The C8 Corvette is as practical as they get

Chevrolet just unveiled the highly anticipated C8 Corvette. It’s not only the first mid-engined Corvette in history, but the C8 also packs some ground-breaking technology. Like most supercars out there, the C8 Corvette features a nose-lift system, but it’s a bit different than what you get from other brands.

How does it work?

This feature makes it easier to navigate on city streets where low speeds are enforced through speed bumpers

Chevrolet’s nose-lift system works like a ground lift system from any other brand: it lifts the front end by a few millimeters so that you can drive past speed bumps or curbs without damaging the bumper. This makes it easier to navigate on city streets where low speeds are enforced through speed bumpers or even when you need to drive over a curb into a driveway.

Nose-lift is a common feature in the sports car and supercar segment, especially on the higher end models. McLaren uses it in all of its models, but examples also include cars from Ferrari, Lamborghini, and Porsche. These systems are obviously electronic and are activated from inside the car. A push of a button is usually enough to increase the ride height by one or two inches. Once you’ve driven past the speed bump, a push of the same button will revert the lift.

What makes the C8 Corvette’s nose-lift special

We've Seen Nose-Lift Tech on Super Cars Before, but the 2020 Chevy C8 Corvette Takes it to a Whole New Level
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The GPS can remember up to 1,000 locations, so you're covered for any city, no matter how big

It might not seem like a big deal that the C8 Corvette has a nose-lift system. After all, most serious supercars have one. But Chevy’s lift feature is far from mundane. Unlike other nose-lift systems, this one works in conjunction with the car’s GPS and stores any point on the map where you raise the nose. It doesn’t stop here, though. Once a point is stored on the map, the system will automatically raise the nose when you pass through that point again.

The GPS can remember up to 1,000 locations, so you’re covered for any city, no matter how big. The Corvette isn’t much of a daily driver either, so it’s unlikely that you’ll run out of space for nose-lift locations on the GPS.

Is it practical enough?

We've Seen Nose-Lift Tech on Super Cars Before, but the 2020 Chevy C8 Corvette Takes it to a Whole New Level
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You can operate the system at speeds of up to 24 mph

Nose-lift is a cool feature to have, but not all systems are very practical. On some cars, you need to drive at very low speeds or even come to a half to raise the nose. Fortunately, this isn’t the case with the C8 Corvette. You can operate the system at speeds of up to 24 mph and the GPS link will raise the nose automatically. You don’t have to do much except slow the car to or below 24 mph. You don’t have to stop the car and you don’t have to push any buttons.

The nose will lift for 40 mm (1.57 inches) in two stages, as needed. The C8 Corvette needs only 2.8 seconds to lift to its maximum height, so you won’t have to wait too long either. Driving over bumps, potholes, and steep driveways will become a breeze and make the C8 Corvette one of the most practical supercars on the market.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray drivetrain specifications
Type: LT2 6.2L V8 VVT with direct injection and Active Fuel Management (cylinder deactivation)
Bore & stroke (in / mm): 4.06 x 3.62 / 103.25 x 92
Block Material: A319-T7 cast aluminum with cast-in iron cylinder liners and nodular main bearing caps
Oiling System: Dry sump-type (7.5-qt. capacity); includes oil-spray piston cooling
Oil Type: Dexos 2 0W40 synthetic
Cylinder Head Material: 319-T7 cast aluminum
Combustion Chamber volume: 59cc
Compression Ratio: 11.5:1
Valvetrain: Overhead valve, two valves per cylinder; dual-equal variable valve timing.
Valve Size (in / mm): 2.13 / 54 hollow (intake) & 1.59 / 40.4 sodium filled (exhaust)
Fuel Delivery: Direct injection with Active Fuel Management: Max pressure: 2,175 psi (15 Mpa / 150 bar)
Firing Order: 1-8-7-2-6-5-4-3 (all cylinders); 1-7-6-4 (with deactivation)
Throttle body: 87mm single bore (electronic)
ECU: GM E99 (32-bit processing)
Horsepower (hp / kW @ rpm): SAE-certified to 495 / 369 @ 6450 rpm (with performance exhaust)
Torque (lb.-ft./ Nm @ rpm): SAE-certified to 470 / 637 @ 5150 rpm (with performance exhaust)

Further reading

We've Seen Nose-Lift Tech on Super Cars Before, but the 2020 Chevy C8 Corvette Takes it to a Whole New Level
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Wait, the All-New 2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8 is Priced How Much?!

The 9 Mid-Engine Corvette Concepts That Didn't Make it To Production
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Read all about the mid-engined Corvette concepts that never made it to production!

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Zora ZR1 Computer Renderings and Photoshop
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Read our speculative review of the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Zora ZR1

2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 Exterior
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Read our full review of the 2019 Chevy Corvette ZR1

1953 - 1962 Chevrolet Corvette C1 High Resolution Exterior
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Read up on the 1953-1962 Chevy C1 Corvette

1963 - 1968 Chevrolet Corvette C2 High Resolution Exterior
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Check out our review of the 1963-1968 Chevy C2 Corvette

1969 Chevrolet Corvette 427/430 L88 Exterior
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Read our in-depth review of the 1969 Chevy Corvette 427 C3

2001 - 2004 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 (C5)
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Read up on our review of the 1997-2004 Chevy C5 Corvette

2010 Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport High Resolution Exterior
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Read up on the 2005-2013 Chevy C6 Corvette

2014 - 2016 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
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Check out our full review of the 2014-2019 Chevy C7 Corvette

The 9 Mid-Engine Corvette Concepts That Didn't Make it To Production
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The 9 concepts that led to the mid-engined Chevrolet Corvette C8

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