The Lotus Evija’s performance numbers just don’t add up; it should sprint to sixty in under 2 seconds

Lotus has shown its most powerful and most extreme car ever, the Evija all-electric hypercar. In fact, according to the specs published by the U.K.-based sports car maker (now owned by Chinese giant Geely), it will be the most powerful production car ever made, just nudging ahead of the likes of thePininfarina Battista.

It’s a truly gorgeous looking thing, with typical Lotus design but rendered in a more futuristic manner that not only makes the car stand out, but at the same time it makes it look far more exclusive than anything the automaker has previously sold. However, while I love the way it looks, there’s something a bit peculiar about its claimed performance - to me, the amount of power and torque and the declared benchmark sprint time just don’t add up. I think it should be faster than they say it is, so keep on reading as I try to elaborate as to why.

How quick does Lotus say the Evija is?

The Lotus Evija isn't quick enough for a near-2,000 horsepower EV hypercar
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Lotus says the Evija (the ‘j’ is silent, so you pronounce it ‘Eviah’) has four individual electric motors, one on every corner. Each makes 500 PS (497 horsepower) and the combined total is a round 2,000 PS (1,987 horsepower); total torque is rated at 1,700 Nm (1,254 pound-feet) and the vehicle weighs 1,680 kilograms (3,703 pounds).

The automaker has yet to announce the car’s actual sprint time from naught to 100 km/h (62 mph), and right now it’s aiming for a sub-3-second time.
Lotus Evija sprint times
0-100 km/h (0-62 mph) Under three seconds
0-300 km/h (0-186 mph) Under nine seconds
Max speed In excess of 200 mph (320 km/h)

How quick do I think it should be?

The Lotus Evija isn't quick enough for a near-2,000 horsepower EV hypercar
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It is definitely going to be blisteringly fast, but there are plenty of cars out there with less than half its horsepower and they can and do accelerate faster than that. The 2017 Porsche 918 Spyder plug-in hybrid, for instance, with 887 PS (875 horsepower) was independently timed as being able to reach 96 km/h (60 mph) from a standstill in an almost unbelievable 2.2 seconds - Porsche was apparently being conservative with its claimed 2.5 seconds time.

Another example is the all-electric 2018 Tesla Model S P100D with the so-called “Ludicrous mode.” Tesla says it can reach 96 km/h (60 mph) in 2.4 seconds but it too was independently timed at 2.28 seconds, so over one tenth quicker than claimed. And keep in mind the Model S is quite a heavy car (especially compared to the Evija) and nowhere near as aerodynamic as it either.

The Lotus Evija isn't quick enough for a near-2,000 horsepower EV hypercar
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Want another car that will apparently beat the Evija off the line? How about the V-8-powered 2010 Ariel Atom 500, with 500 horsepower, that only has 550 kilograms (1,212 pounds) to lug around. With its impressive 900 horsepower/ton power to weight ratio, it sprints to sixty in just 2.3 seconds, and unlike the two aforementioned cars, all its power is transmitted to the road via the rear tires. But as impressive as the Atom 500’s power to weight ratio is, the Evija trumps it with 1,182 horsepower/ton and with all-wheel drive, it theoretically should be much faster.

2020 Pininfarina PF0 Battista
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Finally, I must mention the very similar Pininfarina Battista, a car with slightly less power (1,900 horsepower), but more torque (2,300 Nm or 1,696 pound-feet) and all-wheel drive. Its makers claim it will sprint to sixty in under 2 seconds - one full second faster than the Lotus and to me the British automaker’s very conservative sprint time estimate just doesn’t make sense.

Why say it will sprint in under 3 seconds when that’s really nothing to brag about given that there are other cars already out (some over 10 years old) that are quicker than that and the vehicle that’s as close to a direct rival as it’s got (with similar power and torque) is a full second quicker?

But the Evija is faster than the Battista up to higher speeds, though - Pininfarina claims its pure EV hypercar hits 300 km/h (186 mph) in under 12 seconds, while Lotus says its entrant needs just 9 seconds - that’s a lot quicker and it’s a tad strange given that the Pininfarina is initially quicker.

Final word

The Lotus Evija isn't quick enough for a near-2,000 horsepower EV hypercar
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To me this all seems strange and my only explanation for it is Lotus hasn’t really given its Evija prototype the full beans, as they say in the U.K. - the current performance estimates the manufacturer has provided must be very conservative, at least from naught to sixty, because the Evija should really be much-much quicker to sprint. Maybe when it releases the full official performance numbers, the sprint time will drop to a level that better reflects its grip and power combination. I mean, the Evija really should be able to sprint to sixty in under 2 seconds, not 3, and I’m now waiting for Lotus to publish more accurate figures.

2020 Lotus Evija Specifications
Name Lotus Evija (Type 130)
Powertrain Pure electric, 4WD
Power The target is to be the most powerful production car in the world, at 2,000 PS
Battery power 70 kw/h / 2,000 kW
Torque 1,700 Nm with torque vectoring
0-100 km/h (0-62 mph) Under three seconds
0-300 km/h (0-186 mph) Under nine seconds
Max speed In excess of 200 mph (320 km/h)
All-electric range (WLTP Combined) Approximately 250 miles (400 km)
Charging time (350kW charger) 18 mins
Weight 1,680 kg
Production run Maximum of 130 cars
Overall dimensions (L/W/H) 4,459 / 2,000 / 1,122 mm
Price £1.5m-2m + duties and taxes
Reservation process £250k refundable deposit secures a production slot
Start of Production 2020

Further Reading

The Lotus Evija isn't quick enough for a near-2,000 horsepower EV hypercar
- image 850395

Did Lotus Just Rewrite The Book on All-Electric Supercars with the 2020 Evija?

2020 Lotus SUV High Resolution Exterior Exclusive Renderings Computer Renderings and Photoshop
- image 629759

Read our full review on the 2020 Lotus SUV.

2018 Lotus Exige Sport 410 Interior Exterior
- image 779359

Read our full review on the 2018 Lotus Exige Sport 410.

2017 Lotus Exige Sport 380 High Resolution Exterior
- image 703633

Read our full review on the 2017 Lotus Exige Sport 380.

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