You Think Dealer Markups in America Are Bad? This Non-Existent Bugatti Centodieci is Ridonkulous - story fullscreen Fullscreen

You Think Dealer Markups in America Are Bad? This Non-Existent Bugatti Centodieci is Ridonkulous

If you’re paying almost $10 million for a car, what’s another $4.5 million, right?

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Despite the recent press coverage of insane dealer markups on cars like the Chevy C8 Corvette, Ford Bronco, and Ford Mach-E, it’s been going on for a long time. Back in 2018, Kia dealers were marking up the Stinger for at least $10,000 over MSRP and back in 2016, the Acura NSX was subject to a similar “market adjustment.” Now, a Japanese dealer is proving to the world that no matter what a car’s base price is, there’s always room for markup – even if it starts out deep in the seven-figure range.

You Think Dealer Markups in America Are Bad? This Non-Existent Bugatti Centodieci is Ridonkulous Exterior
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Dealer markup might be a sham for dealers to stick it to the little guy, but it isn’t a new thing.

The aforementioned cars like the C8 Corvette and Ford Mach-E have one thing in common – there are, for the most part, mainstream automobiles. So, a dealer markup or “market adjustment” as they like to call it might be a big deal to your average consumer, but it’s a pretty common thing. But what about something that wears a Ferrari, Lamborghini, or Bugatti badge? Those certainly aren’t subject to such things, right? Well, a Japanese dealer says otherwise as it’s looking to get around €12.5 (or about $14 million at current exchange rates) for one of the 10 Bugatti Centodieci that will be produced.

You Think Dealer Markups in America Are Bad? This Non-Existent Bugatti Centodieci is Ridonkulous Exterior
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That figure makes for a markup of around $4.5 million over the base price, but there’s a big catch

That figure accounts for a total dealer markup of around $4.5 million over the base price of $9.5 million (€8 million). But, that’s not necessarily the craziest part, as this Tokyo-based dealer doesn’t even have the supercar yet. In fact, it won’t be available until sometime in 2023. The build slot is scheduled for delivery to Bologna, Italy in January 2023, at which point it’ll be shipped off to Japan, assuming nobody purchases the build slot and a deal is worked out for delivery elsewhere.

You Think Dealer Markups in America Are Bad? This Non-Existent Bugatti Centodieci is Ridonkulous
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But, it’s not something that you hear about happening to something that costs well into the seven figures

Is the Bugatti Centodieci really that special? Well, it kind of is. Its name means 110 in Italian and it was designed to pay tribute to the legendary Bugatti EB110 while simultaneously celebrating the 110 years since Bugatti was founded. This is why there are numerous bits and pieces of EB110 DNA scattered throughout it. It’s powered by an 8.0-liter W-16 that makes 1,600 horsepower (1,176 kW) and 1,108 pound-feet (1,600 Nm) of torque. With a curb weight of 4,354 pounds (1,975 kg), the Centodieci can sprint to 62 mph in 2.4 seconds, 124 mph in 6.1 seconds, and 186 mph in 13.1 seconds all while aiming toward a top speed of 236 mph (380 km/h).

Bugatti Centodieci specifications
Engine 8.0-liter W-16
Horsepower 1,600 @ 7,000 RPM
Torque 1180 lb-ft (est)
Transmission Seven-Speed DCT
0-62 MPH 2.4 Seconds
0-124 MPH 6.1 Seconds
0-186 mph 13.1 Seconds
Top Speed 236 MPH
Weight 4,354 pounds
You Think Dealer Markups in America Are Bad? This Non-Existent Bugatti Centodieci is Ridonkulous Exterior
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See, this is just for the build slot, and the supercar won’t even be available until sometime next year, with its delivered scheduled for January 2023 in Bologna, Italy.

So, is it worth a dealer markup that pushes pricing up by more than 30-percent? Well, I guess that’s in the eye of the beholder, but it sure does seem a bit excessive to me.

Source: James Edition

Robert Moore
Robert Moore
Editor-in-Chief and Automotive Expert - robert@topspeed.com
Robert has been an auto enthusiast his entire life. He started working cars at a young age, learning the basics from his father in the home garage on the weekends. As time went on, Robert became more and more interested in cars and convinced his father to teach him how to drive when he was just 13 years old. Robert continued working on cars in his free time and learned as much as he could about engines, transmissions, and car electrical systems, something that only fed his curiosity more and eventually led him to earn a bachelors degree in automotive technology with a primary focus on engine performance and transmission rebuilding.  Read full bio
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