New Evidence Suggests That a More Powerful Ferrari Portofino is Coming in 2021

A recent filing with the Environmental Protection Agency hints that Ferrari is planning a new model, which is right now only known as the “2021 Ferrari F164 BCB”. At a glance, this probably doesn’t tell you anything, but Ferrari fans and enthusiasts will tell you the F164 is the internal model code for the Portofino. With fuel economy figures for the 2021 Ferrari Portofino already submitted and a second submission for the “Ferrari F164 BCB”, we’re willing to bet there’s a new model on the way. This is what we know about it.

The 2021 Ferrari F164 BCB – Ferrari F164 FL: Something is Strange Here

We Have A Looking Glass Into the Ferrari Portofino's Future, and Something Big is Coming High Resolution Exterior
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With there being two listings on the fueleconomy.gov, we know that Ferrari is planning a second, Portofino-based model.

Usually, we’d look to the “BCB” in the name to decipher what it might be, but that yields little help. Digging deeper into Ferrari’s application for certification, though, we can see that Ferrari is also referring to the car as the “F164 FL” (see page 12-1).

It would be easy to assume that “FL” means facelift, and I might even pass it off as that if it wasn’t for the dual listings on fueleconomy.gov. This “FL” designation could simply be used to signify a new model that’s intended to be kept a secret or, and what I’m hoping is more likely, is that FL stands for “Formula Libre” Don’t recall what that is? Well, let me point you back to the Ferrari 166 FL of the mid-20th. In short, Formula Libre racing allows different types of vehicles to race against each other.

The Ferrari Portofino FL – Roma Power and (Probably) Less Weight

We Have A Looking Glass Into the Ferrari Portofino's Future, and Something Big is Coming High Resolution Exterior
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In Ferrari’s certification summary information report, the F164 BCB is listed with the Ferrari Roma Coupe’s twin-turbo, 3.9-liter V-8. That engine, as we know it today, produces 612 horsepower and 560 pound-feet of torque. The Portofino, on the other hand, delivers just 591 horsepower and 560 pound-feet of torque. So, the “BCB” or “FL” as we’re calling it, would represent a 21 horsepower increase over the current model. The same document also suggests that the Portofino’s normal seven-speed automatic transmission is out to make way for the Roma’s eight-speed gearbox.

What Kind of Performance Will the Ferrari Portofino FL Offer?

We Have A Looking Glass Into the Ferrari Portofino's Future, and Something Big is Coming High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
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While we’re skeptical that the Portofino FL will be a track-prepped car, it is coming with some extra horsepower, and we suspect a slight reduction in weight. Based on this, you should expect it to hit 60 mph in between 3.3 and 3.4 seconds (an extra tenth or two faster than the standard Portofino at 3.5 seconds) while top speed will likely remain the same at “over 199 mph.”

The interesting thing about this, however, is that the Portofino FL (or BCB, if you prefer) see’s a one mpg improvement across the board despite offering more power. It is rated by the EPA at 16 mpg in the city, 23 mpg on the highway, and 19 mpg combined. The Portofino, as we know it today, is rated at 15,23, and 18, respectively.

We Have A Looking Glass Into the Ferrari Portofino's Future, and Something Big is Coming High Resolution Exterior
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I’ve personally tried to reach out to Ferrari for clarification in what these filings mean and what we can expect, but I’ve yet to hear back from them. For now, you can probably expect to see something come into focus within the next four months. This is scheduled to be a 2021 model, and Ferrari isn’t going to waste any time in getting in on the market. If I happen to hear back from Ferrari in the meantime, I’ll be sure to update this article accordingly.

Robert Moore
Editor-in-Chief and Automotive Expert - robert@topsped.com
Robert has been an auto enthusiast his entire life. He started working cars at a young age, learning the basics from his father in the home garage on the weekends. As time went on, Robert became more and more interested in cars and convinced his father to teach him how to drive when he was just 13 years old. Robert continued working on cars in his free time and learned as much as he could about engines, transmissions, and car electrical systems, something that only fed his curiosity more and eventually led him to earn a bachelors degree in automotive technology with a primary focus on engine performance and transmission rebuilding.  Read More
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