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2019 Ford F-150 Black Ops Edition

2019 Ford F-150 Black Ops Edition

This is the F-150 for those who want to intimidate everyone that gets in their way

Much of the pickup world’s attention has been on the Tesla Cybertruck these days, but before anyone starts to forget, the Ford F-150 remains the king of all trucks. It’s the standard-bearer in the segment, a distinction it has it more than earned. The F-150 also carries the distinction of being one of the most customizable trucks in the segment. It’s versatile enough that it can even spawn special edition models, one of which comes to us by way of Ford’s relationship with Indiana-based Tuscany Motor Company. The two companies are responsible for the F-150 Black Ops trucks, a special edition set that pays tribute to the armed forces of the United States. It just so happens that a Ford dealership, Brown Lee Ford, has an F-150 Black Ops, so if you’re looking for a special edition F-150 with serious upgrades throughout, we might just have found the one for you. The 2019 Ford F-150 Black Ops is priced at $88,525.

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1969 Dodge Coronet Super Bee

1969 Dodge Coronet Super Bee

A Plymouth Road Runner in disguise

The Dodge Coronet was first introduced in 1949 as one of the company’s first post-war body style. Production spanned over four generations until it was discontinued in 1959. The nameplate returned in 1965 on the B-body platform, shared with the Plymouth Belvedere and Road Runner and the Dodge Charger among other Mopar vehicles. The sixth and seventh generations followed in 1971 and 1975, but the Coronet was discontinued for good in 1976. Arguably the most iconic version of the Coronet was that produced between 1968 and 1970 when the nameplate was also involved in Detroit’s muscle car wars.

After three years on the market, the fifth-generation Coronet was redesigned in 1968, as was the Dodge Charger, which shared the B-body platform. The facelift brought a more aggressive design, new appearance packages, and upgraded engines. Dodge even introduced a station wagon version of the Coronet 500, but the star of the lineup was obviously the range-topping Super Bee trim. This version was produced from1968 through 1971 model years only and was Dodge’s version of the successful Plymouth Road Runner.

Continue reading to learn more about the Dodge Coronet Super Bee.

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1989 Ferrari 412 Pavesi Ventorosso

1989 Ferrari 412 Pavesi Ventorosso

The only convertible 412 ever built. It’s a custom, but a damn ugly one

It’s common knowledge that Ferraris have been among the best-selling and most expensive classic cars for quite a few decades now. But, while the 250 GTO and other 1960s models can fetch in excess of $10 million and most other Maranello-built sports cars tend to capture the most attention at auction events, some Ferraris aren’t that popular among collectors. Like any other automaker, Ferrari developed and sold a number of models that had very little in common with its heritage except for the Prancing Horse on the nose. One such vehicle was the 400/412 series built between 1976 and 1989.

Although its ancestor list includes the 365, 330, and the iconic 250 series, the 400 was a significant departure from Ferrari’s classic grand tourer recipe. The 365 GT4 2+2 it evolved from received a three-box design instead of the fastback body style that made 1970 Ferrari models famous and the updated styling of the 400 and 412 turned it into one of the ugliest Ferraris to ever leave Maranello. Sure, it was the late 1970s and manufacturers were into the wedge design, but the 308 GTB and the 512 Berlinetta Boxer were proof that Pininfarina knew how to build gorgeous wedge-shaped sports cars.

The 400 and 412 are perfect examples to illustrate that some Ferraris aren’t desirable, but what happens when you add a unique body style into the mix? Although the 400/412 wasn’t a favorite among coachbuilders, there’s at least one car that received a bespoke body. Meet the Ferrari 412 Pavesi Ventorosso, a unique convertible that just surfaced the Internet and it’s looking for a new owner.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1989 Ferrari 412 Pavesi Ventorosso.

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1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR

1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR

What you’re looking at here is a 1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR that has a bit of a history – in a good way. This particular car was delivered in 1995 as supercup and eventually homologated into GT Championship racing as a 3.8 RSR. The car continued racing in GT Championship until 2002, when it was then used for club and historic races. If you’re wondering about race wins, this car recently won the 2015 FFSA GT Classic championship, beating out cars like the 993 GT2 and even the Dodge Viper.

Included with the purchase of this car, and available for inspection, are maintenance invoices dating back to 2010 that show $109,000 worth of maintenance over the past 6 years. Both the engine and transmission were completely rebuilt during a detailed inspection back in October of 2015, and results from an engine dyno test are available. Items like the shocks and the clutch all have less than eight hours of use on them, and as you can tell from the images, the car is in great condition inside and out.

So, now that we’ve covered a little history of this 993, 3.8 RSR, let’s dive into it and take a closer look at this car and what is so great about it.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR.

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1985 Mercedes Benz 190E 2.3-16V

1985 Mercedes Benz 190E 2.3-16V

It looks a little silly at first glance, a compact mid-Eighties Mercedes sedan with fender flares and wings bolted to it. The Cosworth-modified Mercedes 190E 2.3-16v set the template for an entire generation of The Fast and The Furious-inspired cars.

This hot rod sedan may seem a bit out of character for Mercedes, especially in its wildly aggressive final form, but it’s got a very important place in the flow of automotive history: many people agree that this is the car that officially kicked off the German horsepower wars. It’s definitely responsible for the BMW M3, because BMW put that car on the road as a direct response to the 190E 2.3-16v.

As with many car stories, it all begins with racing. Mercedes started out looking for a sensible replacement for the 450SLC that was its entry in international rally racing. Teaming up with Cosworth was a sensible way to go about it, and the W201-chassis 190E underwent a comprehensive makeover in 1984. And then the Audi Quattro happened. The all-wheel drive car took the rally world by storm, so Mercedes changed its focus to the German Touring Car Championship. The 190E was modified and did a successful turn in the series, racking up 42 victories over its life span. As regulations required, the car was also homologated for road use, resulting in the 190E 2.3-16v Cosworth.

And with that, a long-standing competition was born. As BMW developed the M3, the 190E 2.3-16v became more extreme as well. In its final form in 1990 as the 190E 2.5-16v Evo II, it looked and sounded like a DTM car for the street. Though the 190E 2.3-16v was only officially sold in the United States in 1986 and 1987, the hot-rodded 190E models helped to spawn a generation of legendary super-sedans.

Continue reading to learn more about the Mercedes Benz 190E 2.3-16V.

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1967 Ferrari Thomassima II

1967 Ferrari Thomassima II

Although it’s no longer popular in the 21st century, coachbuilding was a very active niche of the automotive industry until a few decades ago, with companies like Ghia, Zagato, Bertone, and Frua building customizing anything from luxury vehicles to sports cars. Most of them are unique and fetch ridiculous amounts at auctions, especially Ferraris, which change owners for millions of dollars.

However, while custom-built Ferraris such as the 250 Europa Coupe by Vignale or the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Speciale by Bertone have achieved cult status, not all unique Ferraris are as celebrated. The list of largely forgotten creations also includes the Thomassima, a trio of heavily modified Ferraris built by Tom Meade in the 1960s.

Born in Hollywood and raised in Australia and Hawaii, Meade spent most of the 1960s in Italy sourcing parts for his projects. Between 1962 and 1969, he built the Thomassima I, II, and III. While the first car was lost in a flood and the third one is being display at the Ferrari Museum in Modena, the Thomassima II was considered lost since 1971. Come 2015, the car resurfaced in the U.S. and it’s being sold on eBay.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1967 Ferrari Thomassima.

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For Sale: Ex-NASCAR Toyota Tundra Tuned For Autocross

For Sale: Ex-NASCAR Toyota Tundra Tuned For Autocross

Ever want to buy a NASCAR race truck? Of course you have; because what truck guy wouldn’t want a 700-horsepower, race slicks-wearing, fully caged Camping World-class truck? Well this Toyota Tundra is for sale – and at the decent price of $49,995.

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For Sale: Ex-NASCAR Toyota Tundra Tuned For Autocross

For Sale: Ex-NASCAR Toyota Tundra Tuned For Autocross

Ever want to buy a NASCAR race truck? Of course you have; because what truck guy wouldn’t want a 700-horsepower, race slicks-wearing, fully caged Camping World-class truck? Well this Toyota Tundra is for sale – and at the decent price of $49,995.

Located in Moorseville, North Carolina, this full-on race truck comes with all the right equipment to win races. Well, except a qualified driver, pit crew, and someone’s deep pockets. The truck even ships with spare parts including an extra set of wheels and tires and a few spindles.

The truck started life as a Craftsman Series truck with Kyle Busch Motorsports some five years ago. Sadly, there isn’t much the seller knows about the truck’s competitive history and what races it may have won. Nevertheless, it’s a sure bet this Toyota ran some big races in its early days.

Since then, the truck has been tuned to run autocross. Its suspension, fuel system, weight distribution, and carburetor have all been dialed in to run with Porsches, Ferraris, and Corvettes on the twisty stuff. And at the price point this truck is going for, the value seems nearly irresistible.

Continue reading to learn more about the road-racing NASCAR Toyota truck.

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1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale is a rolling piece of Italian car design history. Unlike the sportier and more popular 105 and 115 GTs, GTVs and GTAs that replaced it, it’s more of a pocket-sized grand touring car than it is a sport coupe. The product of Carrozzeria Bertone, its mid-century, space-age shape was the result of lessons learned from the super-aerodynamic Alfa Romeo-Bertone Berlinetta Aerodinamica Technica design studies.

Almost visually identical to the Giulietta Sprint Speciale, the Giulia was powered by a slightly larger 1.6-liter engine. The Giulietta was originally conceived to go up against Zagato’s Alfa Romeo Giulietta SZ, which shared similar underpinnings, but the Bertone car’s steel bodywork was too cumbersome to bring the fight to the alloy-bodied Zagato. As a result, the Giulietta’s shortcomings as a sports car precipitated its transformation into the Giulia grand tourer.

Collectors have traditionally ignored the Sprint Speciale twins in favor of the faster and lighter 105s and 115s, but that’s changing quickly as they are recognized, the Giulia in particular, for their jaw dropping looks and capabilities as effortless, back-road touring cars.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale.

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1991 BMW 8 Series By Alpina

1991 BMW 8 Series By Alpina

The BMW 8 Series was a car that never really achieved its full potential. That wasn’t exactly an uncommon thing for a car born in the 80s, and the 8 Series certainly wasn’t a bad car, but it’s difficult to shake the feeling that a V-12 BMW grand touring car should have been something more. And indeed, there was a way to get more from the car, in the form of the Alpina B12. This was a tuned version of the E31 8 Series, with more power and a more luxurious interior.

The downside is that it’s quite rare, being a tuned version of a car that was never produced in huge numbers in the first place. But one has just turned up for sale in Evans City, Pennsylvania, and according to the ad, it’s one of only two in the US. And this particular 1991 model was imported from Japan. It has been quite well taken care of, with only 28,000 miles on the clock, but it’s a difficult call as to whether it would be worth buying.
Continue reading to learn more about the BMW 8 Series By Alpina.

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2013 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe Turbo RSPEC For Sale

2013 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe Turbo RSPEC For Sale

Relatively speaking, Hyundai hasn’t gotten a lot of love in the tuning community, with far more attention paid to products hailing from Japan rather than Korea. But sprinkled among the high-profile Toyotas, Hondas, and Subarus of sport compact culture, you can still find a few examples of Seoul’s finest. Take the above-featured Genesis Coupe: it’s got tons of tasteful exterior mods, enough in-car entertainment to satisfy the more discerning audiophiles out there, and even a little go to match the show. And now, it’s up for sale for just $32,000.

That might seem like a lot for a 3-year-old two-door, but considering the plethora of high-quality aftermarket parts, show-winning fit and finish, and 850 miles on the odometer, it starts to make sense.

The exterior has been upgraded with components that enhance the natural bodylines, rather than overruling them. In the corners, there are metal fender flares from TS Designs as created by Jon Sibal. There’s also an APR carbon-fiber splitter from APR, carbon-fiber side and rear lip kit from Seibon, custom headlights with V-LEDs, and an Atlantis Blue Metallic paint job by Auto Explosion.

Inside, you’ll find Recaro seats, Katzkin leather and suede upholstery, Takata race harnesses, and a custom harness car. BP Auto Sound did the stereo with Alpine components, including an INE-W927HD head unit, SPR-60C two-way speaker system, and two 10-inch subs. EFX was called upon for wiring.

Upping the performance specs is an AEM CAI and ARK exhaust. Brembo brakes, Whiteline sway bars, and an ARK strut bar. KW coilovers set the stance.

It’s an older car, but practically brand new in terms of mileage, and outfitted with quality parts. What a beautiful rig — a bargain at twice the price!

Continue reading to learn more about the Hyundai Genesis Coupe Turbo RSPEC.

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2007 Porsche 911 GT3 by Vollkemmen Design

2007 Porsche 911 GT3 by Vollkemmen Design

When the 2007 GT3 997 hit the streets, it bore the most powerful atmospheric engine Porsche had ever created. With 415 horsepower on tap from a howling 3.6-liter, flat-six motor that revs all the way a lofty 8,400 rpm, there’s plenty of straight-line speed. Complimenting this is a suspension setup that’s clearly well designed for attacking split times. However, that ferocity on the track belies the GT3’s docility around town. The amount of practicality Porsche managed to get away with in the 997 is quite surprising, given the pure performance intentions behind the car’s design. While not necessarily a daily driver, the 997 is still capable of picking up a gallon of milk without completely curdling one’s innards. But really, who cares about all that? This speed weapon from Stuttgart is beyond such menial tasks. Instead, owners should shower it with full–throttle salutes, at-limit cornering, and expensive go-faster parts.

Clearly, the current owner of this particular 997 agrees.

Listed for sale at Porsche enthusiast website Rennlist, this GT3 is simply dripping with high-end modifications. It’s also an award winner, collecting such accolades as Car and Driver’s “45 Cars You Must See from SEMA 2014”, and “Best Aftermarket Porsche” from DrivingLine. And with only 14,450 miles on the odometer, it’s practically brand new.

The owner clearly picked a good platform for his project. The 997 is one of the best-selling Porsches of all time. Even renowned Porsche-hater Jeremy Clarkson can’t deny it’s tantalizing appeal.

With such a good starting point, how can anyone expect to make improvements without utterly ruining it? Make the jump to find out.

Click past the jump to read more about this highly modified 2007 Porsche 911 GT3.

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2009 Hummer H2 SUT 6-Wheeler

2009 Hummer H2 SUT 6-Wheeler

Well, Mercedes-Benz did it with the G-Wagon, so why not modify a Hummer H2 SUT with an extra axle, two extra wheels, and an extra-long bed to cover it all? Yep, extra, or perhaps excess are the operative words. This massive beast actually for sale in the everything-is-bigger state of Texas for an equally large $98,950.

The vehicle started life as a standard H2 SUT with its Chevy Avalanche-like removable mid-gate and fold-flat second row. The one and only owner traded in the Hummer just before an unnamed “custom outfitter/limo company” purchased the truck. That company completed all the modifications to the frame, suspension, and body, along with the military-spec “Flat Dark Earth” paint color and custom interior job.

Now this H2 SUT six-wheeler is for sale and all it takes is green money. The seller says the vehicle has a clean record and only sports 27,000 miles. Of course with it being a Hummer, it comes with GM’s 6.2-liter V-8 and six-speed automatic transmission. Sadly however, the new rear axle is just for show and doesn’t get power from the engine. The H2 still has its trusty four-wheel-drive system for getting through the rough stuff though.

Click past the jump to read more about the Hummer H2 SUT Luxury.

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1970 - 1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda

1970 - 1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda

The Plymouth Barracuda saga began in 1964 as a fastback coupe based on the Valiant. The first-generation Barracuda was mostly famous for its distinctive wraparound rear glass, but also for being Plymouth’s first sporty, compact vehicle or "pony car." No match for the popular Ford Mustang, the Barracuda was redesigned for 1967, when notchback and convertible versions joined the already familiar fastback. Although still Valiant-based, the second-gen Barracuda received new sheet metal and larger engines, including Chrysler’s 7.2-liter, 440 Commando V-8 and the 7.0-liter, HEMI 426 V-8. The Barracuda reached its popularity peak in the early 1970s, as the heavily redesigned, third-generation model joined the muscle car wars. Longer and wider, the 1970 Barracuda renounced its Valiant roots and adopted an image of its own, while sitting on Chrysler’s new E-body platform.

The third-gen Barracuda also marked the demise of Plymouth’s main weapon against the Ford Mustang. As the oil crisis struck and compression ratios were reduced in performance engines, the nameplate died altogether after the 1974 model year. Fortunately enough, the short-lived HEMI Cuda, sold only in 1970 and 1971, made a huge impact in the muscle car world, enabling the Barracuda moniker to sit alongside the like of the Mustang, Camaro and Challenger at the top of the pony car kingdom. Although the original HEMI died 50 years ago and Plymouth got the axe in 2001, the HEMI Cuda lives on as one of America’s most prized collectible car. Read on to find out what makes the Cuda a special muscle car.

Updated 09/23/2014: A 1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda just popped up at RK Motors for a price of $1,999,990.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1970-1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda

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1998 Porsche 911 ANDIAL 3.8 C2S

1998 Porsche 911 ANDIAL 3.8 C2S

Established in 1975 in Fountain Valley, California, ANDIAL is more than just a tuning house. While the company may not be as famous as Gemballa or TechArt when it comes to beefed-up Porsches, ANDIAL is a big name in racing, helping the Germans win numerous events. Porsche scored six 24 Hours of Daytona victories, four Pikes Peak class titles, the IMSA GT and Supercar Series championships, as well as the SCCA World Challenge using ANDIAL-prepped engines, which says a lot about the California-based tuner. Now a part of Porsche Motorsport North America, who purchased the historic name in 2013, ANDIAL has also delivered some exciting road-going cars over the last two decades. One of them is the 911 3.8 C2S, which was launched in the late 1990s.

Based on the 993-generation 911, the last of the air-cooled 911s, the C2S is the best example of what ANDIAL was capable of back in the day. Don’t mind the lack of visual upgrades, this 911 is about enhanced performance, with all the tweaks operated under the shell. It’s a race car in disguise, one you simply can’t ignore if you’re into true blue sports cars.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1998 Porsche 911 Andial 3.8 C2S.

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2013 Subaru BRZ "Albino Rhino"

2013 Subaru BRZ "Albino Rhino"

I don’t think I’m the only one who has been disappointed with the underwhelming aftermarket programs given to the Subaru BRZ. I’m not expecting anywhere close to the level of a Nissan GT-R, but somewhere with equally impressive performance gains relative to its power wouldn’t hurt. The same disappointing trend continues with the BRZ "Albino Rhino" by RallySport Direct.

To be fair, the BRZ Albino Rhino does have impressive aesthetic and aerodynamic upgrades. I have no issues on how the BRZ looks because it looks incredible. The blue alloy wheels, in particular, are a perfect combination of saucy and sexy.

The issue here is the engine upgrade, which isn’t really much, if I’m being honest. RallySport Direct added a Vortech supercharger, which sounds really nice, but at the end of the day, even the supercharger upgrade wasn’t enough to give the BRZ "Albino Rhino" the kind of power its animal namesake is famous for.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2013 Subaru BRZ "Albino Rhino".

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1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33

1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33

While Ferrari needs no introduction, Brabham is a name some of you might not remember so well. Founded by Jack Brabham, who died earlier this year aged 88, and Ron Tauranac, Brabham spend three decades in Formula One, in which it won four drivers’ championships and two constructors’ titles. Its first successful campaigns, and the only ones to bring both the drivers’ and constructors’ championship, came in 1966 and 1967. Although it won two more drivers’ titles, Brabham failed to win the constructors’ championship for the third time. However, the Brits came close on many occasions. 1970 was an important year for Brabham. Although it only managed fourth position at the end of the season, the team lost its number one driver, Jack Brabham. The man that drove the race cars built by his own hands retired from racing following the Mexican Grand Prix. The 1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33 was the last F1 car he had driven during an official event, making it that much more important to the company, second to only the Repco-powered single-seaters that brought the 1966 and 1967 championships.

In this car, Brabham won one race and scored three more podiums, while teammate Rolf Stommelen added a further third-place finish. Brabham, one of eight teams to use Ford’s DFV engine that year, ended the season behind Lotus, Ferrari and March, but ahead of McLaren, BRM and Matra. What made the BT33 such a competitive racer? Read on to find out.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33.

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1970 Ford Torino King Cobra Prototype

1970 Ford Torino King Cobra Prototype

Ford Motor Company has been synonymous with racing ever since the early days for the Model T, but no era brought as much success as the 1960s. By 1969, Ford already had four consecutive 24 Hours of Le Mans wins with the GT40, while the Mustang was putting up a good fight in the Trans-Am series. The Blue Oval also dominated the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, as the almighty Torino Talladega had won the championship in both 1968 and 1969.

However, with Dodge and its Charger Daytona growing increasingly stronger throughout 1969, Ford planned to bring its very own "aero warrior" to the party in the form of a modified, much more aerodynamic Torino. Thus the King Cobra was born, a prototype motivated by the famous Boss 429 engine and capable of delivering enormous amounts of downforce on the oval track. Unfortunately, as NASCAR increased the minimum number of cars produced for the public from 500 to 3,000 for a vehicle to qualify for the Sprint Cup, Ford abandoned the project and left Dodge and Plymouth to dominate the series for the next three years.

44 years later (as of 7/7/2014), the Torino King Cobra prototype resurfaced to regain its glory as a near-mint, classic collectible with an intriguing story attached to its name.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1970 Ford Torino King Cobra.

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1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda Convertible

1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda Convertible

The early 1970s was a grand time for American muscle cars with plenty of iconic iron rolling off the Big Three’s assembly lines. But few cars have reached the level of rarity as the Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda. Production numbers of these legendary street machines were rather low compared to other muscle cars of the era. In the case of this particular ‘Cuda and its combination of options, the number is one.

Yes, out of the total 16,159 Barracudas sold in 1971, only 11 were fitted with the sportiest ‘Cuda option powered by the 426 Hemi and ordered as convertibles. Of those 11 cars, only three came with the four-speed manual transmission. Over 40 years later, one — yes o-n-e — B5-coded “Bright Blue” ‘Cuda is the only numbers-matching, 426 Hemi-powered, four-speed, convertible in existence. Talk about rare.

Updated 06/16/2014: This very cool Hemi Cuda Convertible was auctioned during this week-end’s auctions at Mecum for the amazing amount of $3,500,000.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1971 Plymouth Hemi ’Cuda Convertible.

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1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi

1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi

It all started in 1956 when wealthy American businessman Tony Parravano hired the Italian manufacturer, Maserati to develop a new V-8 for use in the chassis of the Kurtis Indy. Maserati saw the opportunity to revive the project codenamed Tipo 54 and develop its own engine for use its sport-specific chassis. The original car carrying a V-6 engine with chassis number 3501 became the test bed for the car ordered by the American.

The 450S made its first appearance at the Swedish Grand Prix’s practice session in August 1956, stunning everyone with its tremendous acceleration and top speed. The car clocked the third best timing in the practice, but the underdeveloped car could not handle the vibrations resonating from the wrong firing order of the engine’s spark plugs. Afterwards, the 450S received a new chassis at Mondena factory.

The development continued and in 1957, the new production 450S was rolled out to have its maiden race at the 1000 km of Buenos Aires where it led the Ferrari twin-cam sports car by 10 seconds. The car suffered from a failed transmission and retired from the race. However, the car went on to claim its first ever podium finish in the 1957 Swedish GP. Sadly, FIA changed the rules next year, making 450S ineligible for the Grand Prix.

The car was quickly prepared for the 1956 Mille Miglia 1,000-mile race. Legendary driver Stirling Moss, along with Denis Jenkinson as navigator, experienced a brake failure and the car came to rest against a tree. Driver and co-driver walked away without a scratch, but the car had to return to the factory for repairs and further development.

Fantuazzi then came into picture when he designed a new body with a contoured design. The car also got a longer wheelbase to accommodate the new V-8 engine. The updated vehicle was tested in the Swedish Grand Prix in August 1956 where the car’s builders continued to tweak is new chassis and make improvements.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi.

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