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1957 Chevrolet Model 150 Squad Car Stole The Show In Chicago

1957 Chevrolet Model 150 Squad Car Stole The Show In Chicago

1957 Chevrolet Model 150 Paid Homage To CPD

Ok, every time I see a Chevy of this stature from the Fifties, I imagine a massive engine under the bonnet with some insane supercharger, an exhaust sticking out of the fenders or under the side skirts, and a lot of fiery decals. Yup, I am thinking about gassers which are basically a natural opposite to the car we have here - the 1957 Chevrolet Model 150 Squad car from the Chicago Police department. It was proudly exhibited at the 2019 Chicago Auto Show, and it is not its first time to sit under the Chicago Auto Show lights. I found out that it was there in 2017 too. Probably before as well, but I cannot claim perfect knowledge. What I can tell you instead, is the fact that this particular 1957 Chevy Squad car is privately owned by Patrick Tode. He tried to maintain it to the best of his ability for 25 years. Considering it’s a part of an auto show nowadays, it is obviously in great condition.

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1927 Chevy Coupe Found inside Manasoo Shipwreck in Lake Huron

1927 Chevy Coupe Found inside Manasoo Shipwreck in Lake Huron

Bringing the treasure trove back to the surface could cost a fortune

The Manasoo, a ship that sank back in 1928, was finally found this June and it revealed something unexpected: a 1927 Chevrolet Coupe inside the steamer’s hull. While it’s one of the thousands of shipwrecks lying at the bottom of the Great Lakes, it’s surely one of the few to feature a car onboard.

The nearly-intact wreckage of the ship was found this summer below Lake Huron in Canada and, beyond the unexpectedly good condition of the vessel itself, it also nestled a vintage car that survived through the disaster and was found practically undamaged.

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1967 Chevrolet Chevelle SS

1967 Chevrolet Chevelle SS

The first-gen Chevelle at the peak of its refinement

The 1967 Chevrolet Chevelle was the windup of the first generation of this American classic. It came with a facelift compared to 1966 and, just like before, numerous body styles were available as well as a wide palette of trim levels to appeal to every GM buyer. This one, a 2-door SS, was the boldest of all Chevelles.

It was back in 1964 that Chevrolet introduced the Chevelle as a mid-size as a direct response to Ford’s Fairlane and AMC’s Classic models that were at the top of their game in the intermediate class. The production-ready Chevelle wasn’t conceived as a unibody model. Instead, GM decided to put the only new American car of 1964 on the A-body platform which was quite a novelty at the time.

By 1967, the Chevelle was reaching the end of the first generation’s production run and, before a new car was introduced for 1968, the restyled first-generation model soldiered on and, by now, the Super Sport (SS) model was standalone. Meanwhile, the Malibu remained the top trim level option for the Chevelle and actually went on to replace the Chevelle nameplate altogether 11 years later.

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1970 Chevrolet El Camino SS

1970 Chevrolet El Camino SS

Everyone’s favorite car-turned-truck

The Chevrolet El Camino coupe utility vehicle was classified as an SUV at the time. It was based on the chassis of a sedan but offered a sizeable bed behind the seats. The third generation El Camino was the second to last to be based on the Chevelle platform.

The El Camino was GM’s answer to the Ford Ranchero. Apparently, GM’s Harley Earl had thought about introducing a coupe utility vehicle a full five years before Ford debuted the Ranchero but internal decision-making delayed the concept which was only green-lighted after GM noticed that the Ranchero had a market.

The El Camino became, arguably, the most practical muscle car by 1970 as a response to the Ranchero which was, by now, based on the Ford Falcon. That’s why you could get an El Camino with the Super Sport package and an almighty engine under the hood. This particular example comes with the 7.0-liter 550 horsepower V-8 engine which wasn’t available on the El Camino at the time.

Keep reading to learn more about the 1970 Chevrolet El Camino SS

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1961 Chevrolet Impala

1961 Chevrolet Impala

The first step forward for the Impala

The Chevrolet Impala was rejuvenated again for 1961, officially the year when the third generation rolled into production. Chevy’s flagship full-size model was now entirely modern and, more importantly, an SS version became available.

The Impala debuted in 1958 as the top trim level for the Bel Air known as the Bel Air Impala. 1958 was the year of GM’s 50th anniversary, and the Bel Air Impala was the anniversary Chevrolet model. It featured different styling compared to lesser Bel Airs and people bought into it. So much so that, only one year later, the Impala became a model of its own - which is now considered the second generation Impala.

The 1961 Impala was still based on the B-body platform and sat on an X-frame chassis without side rails that were said to improve rigidity and lower the center of gravity. It had already been in use for two years on the previous Impala iteration. The new car came as a Hardtop 2-door Coupe, a Convertible, a 2-door Sedan, a 4-door Sedan, and a 4-door Station Wagon.

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1320 Video Features Brutal Diesel Truck Dragster: Video

1320 Video Features Brutal Diesel Truck Dragster: Video

A diesel that will knock your socks off, guaranteed!

Now, let’s all take a short break from being eco-conscious and just enjoy the sight of this ludicrous 1937 Chevrolet pick-up truck which is one of the fastest diesel-powered trucks in the world. And yes, it has 3,000 pound-feet of torque.

If you drive a Honda Civic or a Chevrolet Volt you’re surely not going to enjoy the huge puffs of black, coal-like, smoke coming from this old school pick up known as ’The Outcast.’ Built by Tony Rizzi, this thing has upwards of 2,300-horsepower, and it revs all the way to 7,500 rpm. A diesel that revs to 7,500 rpm. Let that sink in.

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Budget Direct Renders the Evolution of 7 Timeless Models

Budget Direct Renders the Evolution of 7 Timeless Models

Don’t expect any of these models to go away anytime soon

There is no shortage of car models in the auto industry these days. Some models have gained followings while others have become flashes in the pan. Then there are the titans of the business, the models that have lasted the test of time and have been around, literally, for generations. In the course of their respective lifetimes, these models have evolved in more ways than one, none more evident than their designs. These seven models have been around for so long their designs have evolved considerably from when they first came out. Knowing their place in the business, these models are unlikely to go away anytime soon.

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Video of the Day: Wrecks to Riches - "The Green Car"

Video of the Day: Wrecks to Riches - "The Green Car"

In light of St. Patricks Day, we figure there’s no better way to celebrate than to watch this episode about "The Green Car." So, grab yourself some green beer, and kick back for the next hour.

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10 Rear-Engined Cars That Aren't A Porsche 911

10 Rear-Engined Cars That Aren’t A Porsche 911

A quick look at today’s automotive offerings and you’ll notice that almost all passenger cars are front-engined, while most sports cars come with a mid-engined configuration. The Porsche 911 is the most known exception from this rule, having its engine mounted above the rear axle. The 911 isn’t the only rear-engined car on the market, the Smart ForTwo and ForFour, Renault Twingo, Tesla Model S, and Tata Nano have similar configurations, but all of them are part of the minority. However, it wasn’t always like this.

Decades ago, rear-engined vehicles were significantly more popular. The first notable rear-engined car dates back to 1886, when Karl Benz launched the Patent-Motorwagen. The concept gained more traction in the 1930 and remained somewhat popular until the 1980s. Mostly found in small, affordable cars, the layout allowed for the rest of the vehicle to be used for passengers and luggage. It was also preferred by many carmakers since the drivetrain can installed easily at the factory compared to front-wheel-drive layout where the driven wheels also steer the car.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Ebay Find of the Day: 1962 Chevy C10 Patina Pro Touring Restomod

Ebay Find of the Day: 1962 Chevy C10 Patina Pro Touring Restomod

One hot truck for the street or strip

Restomodding has become extremely popular these last few years, with guys restoring old cars while giving them new life with modern parts. It’s like a Goldilocks special – the best of both worlds wrapped into a single project. A perfect example is this 1962 Chevrolet C10 pickup that’s been completely reworked from bumper to bumper. Now it’s our eBay find of the day.

The truck has been fully restored, complete with a painted ladder frame, custom cargo bed with tubbed wheel wells, and an awesome flat flame red paint job. Black accents help define the C10’s bodylines while breaking up the monotony of the slab sides. Inside, the red color scheme continues with red carpet, a red dash, and red seats. Black accents on the steering wheel, gear shifter, gauge cluster, and seats help pull off the two-tone theme.

Power comes from a 355 cubic-inch small-block Chevy with a Rowdy Thumpr cam from Comp Cams. It’s kept cool with an aluminum radiator and an electronic fan. The engine is decked out with chrome valve covers and a matching air cleaner sitting atop the four-barrel carburetor. The V-8 is mated to an automatic an automatic transmission with a floor shifter. Power, of course, is sent rearward to the fat rear tires. Though the gearing isn’t specifically stated, the listing says the rear end is geared for the highway – likely making this a great cruiser.

The truck rides on a bagged suspension, making the ride height adjustable for the show and for the road. A set of 20-inch, five-spoke wheels ride up front with 22-inchers out back. They come wrapped in high performance rubber. Performance disc brakes up front and new drum brakes out back pull the truck to a stop.

There’s more to this truck, so keep reading for the full details.

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1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible

1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible

One of the best Chevy Classics that money can buy

The Chevy Bel Air was pretty much an instant classic when it hit showrooms back in 1950. The first generation, which ran between 1950 and 1954) sported a revolutionary design, with hardtop models designed as a convertible with a non-removable hard top. It was a design that had been around since the early 1920s, but up until the Bel Air, as well as other models from Chevy and Cadillac, the design hadn’t really seen too much success. The model we’re here to talk about today is a 1957 Bel Air convertible that will be going under the hammer in August of 2016 at the Mecum auction during Monterey Car Week.

This specific model isn’t exactly your everyday ’57 Chevy, though. This thing has gone through restoration, is completely rust free, and has been upgraded with a 5.7-liter Corvette-derived LS1 that is backed by the near bullet-proof 4L60-E four-speed automatic (the modern version of the 700R4 transmission.) Outside of this, there are lots of other goodies and features that make this Bel Air convertible a true one-of-a-kind model. So, let’s get on with my review before I make this introduction just way too long.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible.

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1956 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup

1956 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup

The classic 1950s look embodied in a pickup

The 1950s were a special time for American automobiles. Chrome, big fenders, narrow wheels, and futuristic comfort features were all the rage. Chevrolet was perhaps the most pervasive brand of the era thanks to big hits like the 1956 Bel Air. This popular trend extended even into Chevy’s pickup lineup. Introduced in 1955, the Chevrolet Task Force pickups featured all the right stuff, plus offered a heavier duty chassis than the Advance Design pickup series it replaced.

The Chevy Task Force came with a striking new design that mirrored Chevy’s passenger car designs. The Task Force series also bought never-before-seen comforts to the pickup segment, including a wraparound windshield, wraparound rear glass on Deluxe Cab models, a larger interior, power steering, power brakes, a 12-volt electrical system, and an optional automatic transmission. What’s more, 1955 was the first year for Chevy’s legendary small-block V-8. Displacing 265 cubic inches, this 4.3-liter V-8 was the first V-8 in a Chevy pickup.

The Task Force series of pickups lasted from 1955 through 1959 when the Apache series, took over. The Apache also started carrying the C/K series designation, which denoted either RWD (C) or 4WD (K), and would soon take over as Chevy’s pickup truck names until 1999 when the Silverado trim line officially became the model name.

But it was 1956 when Chevrolet built the truck you see here. This 3100 model foregoes the V-8 in favor of Chevy’s then-popular 235 Thriftmaster inline six-cylinder and four-speed manual transmission. It does sport the Deluxe Cab with the rounded rear glass, two-tone paint, and the optional heater package. Mecum auctions will roll this meticulously restored truck across the auction block during the 2016 Monterey auction taking place August 18th through 20th.

There’s plenty more information about this truck below the jump, so keep reading for more.

Continue reading for our full review on the Chevrolet 3100 Pickup.

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