2019 Chevrolet Bolt

2019 Chevrolet Bolt Exclusive Photos High Resolution
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The Bolt in Premium trim
all the bell and wisthles you need

A cool electric car without the hipster tax.

The Chevy Bolt tends to have a bad rap because of the bow-tie emblem; it’s quirky DNA mashup between MPV and hatchback, and the fact that it’s not a Tesla. But, we managed to spend some one-on-one time with the Chevy Bolt and, well, let’s just say that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. Despite the general consensus surrounding GM’s compact EV, and all the hype generated by Tesla, the Bolt has found a place in our hearts. Here’s our story of a simple yet enjoyable getaway with none other than the 2019 Chevy Bolt.

 

Latest Chevrolet Bolt news and reviews:

2019 Chevrolet Bolt

2019 Chevrolet Bolt

A cool electric car without the hipster tax.

The Chevy Bolt tends to have a bad rap because of the bow-tie emblem; it’s quirky DNA mashup between MPV and hatchback, and the fact that it’s not a Tesla. But, we managed to spend some one-on-one time with the Chevy Bolt and, well, let’s just say that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. Despite the general consensus surrounding GM’s compact EV, and all the hype generated by Tesla, the Bolt has found a place in our hearts. Here’s our story of a simple yet enjoyable getaway with none other than the 2019 Chevy Bolt.

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Best Electric Cars of 2018

Best Electric Cars of 2018

The battery battles are heating up, but who walks away the winner?

Electric vehicles are becoming more and more popular these days, and manufacturers are responding by pouring in the investment and releasing oodles of new models. As such, competition between EV’s is growing, and 2018 was no exception. But the question is, which of these machines is the “best”? To find out, we lined up the usual suspects up and looked at all the critical specs, including range-per-charge, battery capacity, charge times, interior space, interior tech, and more. Read on to see which EV came out on top!

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The Chevy Bolt Is Here for the Long Haul; Won't See a Refresh Until 2025

The Chevy Bolt Is Here for the Long Haul; Won’t See a Refresh Until 2025

Better get used to the one in your driveway…

The Chevrolet Bolt EV is a five-door all-electric hatch bubble released just a few years ago for the 2017 model year. Now, rumor has it GM has a new-gen in the works, but apparently, it won’t see the light of day for at least another seven years.

Continue reading for the full story.

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GM Might Regret Saying it Would Take Blame For Autonomous Car Accidents

GM Might Regret Saying it Would Take Blame For Autonomous Car Accidents

It was a bold statement considering there have been 13 accidents so far this year…

So, GM say’s it’ll take the heat for crashes involving its level 3 autonomous cars. That’s cool and the gang, but it’s quite possible that the brand spoke a little too soon and it could really come back to bite it right in the ass. How so? Well, when you consider that the month of September alone came with a total of six accidents involving GM’s Cruise Automation Division autonomous cars in the great state of California. To add a bit of an ironic twist, Cruise – which is a division of GM – says none of its cars were actually at fault…. Hmmmm what shoulder are they putting that blame on? After all, there have been 13 accidents involving these cars in California this year too… Okay, maybe we’re talking a little too early here to point out those ironies. According to Cruise, most of the incidents involved drivers of other cars (yes, human, and not AI) running into the autonomous cars that could.

It has been reported that in one case, a guy in a Ford Ranger was playing on his phone and rear-ended one of the self-driving cars. In another instance, a Dodge Charger attempted a risky and illegal overtaking procedure when it scraped the front sensor of the car and took off without the driver even looking in the rearview. There was even one case where a Cruise employee saw an accident in the making – a cyclist that was intoxicated and going in the wrong direction – and attempted to stop, but the cyclist smucked into the little Bolt anyway. Gm’s Cruise division says the new generation of Bolt EVs, which provide level 3 autonomy (think of being on point with Tesla AutoPilot,) but, even if they are, are we ready to share the road with artificial intelligence that is apparently more logical than your typical human driver?

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Maven Gig Sounds Cool but Proves People Are Idiots for Using It

Maven Gig Sounds Cool but Proves People Are Idiots for Using It

But hey, you can now rent a Chevy Bolt through the ride-sharing service, so there’s that, which is nice

The concept of ride sharing and the basis for Maven is pretty sweet. Do you live in a big city and need your own whip for a day? Maven’s got you. Are you a college student that needs to take a trip off campus for the day? Well, you’re covered too. It’s not a bad setup. Use an app to choose a car, then use your phone to unlock the car, start the engine, and take your trip – as long as you return the car in the same condition in which you received it, it’s a pretty viable option if you really just need a car for the day. Now, Maven has launched a new program called “Maven Gig.” This program works by allowing you to rent a vehicle for a week at a time, and you can even use it for your side gigs – that means freelance jobs like food delivery services and even Uber. And, it has just added the Chevy Bolt as the initial offering for this program. So, what’s the catch? Well, if you use it more than once in a great while, you’re an idiot.

Seriously, I’m not trying to be rude, but the pricing for a week’s rental for a Chevy Bolt EV comes out to be $229. That’s really not bad if you’re in a jam because your car is broken down or otherwise indisposed of at the moment. But, if it’s something that you use frequently, you’re just spending way too much money. If you do the math, that computes to an average of $992 a month or $11,908 a year. That’s for the use of a car that you can buy, at the time of this writing, for $29,995 after a federal tax credit. In fairness, that weekly rental charge of $229 includes insurance, maintenance, and unlimited miles. We haven’t sat down and computed what it would cost to buy a Bolt EV and insure it at the same time, but something tells us that it’s not going to set you back nearly $1,000 to do so.

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Chevy Bolt Accused of Going Rogue, But the Story is Questionable

Chevy Bolt Accused of Going Rogue, But the Story is Questionable

Did the Bolt EV Smash itself or is is the owner just disgruntled?

With the introduction of autonomous technology, the concept of cars going rogue is a real fear for some. Tesla, for instance, has felt the backlash of a few complaints that its Model S did the unthinkable, only to prove otherwise in most cases. But, this is the first time we’re hearing about the Chevy Bolt EV doing anything out of the ordinary. According to on Bolt EV owner, his Bolt managed to shift itself out of park and smash into a shelving unit behind it, ultimately causing some kind of damage. Apparently, he was out of town (with proof,) and his wife says she didn’t do it. The owner, who goes by socalif on gm-volt.com, posted the story just a few days ago. Here’s what he said:

“Here is a strange one, but seriously happened. I was out of town (the only driver of the Bolt) I get a call saying there was a crash in the garage. BOTH keys were out of the vehicle, car self-locked and shut down in park from the previous night. Wife heard a crash, goes to the garage and sees that the car backed up and ran into a work bench pushing in a wall. Granted, hard to believe, but both keys out of the car, she was in the house (no other drivers here), I was 40 miles away, and somehow the car moved???? Insurance called, dealership notified, GM messaged.”

Other forum members have mixed opinions on the story, with some thinking that it’s possible and others saying it’s a lie. Some hold firm that the wife is at fault. Either way, after messaging GM directly, the owner says they have contacted him and want to set up a time to inspect the vehicle and what happened. Surely, GM will get to the bottom of it, so we’ll get the full story eventually. There is a good reason that some members are skeptical of the story, however, so keep reading to find out.

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EVs Could Put a Big Damper on the Used Car Market

EVs Could Put a Big Damper on the Used Car Market

After a few years, those high-voltage batteries aren’t worth a damn

Have you ever noticed how your cell phone or iPod doesn’t hold a charge quite as long as it used to? The same thing can be said for any rechargeable battery – like the one used to start your gasoline- or diesel-powered vehicle, or even rechargeable batteries used for TV and video game remotes. It’s something nobody really pays attention too, but all rechargeable batteries suffer from capacity degradation over time whether they are regularly charged or not. So what does this have to do with the used car market? Well, as EVs become more popular and start becoming more commonplace, they’ll start to be treated the same way we treat fuel-powered vehicles now: drive them for a few years, then trade it in for something new. But, unlike cars with an internal combustion engine, there will be no such thing as an EV that drives and performs like new after seven or eight years of use.

Just to be clear, I’m not saying all ICE engines will run or perform like new after 100,000 miles and consistent use of a six to eight year period, but it does happen if they are well maintained. Back to the point, the batteries that serve as the lifeblood of EVs, like any other lithium battery, are subject to degradation. Take the Chevy Bolt EV, for instance. Chevy recently published the 2017 owner’s manual for the world to see. Hidden away in the warranty information (page 322) there is a little clause that says:

“Like all batteries, the amount of energy that the high voltage “propulsion” battery can store will decrease with time and miles driven. Depending on use, the battery may degrade as little as 10 percent to as much as 40 percent of capacity over the warranty period. If there are questions pertaining to battery capacity, a dealer service technician could determine if the vehicle is within parameters.”

That means that anyone looking to buy a used Bolt EV in, say, five years won’t likely find one with the full 238 miles of range. In fact, at eight years, Chevy says a loss of up to 40 percent is “acceptable,” which would drop that range down to as little as 142 miles – that’s Nissan Leaf territory. Maybe you’re thinking that you could use that battery degradation as a bargaining point for a lower selling price, then replace the battery. If you are, I like the way you think, but don’t jump on board with that idea just yet. At launch, the secured cost of a lithium-ion battery pack for a Chevy Bolt is $145 per kWh. That comes to a cost of $8,700 for a brand new battery. GM estimates that the price will be down to around $100 per kWh by 2022 when all of these little EVs will be flooding the used market, but even then, it will still cost you an extra $6,000 to replace the battery and get the full 238 miles of charge.

So, what could this really mean for the used car market? Keep reading to find out.

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2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV

2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV

A more powerful and efficient alternative to the Nissan Leaf? You got it!

How do you build the car of the future? Just ask Chevrolet. According to the bowtie, the masses yearn for something that combines connectivity, electrification, and practicality. It has to be upgradeable. It has to be ahead of the status quo. Most importantly, though, it has to be affordable. Enter the 2017 Bolt EV. Offering a plethora of electronic features, 200 miles of range per charge, and a $30,000 price tag, the Bolt appears to tick all the right boxes.

Chevy went to extremes to tie the Bolt to the cutting edge of technology, streaming the debut at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show via Facebook Live and following it up with an interactive 3D tour of the interior. I wouldn’t have been surprised if there was a hologram of Steve Jobs in a Tron outfit at the end of it. Dead gadget tycoons aside, the 2017 Bolt looks to be a real watershed moment, not just for Chevy, but EVs as a whole. But is it?

Continue reading to learn more about the 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV.

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Chevy Bolt Puts Nissan Leaf to Shame; Comes with 238-Mile Range

Chevy Bolt Puts Nissan Leaf to Shame; Comes with 238-Mile Range

The best affordable EV out there at least until Tesla launches the Model 3

In early 2015, Chevrolet unveiled the Bolt EV Concept and promised it would become the first affordable electric car with more than 200 miles of range. Less than two years have passed since then and its seems that GM will keep its promise and deliver a production Bolt with an EPA-estimated range of 238 miles. That’s a whopping 131 miles more than the Nissan Leaf, a popular offering on the EV market, and the best mileage you’ll be able to get on an affordable car for the 2017 model year.

Speaking of pricing, Chevy says the Bolt is expected to cost less than $37,500. That’s before the available federal tax credit of $7,500, meaning some buyers will be able to take one home for less than $30,000. That’s significantly more expensive than the Volt and Spark EV, which can be had for as low as $25,750 and $18,495, respectively, but neither can provide the Bolt’s 200-mile range. While the Volt can travel for only 53 miles on electricity alone, the Spark EV is rated at 82 miles. The only EV that can deliver something similar is the Tesla Model S, but the base model, which is rated at 210 miles, starts from $66,000 before incentives.

This makes the Bolt quite an attractive package, at least until Tesla begins production of the Model 3 in late 2017.

As for Chevy’s electric hatchback, it will arrive in showroom in late 2016. However, the Bolt will be sold in select dealerships only, meaning you might not be able to buy it at the nearest Chevrolet showroom. Stay tuned for more info as the Bolt makes its way onto the production line.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Affordable EV Showdown – Tesla Model 3 vs. Chevrolet Bolt

Affordable EV Showdown – Tesla Model 3 vs. Chevrolet Bolt

Two hotly anticipated all-electrics battle for your bucks

Across the globe, all-electric car sales are on the rise. Automakers are pouring money into development and laying the groundwork for a future where battery-driven automobiles rule the market, and while internal combustion is still number one when it comes to industry success, the battle for EV supremacy is starting to heat up. The new frontline can be found in the pockets of consumers looking for relatively affordable electrified conveyance, and two major players are gearing up for an all-out assault – the Tesla Model 3 and Chevrolet Bolt EV. Both offer impressive distance-per-charge at a reasonable price point. But the question is this – which one is better?

For now, details on the yet-to-be-released Model 3 are still in flux, but given what we know so far, these two titans of the EV world should stack up nicely for a head-to-head showdown.

For this comparison, we’ll take a look at a variety of vehicle characteristics, including gadgets and technology, performance and range, cargo space and practicality, style and aesthetics, and comfort and interior, plus we’ll give you a few alternatives if neither car is what you’re looking for.

Continue reading for the full comparison.

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Ford Reportedly Considers Chevrolet Bolt Competitor

Ford Reportedly Considers Chevrolet Bolt Competitor

At the 2015 Detroit Auto Show, Chevrolet revealed the Bolt EV Concept as a "vision for an affordable, long-range all-electric vehicle" that could offer more than 200 miles of range. Chevy claimed that the compact, which showcased a number of high-tech features, could cost from around $30,000 if put into production. Now, Ford is reportedly working on a similar product, with a concept car rumored to break cover at the 2015 Los Angeles Auto Show.
That’s the word from AutoGuide, which claims Ford’s answer to the Bolt would be a brand-new, dedicated model and not just an electric vehicle based on a product that already exists in the brand’s current lineup. The source goes on to add that it will offer a similar range to the Bolt, but, other than that, there are no details. With the Chevrolet Bolt likely to arrive in dealerships in 2017, AutoGuide’s report doesn’t seem far-fetched, but, until there is some sort of official confirmation from the Blue Oval, I’m taking this information with a grain of salt.

Continue reading to learn more about Ford’s competitor for the Chevrolet Bolt.

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Chevrolet Bolt EV Will Be Put Into Production In 2016

Chevrolet Bolt EV Will Be Put Into Production In 2016

Amidst all of the performance cars that debuted at the Detroit Auto Show, Chevrolet was also bolstering its green-car cred with the redesigned 2016 Chevrolet Volt and the 2015 Chevrolet Bolt Concept. The new Volt will go on sale later this year, but there was no word as to what plans Chevy had in store for the diminutive all-electric concept. It now seems that Reuters has dug up some potentially interesting details about the car’s future.

According to information obtained by two suppliers, the report says that the Bolt will go into production in October 2016 for the 2017 model year, and it will be built at GM’s Orion assembly plant, where Chevy hopes to produce between 25,000 to 30,000 units per year. This “underused small-car plant north of Detroit” currently builds the compact Buick Verano and the subcompact Chevrolet Sonic, and the addition of the Bolt will help improve the production capacity, which has fallen off as the demand for small cars plummeted along with gas prices. From the report, the Bolt will ride on the Gamma II platform shared with the Sonic, Buick Encore and Chevy Trax.

Perhaps equally big news, GM might also have plans to introduce an Opel version of the Bolt for European sales in a similar move to what it did for the Chevy Volt and Opel Ampera.

Click past the jump to read more about the Chevrolet Bolt EV.

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2015 Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

2015 Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

General Motors appears to be interested in adding to its green car lineup with a new compact crossover called the Bolt EV. While still just a concept, the Bolt would slot in neatly alongside the new 2016 Volt and Spark EV, both of which are already humming their way up and down public roads. The Bolt is designed as a way forward in Chevy’s ambition to provide an affordable, long-range, all-electric vehicle, with a roughly $30,000 starting price and more than 200 miles stated as objectives for the first two adjectives of that description, respectively.

“Chevrolet believes electrification is a pillar of future transportation and needs to be affordable for a wider segment of customers,” said General Motors CEO Mary Barra in a press release. Price and range are two of the most important factors when it comes to widespread EV adoption, so GM clearly has the right idea going for them.

At first glance, the Bolt appears well rounded, both physically and metaphorically. The exterior body looks optimized to reduce drag, while the interior is pleasantly equipped and laid out. It’s a design that’s somewhat reminiscent of the BMW i3, albeit with a dollop of futuristic, concept-ish gloss smeared across it.

If GM wants to be a leader in the world of electrics and hybrids, this would certainly be a step in the right direction. Chevy has yet to confirm any intentions to put the Bolt into production, but rumors are circulating that it could go on sale in the U.S. and limited overseas markets in 2017.

In the meantime, we’ll just have to pick apart the new Volt hybrid for some domestic green car goodness. Maybe we’ll even see yet another foray into the world of EVs from GM. Here’s our pitch: an electric bus for new-age hippies. We’ll call it the Ohm.

Updated 01/23/2015: We’ve added a series of new images from the car’s official debut at the 2015 Detroit Auto Show. Check the new images in the "Pictures" tab.

Click past the jump to read more about the Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept.

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