six-cylinder model. But, what’s more important is that thanks to the smaller engine, the bulk of the weight in the front end sits closer to the center of the car, which means Toyota is able to achieve a 50-50 weight distribution. That same engine delivers its full grunt of torque at just 1,550 rpm, so it doe jolt off the line pretty good too. What C&D discovered during testing, however, seals the deal for me.

Coming in at $8,000 less, the four-cylinder Supra was able to make the sprint to 60 mph in 4.7 seconds and blistered through the quarter-mile in 13.3 seconds at 104 mph. To put this into comparison, the six-cylinder model makes the same sprint in 3.8 seconds and runs the quarter-mile in 12.1 seconds. So, it’s slower, but less weight and better weight distribution have reportedly made the car better to drive. Straight-line speed is good, but handling is a big deal. In fact, C&D said,

“you’re not going to easily boot the tail out in slow corners for fun like you can do with the 3.0-liter car.”
The Four-Cylinder 2021 Toyota Supra Is As good As Expected Exterior
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The outlet later when on to say that “even in stock form, the 2.0-liter car is a quick, fun rear-driver. As it turns out, a four-cylinder Supra is still a Supra and still a lot of sports car.” And, as the outlet pointed out, some simple aftermarket tuning – like say a new intake, new exhaust, and retuned computer – could easily push that little BMW four-banger into 300-horsepower territory. Considering that you’ve saved some $8,000 over buying the six-cylinder engine, you could have the glory of owning a modified four-cylinder supra with better driving dynamics for almost the same price with just a little bit of extra investment.

The Four-Cylinder 2021 Toyota Supra Is As good As Expected Exterior
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All told, the four-cylinder Supra sounds like a winner to me and, honestly, it’s probably what I would go for. You can’t tell that it’s a four-cylinder model from a visual standpoint, and I’d much rather do a few mods and have something unique than boast about stock power output.

2021 Toyota Supra 2.0 specifications
Engine 2.0-liter inline four-cylinder with twin-scroll single turbo
Horsepower 255 HP @ 5,000 - 6,500 RPM
Torque 295 LB-FT @ 1,550 - 4,400 RPM
Transmission ZF 8-speed automatic
Weight 3,181 lbs
0 - 60 mph 5.0 seconds

Source: Car & Driver

Robert Moore
Robert Moore
Editor-in-Chief and Automotive Expert - robert@topsped.com
Robert has been an auto enthusiast his entire life. He started working cars at a young age, learning the basics from his father in the home garage on the weekends. As time went on, Robert became more and more interested in cars and convinced his father to teach him how to drive when he was just 13 years old. Robert continued working on cars in his free time and learned as much as he could about engines, transmissions, and car electrical systems, something that only fed his curiosity more and eventually led him to earn a bachelors degree in automotive technology with a primary focus on engine performance and transmission rebuilding.  Read full bio
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