Cars Caterham

Caterham

Caterham

Models
Body styles
Topics
Vehicle Types
Filters: Styles Topics
view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
2017 Caterham Seven Harrods Special Edition

2017 Caterham Seven Harrods Special Edition

Caterham launches Caterham Signature, the company’s first personalization program

Arguably one of the most iconic sports car ever built, the Seven has been around for nearly six decades. Launched in 1957 by Lotus, the marque was later purchased by Caterham, which introduced its very own take on the roadster in 1973. Although Caterham refined the design, introduced new materials, and better engines, the Seven soldiered on into the 21st century mostly unchanged, being built on the same recipe that automotive genius Colin Chapman outlined in the 1950s.

The current Seven lineup includes no fewer than six road-going models, but Caterham has also launched several special-edition roadsters in recent years. In October 2016, the British firm unveiled yet another special Seven, dubbed Harrods Edition. As the name suggests, it is inspired by Britain’s upmarket department store, but what’s more important here is that the Harrods Edition marks the debut of Caterham Signature, the company’s first personalization program.

Available exclusively at Harrods, the Harrods Edition includes a host of special features which "demonstrate the breadth of options new Caterham buyers can add to their vehicles." Extra features include paint colors and designs, dashboard and interior styling, embroidery, and even the color of the chassis.

"The Caterham Seven has always been one of the easiest cars on the road to personalize, because every car is hand-built and bespoke for each customer. But now we’ve formalized the personalization options available to our customers into the Caterham Signature program, which will outline the almost infinite combinations of options you can select. You can even have your name stitched into the seat," said David Ridley, Caterham’s chief commercial officer.

Continue reading to learn more about the Caterham Seven Harrods Special Edition.

Read more
Caterham Seven Sprint Sold Out In 7 Days

Caterham Seven Sprint Sold Out In 7 Days

All 60 units of the retro-inspired Seven are gone

Earlier this month, Caterham unveiled the Sprint, a limited-edition of the Seven paying tribute to the original car built by Colin Chapman in the 1950s. Only a week has passed since the Sprint revealed its retro-inspired look to the world, and all 60 units have been sold, making it one of the quickest-selling sports cars launched in recent years.

The achievement is that much more impressive given that Caterham sells around 500 cars per year, which means that the Sprint helped the company sell more than 10 percent of its annual sales figure in just a week. And all this while the Sprint, which is based on the entry-level Seven 160, was priced at £27,995, or as much as a more powerful, better equipped Seven 420.

"We have been overwhelmed with the response to the Sprint. We knew of course it was a great product but the reaction we got is unprecedented. It’s been the perfect scene-setter to our 60 Years of Seven celebrations," said David Ridley, Caterham’s chief commercial officer.

Despite all 60 units being already accounted for, customers may still have a chance to purchase a Sprint. According to the brand, not all have been sold to customers, with a few examples set to be delivered to British and European dealers. While this may be great news for enthusiasts that didn’t manage to place an order in time, the remaining Sprints are likely to be sold with a massive premium. It has happened in the past with rare, limited-edition models, and the Seven Sprint is likely to have a similar fate.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
Here's a Caterham Seven you can actually afford

Here’s a Caterham Seven you can actually afford

Build your own Seven from LEGO bricks for less than $100

Caterham is one of the very few automakers that offer its vehicles as kits that you can assemble yourself. You can do this with basically every Seven currently on offer, except the new, limited-edition Sprint and the track-ready 620R. Actually, as of October 2016 you’ll be able to build your own 620R too, but you’ll have to settle for a LEGO set in order to do that.

Caterham has just announced that the 620R has become its first-ever vehicle to be immortalized in LEGO form. The extreme sports car was recently submitted to the LEGO Ideas platform, a process that all models have to go through in order to be selected for production, and gained the required 10,000 votes from LEGO fans around the world.

The set consists of 771 pieces, including a replica 620R engine and gear stick, while the assembled model car stands 10 cm (3.9 inches) tall and 28 cm (11 inches) long. Features include a removable nose, removable engine hood, opening trunk, and a working steering wheel. Pricing is set at £69 in the United Kingdom and at $79.99 in the United States. Quite affordable compared to the real thing, which retails from £44,995.

Caterham is pretty enthusiastic about the 620R being picked as the next LEGO set and jokes about how its technicians downed their tools to pickup up the plastic and created the model together with LEGO. It even describes the tiny 620R as capable of reaching "a heart-racing top speed of 6mph."

“Caterham has always prided itself on producing bespoke, hand-built cars for its customers. Our army of fans who build their own Caterham Sevens are equally discerning when it comes to the detail and craftsmanship which is central to Caterham, and we worked closely with the LEGO team to ensure the LEGO model replicated that," said Caterham chief commercial officer, David Ridley.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
2017 Caterham Seven Sprint

2017 Caterham Seven Sprint

Caterham pays tribute to the original Lotus Seven with vintage-looking limited-edition

While most automobile nameplates are usually split into generations, it’s impossible to do the same with the Caterham Seven. Ever since the British firm bought the rights to the Seven marque in 1973, the lightweight roadster has changed very little design-wise, with its most important upgrades lying underneath the bodywork. And, while the current model is definitely a big step forward technology wise, it’s difficult to describe it as being part of a certain generation. What we do know for a fact is that the Seven has become a full-fledged family of cars in recent years, being available in six different versions, not including the race-spec models. In 2017, Caterham celebrates 60 years since Lotus first introduced the nameplate with a limited-edition variant called the Seven Sprint.

Based on the entry-level Seven 160, the Sprint is described as a variant of the Seven that "was seemingly planned in the mid-1960s but never launched." Caterham is likely referring to the Sprint being part of Lotus’ plans for the sports car, but cancelled for various reasons. What’s important here to know for historical reasons, is that the Sprint celebrates 60 years since Lotus introduced the Seven nameplate in 1957. For those of you who aren’t very familiar with the Seven’s history, Caterham bought the rights to the sports car from Lotus in 1973, when it started making its own version. Some 44 years have passed, and Caterham looked back upon the original Seven and created a vintage-looking, limited-edition model for die-hard enthusiasts.

"We have always prided ourselves on continually developing the Seven during the 44 years we have been custodian of the model. But we never wished to dismiss our heritage either and I know there are plenty of Seven purists and aficionados out there who will really appreciate the level of detail we’ve gone to with the Sprint to resurrect the spirit of those early cars," said Graham Macdonald, Caterham Cars CEO.

Continue reading to learn more about the Caterham Seven Sprint.

Read more
This is How Caterham's Alpine Coupe Twin Was Supposed To Look Like

This is How Caterham’s Alpine Coupe Twin Was Supposed To Look Like

Definitely sexier than its French counterpart

Back in 2011, Alpine announced that it would produce its first car in two decades as part of a joint-venture with British sports car firm Caterham. Initially scheduled to arrive in 2015, the new Alpine was delayed after the French company and Caterham decided to drop their partnership, despite having a co-developed vehicle in the works. And, while Alpine continued to develop its own version of the sports car, Caterham’s design never made it into the spotlight. Until today, when Drive, the design firm that sketched the sports car, decided to share the story and some photos from their studio.

Dubbed C120, Caterham’s version of the sports car was designed in the same studio as the AS1. Drive’s team of designers and digital modelers were given a space within Alpine’s design office, which lead to the C120 and AS1 clay models facing each other in the same room. Not surprisingly, they share the overall proportion and some styling features, but at the same time they sport unique cues of their own.

While the Alpine obviously draws cues from the iconic A110, Caterham’s take on the project is unlike any other model they’ve produced so far. Which makes sense actually, as every Caterham to date was based on the Seven. Granted, the front grille and positioning of the headlamps remind me of the Seven to some extent, but everything else is new. Around back, the C120 shares many elements with the AS1, such as the slender taillights and trapezoidal diffuser insert, but other than that, they are quite different, as in the Caterham uses a more conventional engine lid with a rectangular glass area rather than Alpine’s wraparound windscreen.

Moving onto the sides, the Caterham features more muscular fenders and a larger quarter glass, and a more fastback roofline toward the rear. The C-pillar is also thicker, giving it a sportier look. The front fascia also seems more aggressive thanks to its big main, Seven-inspired grille and large outlets under each headlamp. All told, the C120 feels more modern and balanced than the Alpine, and it’s also more exciting to look at.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
2017 Caterham Seven 310

2017 Caterham Seven 310

Aftermarket engine upgrade spawns new Seven model; expands lineup to six models

Introduced in 1973, when Caterham bought the rights to the design from Lotus, who had produced the sports car since 1957, the Caterham Seven soldiered on mostly unchanged until the 21st century. Of course, Caterham refined the design, introduced new materials, and better engines, but overall, the Seven is being built on the same recipe that Colin Chapman outlined 60 years ago.

Caterham indeed made an important change recently, but it has nothing to do with the lightweight architecture or its classic styling. The Brits turned the Seven into a proper family of sports cars, adding numerous street and track-only versions. The Seven 310 is the latest to join the lineup and expands the number of road-legal offerings to no fewer than six.

Described as a "perfect balance of power and confidence-inspiring handling characteristics" that harken back to the Superlight R300 model, the Seven 310 is heavily based on the 270 model. And by "heavily based" I mean that it is essentially a 270 with an upgraded engine. Caterham says the 310 was born out of a "happy accident" when the company took the upgrade engine, which was destined to be an aftermarket option, to the streets, realizing that it would make for a great production model.

“It’s entirely fitting that the Seven 310, which we feel perfectly synchronizes power and handling, has come out of the motorsport engineering process. This car will be loved by Caterham enthusiasts but will also convert car fans in general who understand that creating a genuinely fun driving experience is not about simply adding more and more power; that often, less is more," said Simon Lambert, chief of motorsport and technical officer for Caterham.

Keep reading to learn all about the Caterham Seven 310

Read more
Caterham Will Use Bicycle Technology To Cut Weight

Caterham Will Use Bicycle Technology To Cut Weight

Century old bicycle technology may provide a stronger and lighter chassis for the Caterham Seven

Caterham has teamed up CAE consultant Simpact and bicycle tube-makers Renolds Technology to build a new lightweight frame for the Caterham Seven. It almost seems like a backward step in technology, but this new frame is actually made using the same butted tube technology used to build bicycles – a process that was patented by Renolds Technology back in 1897. According to the trio, the new frame design shaves 10 percent of the weight from the Seven’s chassis, and up to 50 percent of mass from some parts without any sacrifice to the chassis’ torsional stiffness or strength.

A prototype Caterham Seven debuted at the Niche Vehicle Network Symposium earlier this month, and from the look of things, the technology is almost ready to shift into production models. Caterham says optioning for this new lightweight frame on future Seven models should cost between £1,000 and £2,000. At current exchange rates, that would mean a premium somewhere between $1,444 and $2,889.

The CTO of Caterham Cars, Simon Lambert, said, "Caterham and Reynolds are two proudly British brands, and there is a real synergy between customers of Caterham and cycling enthusiasts, so it’s even better that the technology that has made this possible has come from the two-wheeled world."

According to Caterham, the technology can even be adopted by other companies that are currently using space frames. For now, the British automaker will continue to develop the prototype that debuted earlier this month, with a view to launch a production model using the new frame technology in “due course.”

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
2016 Caterham Seven 620S

2016 Caterham Seven 620S

In 2013, Caterham launched the Seven 620R as the most extreme Seven in the nameplate’s storied history. More than two years have passed, and the 620R is still the quickest Seven you can drive on public roads, returning supercar-like sprints and featuring the same iconic bodywork Colin Chapman designed in the 1950s. Starting in 2016, however, the 620R is no longer alone at the top of the Seven lineup. Joining in is the 620S, a more road-oriented version that’s part of Caterham’s recent reorganization of its sports car stable.

As you may remember, the Brits decided to rename most of its models so that all Sevens are identified by their horsepower outputs, as well as introduce two performance packs, S and R, for each version. With the 620 already being available in the extreme R configuration, Caterham launched a slightly milder version, wearing a "620S" badge. And by milder I mean a roadster that’s a bit more comfortable as a daily driver, but not less powerful, as the 620S uses the same powerplant as its range-topping sibling. The former is significantly slower though due to its less sporty transmission, but you’ll have to keep reading to find out more about that.

The bad news here is that, just like the 620R, the 620S won’t be sold in the United States. Although some models are available on these shores via Superformance, the 620 series won’t cross the pond to North America anytime soon.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2016 Caterham 620S.

Read more
2016 Caterham Superlight Twenty

2016 Caterham Superlight Twenty

2015 has been a busy year for Caterham thus far, as the Brits updated the Roadsport, Superlight, and Supersport versions of the Seven, while also renaming them based on the same power-to-weight ratio used for the entry-level 2014 Caterham Seven 160 and range-topping 2013 Caterham Seven 620R models. Also, Caterham introduced a choice of two performance packs for each model. Now that the new 2015 Caterham Seven 270, 2015 Caterham Seven 360, and 2015 Caterham Seven 420 are already in showrooms, the brand is launching yet another new car.

Meet the Superlight Twenty, the limited-edition, track-ready model built to celebrate an iconic sports car from the 1990s.

Packed with several carbon-fiber body parts and an array of suspension updates, the Twenty comes to the market as the spiritual successor of the Superlight 1.6. Launched in 1996 as an even lighter, more powerful, yet more affordable version of the Seven, the Superlight 1.6 will celebrate its 20th anniversary in 2016. With the Twenty, Caterham aims to celebrate the two decades since it introduced the car became one of the company’s most coveted models, while also inspiring the development of current products.

The Superlight Twenty will debut at the 2015 Goodwood Revival before it goes on sale later this year in the United Kingdom. Unfortunately, it won’t be offered in the U.S.

Continue reading to learn more about the Caterham Superlight Twenty.

Read more
2015 Caterham Seven 360 R

2015 Caterham Seven 360 R

Replaces the previous 360, adds more power, new features, and more options

Launched in 1973, after Caterham Cars purchased the rights for the roadster from Lotus, the Seven has soldiered on with few changes until 2015. Granted, the sports car received increasingly modern engines and state-of-the-art lightweight materials such as carbon-fiber, but from a design standpoint, the modern-day Seven is very similar to the car introduced more than four decades ago. For 2015, Caterham launched more updates and simplified the Seven lineup to five core models, all available with the new S and R equipment packages.

Among them there’s the 2015 Seven 360 R takes all that is good in the standard 360 and turns the dial up a bit. Sure, there are no massive drivetrain updates, but Caterham worked hard in other areas to make the 360 R a more track-ready machine. The best (or possibly the worst, depending on how you look at it) part about the 360 R is that it is almost a secret, because the updates are quite subtle and require a careful eye to spot.

Not available in the United States for the time being, the Seven 360 slots between the 270 and the 480 models. It uses a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine and much like other modern Sevens, it can be equipped with an extensive range of options. Have a look at the review below for more info on that.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2015 Caterham Seven 360 R.

Read more
2015 Caterham Seven 270

2015 Caterham Seven 270

It’s not often that we see a small manufacturer such as Caterham launch more than a couple of new models a year, but the Brits have outdone themselves in 2015 by introducing no fewer than three Seven cars. At the same time! Initially announced back in December 2014, the new models come to replace the Roadsport, Superlight, and Supersport models, but the big news here is that Caterham renamed them based on their power-to-weight ratios, resulting in a less confusing naming strategy that will make things a lot more simple for customers, especially those not very familiar with the Caterham brand and its products.

Having already taken a deep dive into the 420 model (not to be confused with the U.S.-spec 480), it’s time to take a closer look at the Seven 270, which replaces the Roadsport 125 and slots between the entry-level 160 and the 360. The 270 brings many updates over its predecessor and benefits from the company’s new equipment packages that turn the sports car into either a daily driver or a more track-focused machine. Find out more in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2015 Caterham Seven 270.

Read more
2015 Caterham Seven 420

2015 Caterham Seven 420

Headquartered in Crawley, Sussex, British sports car manufacturer Caterham has made its iconic open-wheel racer, the Seven, since 1973. The original philosophy was simple: create a performance vehicle that was accessible, minimalistic, and most importantly, lightweight. As a continuation of that mantra, Caterham recently unveiled three new additions to its lineup, including the Seven 270, the Seven 360, and, pictured above, the Seven 420. All are currently available in the UK, and have optional “S” and “R” equipment packages specifically tailored for added streetability (“S”) or enhanced racing prowess (“R”).

The new models condense Caterham’s offerings to five core vehicles, with the pre-existing entry-level Seven 160 and supercharged 620R bookending the catalog. The 420 sits between the road-and-track-balanced 360 and the 620, offering more speed than the lesser models, while retaining decent drivability and accessibility. “While still being built around Colin Chapman’s ethos of ‘add lightness,’ the Seven 420 adds something else too… additional horsepower,” says Caterham.

Like the rest of the Seven model range, the base 420 strips out all “unnecessary comforts” to deliver “pure, unadulterated driving thrills.” It’s a formula that’s time-tested and competition-proven. However, even with its undeniable track record, one can’t help but think the design is getting a bit long in the tooth. So then – can the new model still deliver the goods, even in 2015?

Continue reading to learn more about the Caterham Seven 420.

Read more
Caterham Plans Three New Seven Variants for 2015

Caterham Plans Three New Seven Variants for 2015

Cadillac and Mercedes-Benz aren’t the only automakers looking to revamp their lineups with new naming schemes. Caterham is at it as well, with three new Seven variants to be launched in 2015 in order to simplify its lineup. Simply put, the Brits are upgrading the Roadsport, Superlight and Supersport versions of the Seven and using the occasion to rename them based on the same power-to-weight ratio used for the entry-level 160 and range-topping 620R models.

According to Autocar, the new models will receive engine upgrades as well as a host of styling changes compared to the models they replace. Of the three, only the Superlight R400 has its power-to-weight ratio figure listed in its name. The 210-horsepower sports car boasts 400 ponies per metric ton. Roadsport models are identified by their horsepower outputs — 125 and 140 — while the Supersport is sold as base and R spec.

Caterham also plans to offer a choice of two performance packs for each model, the source adds. Customers will be able to spec the base car with either an R or an S package, with the latter to be the most extreme. There’s no word on what kind of upgrades these packages will add, but we expect a host of chassis modifications and other race-bred parts.

The Seven CSR, currently the most extreme Seven-based model in the lineup, will continue unchanged as a stand-alone vehicle.

The first of the updated, renamed Seven models is expected to break cover in spring 2015.

Click past the jump to read more about the Caterham Seven.

Read more
2015 Caterham Seven 360

2015 Caterham Seven 360

Designed by automotive genius Colin Chapman and launched in 1957 under the Lotus badge, the Seven has become one of the most iconic sports cars ever built. Sold as a Lotus until 1972 and as a Caterham since 1973, the tiny, no-nonsense Seven has been offered in many configurations. However, the little roadster has yet to lose its classic charm, despite being fitted with modern technology and increasingly powerful engines. Although the Seven lineup has included at least four to five models over the last decade, Caterham has yet to bring it to the United States on official terms. The drama ended in January 2014, when the Brits reached an agreement with Superformance, and the first U.S.-spec Sevens appeared on the company’s drawing board. In August 2014, Caterham finally announced that the Seven will hit U.S. shores in part-built form.

Two versions are now offered Stateside, being set apart by the number of horses hiding under the hood. The base model is the Seven 360, similar in specifications with the Roadsport 175 currently sold in the United Kingdom. Hopefully we’ll get to drive one and share our impressions soon enough. Meanwhile, make sure you check out the in-depth review below.

Click past the jump to read more about the Caterham Seven 360

Read more
Renault-Caterham Joint Venture Dropped; Each Company will Build its Own Sports Car

Renault-Caterham Joint Venture Dropped; Each Company will Build its Own Sports Car

The Renault-Caterham joint venture has officially been dissolved. It was a nice plan at first, but like a lot of nice plans, this one sputtered and died before anything great could come from it. The two sides decided on an amicable split two years after joining forces on what was initially planned as the rebirth of the Alpine brand. The companies were so dedicated at one point, they went so far as to co-found Société des Automobiles Alpine Caterham with the intention of launching a pair of similarly styled sports cars by 2016.

But somewhere along the way, the relationship between the two companies disintegrated. It even came to a point where disagreements on the development of the sports cars caused significant delays. So instead of soldiering on and squashing the tensions between the two sides, both companies chose to drop the project entirely and go their separate ways.

Renault has since acquired full ownership of Société des Automobiles Alpine Caterham and dropped "Caterham" from the official company name. Both companies are moving forward in building new sports cars but will do so independently.

A lot of people, including us, are understandably disappointed that the Renault-Caterham marriage didn’t work. It really had so much promise at the beginning. The thought of a shared sports car that incorporated the Renault Alpine A110-50 Concept had a lot of people in the industry at attention, wondering what these companies could create together.

Surprisingly, there are no hard feelings, as the two brands still plan to work together through "other forms of cooperation," but it doesn’t sound as exciting as building a sports car together.

Oh, well. So much for that.

Click past the jump to read more about Renault-Caterham’s joint venture.

Read more
2014 Caterham Seven Kamui Kobayashi Special Edition

2014 Caterham Seven Kamui Kobayashi Special Edition

When it comes to cars that deliver pure driving pleasure, the Caterham Seven is tough to beat. Maybe this is why the roadster has used the same recipe for more than 50 years. Caterham has been working to improve it since 1973, but we mustn’t forget that Colin Chapman, who built the first Lotus 7 in 1957, penned the Seven. It’s true that the technology behind it has changed over the decades, but Chapman’s iconic "simplify, then add lightness" philosophy remained printed in the Seven’s DNA. Caterham sells a host of iterations nowadays, ranging from the bone-stock 165 model to the lightning-fast 620 R, but, from time to time, it also releases special-edition models that become prized collectibles.

For instance, the Brits created quite a stir with the Seven JPE, a Vauxhall-powered Seven developed with input from F1 driver Jonathan Palmer and launched in 1993. More than 20 years have passed since then, and Caterham turned to another Formula One driver to create a new limited edition track rocket. This time it was Kamui Kobayashi’s turn, a Caterham F1 Team ace that has five Grand Prix seasons to his name.

As with most Caterham special editions, the Kobayashi Seven is gifted with a unique appearance and the latest tricks in carbon-fiber embellishment. It packs the same no-nonsense attitude present in all Caterham-badged vehicles and it has everything it needs to make a petrol-head grovel at its wheels. There is a catch though; the possibility that we may never see one blow past us on the highway is very low. But you’ll have to join us in our in-depth trip to find out why.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Caterham Seven Kamui Kobayashi Special Edition.

Read more
April Fools 2014: TopSpeed's Favorite April Fool's Articles

April Fools 2014: TopSpeed’s Favorite April Fool’s Articles

Ah, April 1st is upon us, and the tom foolery of April Fools day seems to have come to an end. We shared with you our own little April Fool with the "teasing" of the new Barracuda, which was obviously a dolled-up and re-badged Dodge Dart. A few of our colleagues seemed to enjoy our little joke, and we saw a bunch that we loved too.

We saw a Ford SVT Bronco, news that the GT-R Hybrid would debut at the 2014 NYIAS, a new BMW "technology," a sportbrake SRT Viper and many more. Some were great and others were pretty crappy. I may be wrong, but my opinion of a good April Fool is an unbelievable story that you can somehow believe. Things like a four-door Ferrari are overdone and completely obvious, but a story like the Ford SVT Bronco is just believable enough to get you going.

We have queried a few of the TopSpeed editors to find out which piece they enjoyed the most.

Click past the jump to see each of our favorites.

Read more
Report: Renault-Caterham Sports Car Venture is Dead

Report: Renault-Caterham Sports Car Venture is Dead

Well, that was quick, wasn’t it? The joint development deal that was supposed to net two sports cars bearing the same underpinnings under the Renault and Caterham names is apparently over. We reported earlier that there was a riff between the two companies, and according to multiple sources, the two have decided to nix the joint-development deal altogether.

According to these reports, both the Caterham and Renault cars are still on schedule for a 2016 release, but there is no information on whether they will continue to share the same architecture. Earlier reports claimed that Caterham approved a design from Renault, but the French company later tried to stuff the toothpaste back in the tube after customers didn’t respond well to the initial design. The Caterham bosses didn’t take too kindly to this, but they were assured that the project would remain Renault’s No. 1 priority.

Well, with the 50-50 venture now completely off track Caterham is free to continue with its designing process completely free from Renault’s nervous trigger finger.

I have a sneaking suspicion that Renault will eventually pull the plug on its project altogether citing demand issues, and Caterham will modify the car to better match its current design language. This would be a sad ending to a promising campaign, but it seems like Renault lost interest at some point and Caterham really has no need for a sports car like this in its lineup.

Stay tuned to TopSpeed.com for more on this topic.

Click past the jump to read more about Renault - Caterham joint sports car.

Read more
2014 Caterham Seven 160

2014 Caterham Seven 160

Known as the Caterham Seven 165 on the European market, the new Seven 160 is now officially available for order in the UK, and will be put into production in January 2014. The model occupies the entry-level slot in the Caterham Seven lineup, and is priced from £14,995 — about $24,200 at the current exchange rates.

As standard features, the new Seven 160 comes with a set of 14 inches steel wheels combined with a live axle rear suspension. On the inside, the model offers cloth adjustable seats and inertial reel seat belts. For buyers that need a little extra comfort, there are lots of other optional features to choose from.

The new Seven 160 is no powerhouse by any stretch of the imagination, but the 80 ponies that it packs are plenty to get this super-lightweight car to highway speeds in under seven seconds.

Click past the jump to read more about the Caterham Seven 160

Read more
Caterham-Alpine Sports Car Gets "C120" Codename; Launch Date Now At 2016

Caterham-Alpine Sports Car Gets "C120" Codename; Launch Date Now At 2016

The co-developed, A110-50 Concept-inspired sports cars between Caterham and Renault-owned Alpine is quickly shaping up after the final designs for both models have been signed off by company execs.

The two respective models, one carrying a Caterham badge and the other an Alpine badge, are expected to give the two brands their respective stand-alone models. According to Autocar, the launch for both models have been penciled in for 2016 with Caterham even referring to its model as the "C120".

Unlike the Toyota GT86/SubaruBRZ/Scion FR-S trinity that all carried the same styling language, the Caterham and Alpine sports cars will not be rebadged models; both will actually have different bodies and interiors, something Renault design chief, Laurens van den Acker, alluded to when he said that both models will have "completely different impressions that will showcase the best of the two companies."

Performance numbers for both models will likely hit around 250 horsepower, although Caterham has indicated that it could bump its model up to 300 horsepower, all while using the same Renault engine that the Alpine version will carry.

It should get very interesting to see how both brands move forward with their respective iterations of this shared platform. What we do know is that the launch is going to take longer than it was initially planned, which only means that both companies have more time to blow out socks off.

Click past the jump to read about the Renault Alpine A110-50 Concept

Read more
2013 Caterham AeroSeven Concept

2013 Caterham AeroSeven Concept

Caterham’s F1 team hasn’t had the success it probably expected when it signed up to compete in the world’s most prestigious racing series.

So with little to show for at the track, the Malaysian-owned, UK-based company decided to catch some attention this weekend at the Singapore Grand Prix by bringing a new concept called the AeroSeven Concept that it developed with Renault.

On the back, bulging rear wheel arches create an aggressive shoulder, while the exhaust system, which usually has its pipes on the back, has them exiting out of the sides like a hot rod. It’s strange for a Caterham to be described as such, but one look at the AeroSeven Concept and you’ll immediately know that this isn’t exactly what you’d come to expect from the British marque.

On the inside, this model boasts an F1-inspired steering wheel and a fully active Graphical Display Unit.

In terms of drivetrain, the Caterham AeroSeven Concept makes use of an EU-6 compliant, naturally aspirated engine that produces 237 horsepower. The power runs through a six-cog manual gearbox and out to the rear wheels. Thanks to the combination of traction control — a first on a Caterham model — an a new Caterham Engine Management System, which adds in launch control, this compact race can hit 100 km/h (62 mph) in under four seconds.

What’s more, this is not only a concept model, as Caterham plans to release a production model in early 2016. The production model should carry a similar design and a wider range of engine options. More to come on that later.

Click past the jump to read more about the AeroSeven Concept

view all
Read more
2014 Caterham Seven 165

2014 Caterham Seven 165

Caterham is teasing for quite some time now a new entry-level version for its Seven lineup. The model, described as a "uncomplicated, easy to run and, most important of all, an intuitive and exciting drive," will be making its world debut in a prototype version at the 2013 Frankfurt Motor Show. Production version will arrive a few months later and will be put on sale in the Spring of 2014.

The new Caterham Seven 165 will be powered by a 660cc, three-cylinder, turbocharged Suzuki K6A engine that, after some improvements made by Caterham will deliver a total of 80 horsepower and a peak torque of 78 pound-feet.

Caterham promised that the new Seven 165 will be priced under €25,000 ($33,000 at the current exchange rates), while the British market will get a Seven 160 version that will be priced at under £17,000 ($26,000 at the current exchange rates).

Click past the jump to read more about the standard Caterham Seven.

Read more
Caterham Extends Export Market to Italy

Caterham Extends Export Market to Italy

British Sportcar manufacturer, Caterham Cars has announced a deal with Italian importer, Automobil Trivellato, in Este to sell its brand new Euro IV compliant Caterham Seven CSR200 from March 2006.
Capable of slingshotting a driver to 60mph in 3.7 seconds and onto a top speed of 140mph, the new, lightweight and agile Cosworth powered Caterham Seven CSR200 will see the legendary car manufacturer extend the number of countries selling its models to 20 including Dubai, France, Germany, Spain, (...)

Read more