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Chevrolet Bel Air

Chevrolet Bel Air Generations:

1957 Chevrolet Bel Air

1957 Chevrolet Bel Air
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Has there ever been a more iconic American car than the ’57 Chevy Bel Air? Of course there hasn’t, it’s not even close. Not even the Model T is as much a symbol of its age as the Bel Air. It represents American middle class postwar prosperity perfectly, and is a rare example of a car with styling that was exactly in line with contemporary fashion and design. There is something of a downside to this, though. The car has become such an icon that its greatness is now either taken for granted or completely ignored in the belief that its popularity was more about trendy fashion than the car itself.

But, the Bel Air really was a fantastic car, Chevrolet’s top mainstream (defined as “not the Corvette”) offering. And, the generation of the car we’re talking about here actually includes the model years from ’55 to ’57, but styling and options were tweaked each year, and the ’57 is now considered to be the quintessential Bel Air. The car was just the right mix of style, performance and had an appealing price tag. It was a huge hit in showrooms, and was even a much bigger technical achievement than it usually gets credit for.

Continue reading to learn more about the Chevrolet Bel Air.

 

Latest Chevrolet Bel Air news and reviews:

1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible

1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible

One of the best Chevy Classics that money can buy

The Chevy Bel Air was pretty much an instant classic when it hit showrooms back in 1950. The first generation, which ran between 1950 and 1954) sported a revolutionary design, with hardtop models designed as a convertible with a non-removable hard top. It was a design that had been around since the early 1920s, but up until the Bel Air, as well as other models from Chevy and Cadillac, the design hadn’t really seen too much success. The model we’re here to talk about today is a 1957 Bel Air convertible that will be going under the hammer in August of 2016 at the Mecum auction during Monterey Car Week.

This specific model isn’t exactly your everyday ’57 Chevy, though. This thing has gone through restoration, is completely rust free, and has been upgraded with a 5.7-liter Corvette-derived LS1 that is backed by the near bullet-proof 4L60-E four-speed automatic (the modern version of the 700R4 transmission.) Outside of this, there are lots of other goodies and features that make this Bel Air convertible a true one-of-a-kind model. So, let’s get on with my review before I make this introduction just way too long.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible.

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1957 Chevrolet Bel Air

1957 Chevrolet Bel Air

Has there ever been a more iconic American car than the ’57 Chevy Bel Air? Of course there hasn’t, it’s not even close. Not even the Model T is as much a symbol of its age as the Bel Air. It represents American middle class postwar prosperity perfectly, and is a rare example of a car with styling that was exactly in line with contemporary fashion and design. There is something of a downside to this, though. The car has become such an icon that its greatness is now either taken for granted or completely ignored in the belief that its popularity was more about trendy fashion than the car itself.

But, the Bel Air really was a fantastic car, Chevrolet’s top mainstream (defined as “not the Corvette”) offering. And, the generation of the car we’re talking about here actually includes the model years from ’55 to ’57, but styling and options were tweaked each year, and the ’57 is now considered to be the quintessential Bel Air. The car was just the right mix of style, performance and had an appealing price tag. It was a huge hit in showrooms, and was even a much bigger technical achievement than it usually gets credit for.

Continue reading to learn more about the Chevrolet Bel Air.

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 Dr. Phil's `57 Bel Air Stolen from a Repair Shop

Dr. Phil’s `57 Bel Air Stolen from a Repair Shop

If you have a knack for watching daytime TV, you likely know who Doctor Phil is. In fact, even if you don’t watch it, you likely know that he is the over opinionated and sometimes-controversial psychologist that hands out advice to random people on his show.

Little did we know that Dr. Phil is a car nut too, or at least he seems like one, thanks to the 1957 Bel Air convertible he owns. Unfortunately, someone obviously wanted it a little more than him, as the $100,000 drop top – yup, it’s actually worth at least that much on the high end – was the victim of a car thief at a local repair shop.

The Chevy was in the shop for repairing a no-start condition, which proves that the Doc is either too busy to fix it or knows nothing about automotive mechanics, as that should be a simple fix on this all-mechanical car. The police report states that the lock was hacked off of a garage door in the shop and the thief had a clean getaway.

The robber must have either been a mechanic and repaired the vehicle, had a tow truck, or had some help to push this large vehicle out of the shop and to its destination – likely a chop shop somewhere in the local Burbank, CA area.

The car should be relatively easy to spot, as it is a black convertible Bel Air with chrome wheels, wide-whitewall tires, gold badging, and red leather interior — similar to the one above. There is no reward listed, but we’re sure Phil would pony something up for the return of his $100K car.

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2007 Chevrolet Bel Air - Project X

2007 Chevrolet Bel Air - Project X

It has been the subject of more enthusiast magazine build stories than any other car and has graced the cover of Popular Hot Rodding (PHR) countless times. It even played a supporting role in “Hollywood Knights,” serving as the supercharged transportation for Tony Danza and Michelle Pfeiffer.

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