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2021 Toyota Supra A91 Edition

2021 Toyota Supra A91 Edition

The A91 Edition is limited to just 1,000 examples and features some nice exclusive touches

Toyota made some major changes to the 2021 Toyota Supra, the most important of which come in the form of updated power output for the six-cylinder model and the introduction of the four-cylinder Supra to the U.S. market. However, there was another gem hidden in Toyota’s announcement, and that is the Supra A91 Special Edition. It doesn’t come with any extra power over the standard model, but it is based on the six-cylinder model, so it does have the extra power.

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2020 SSC Tuatara

2020 SSC Tuatara

After more than a decade of development, the Tuatara finally goes into production

The 2020 SSC Tuatara is the production version of a supercar that SSC North American has been developing since the late 2000s. Previewed by a concept car in 2011 and a pre-production model in 2018, the 2020 Tuatara is finally ready to go into production in 2020.

Aimed at supercars like the Bugatti Chiron, Koenigsegg Jesko, and the Hennessey Venom F5, the 2020 Tuatara features a V-8 engine that generates up to 1,750 horsepower and promises to hit a top speed in excess of 300 mph. The supercar costs more than $2 million and is limited to only 100 units. Let’s find out more about it in the review below.

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2020 Aston Martin DBS ‘59' and Vantage ‘59'

2020 Aston Martin DBS ‘59’ and Vantage ‘59’

Ultra rare Astons celebrate automaker’s iconic 1959 Le Mans victory

Aston Martin is rolling out a pair of special edition models to celebrate the automaker’s historic one-two finish at the 1959 24 Hours of Le Mans. Appropriately dubbed the “59 Edition” models, 24 units of the DBS Superleggera and 59 units of the Vantage AMR have been given the special edition treatment.

Both models take their exclusive styling cues from the race-winning DBR1 racer, which roared to victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans back in 1959, beating powerhouse teams from Ferrari and Porsche on its way to victory.

The super rare Astons were commissioned by the automaker’s dealership in Gloucestershire, England. The cost of owning the DBS Superleggera 59 comes up to £325,000 — that converts to around $420,000 — while the Vantage AMR 59 is priced at $209,995. Sadly, all 24 units of the DBS Superleggera 59 are already accounted for, though there might still be available units of the Vantage AMR 59.

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2020 Lotus Elise Cup 250 Bathurst Edition

2020 Lotus Elise Cup 250 Bathurst Edition

Special edition Elise is forbidden fruit for all of us in America

Lotus is paying homage to Australia’s most famous race by launching the Elise Cup 250 Bathurst Edition. Limited to just six units — yes, six — the Elise Cup 250 Bathurst Edition is as exclusive as it’s going to get. The special edition sports car boasts exclusive features befitting its status, none more prominent than a rare paint finish that hasn’t been used in a Lotus since the Lotus Esprit that starred in the James Bond movie The Spy Who Loved Me.

In addition to the exclusive paint, the Elise 250 Bathurst Edition also comes with interior upgrades and mechanical improvements. The sports car’s 1.8-liter supercharged four-cylinder engine, on the other hand, remains in stock form. The cost of owning one of the six Lotus Elise 250 Bathurst Edition models sits at AUD109,900.

That converts to around $73,760 based on current exchange rates. Unfortunately for us here in the U.S., all six units of the Elise 250 Bathurst Edition are exclusive to the Australian market.

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2008 Lamborghini Reventón

2008 Lamborghini Reventón

One of the rarest and most expensive Lambos of the noughties

The Lamborghini Reventon isn’t just a styling exercise that sits on the chassis and drivetrain of the Murcielago LP60. It’s the pole bearer for a new direction in Lamborghini design, a direction whose cues can be seen in future Lamborghini models such as the restyled Gallardo or the Aventador. The source of inspiration? Fighter jets.

Marcello Gandini all but dictated that all V-12 Lamborghinis have to be brash and dramatic with razor-sharp edges, clean surfaces, and aggressive angles all around. The Italian manufacturer didn’t have a visual identity before the year 1974 so they went with it, seeing how well the wedge-shaped mid-engined supercar faired. Then came the Diablo, then the Murcielago, all of which following the same path. However, with each new car, Lamborghini refined the edges, added a few curves here and there, made things softer.

The Reventon looked like a return to the roots. It looked like an F117A Blackhawk with that bespoke grayish green color covering all of the pointy surfaces and, for all the work Lamborghini put into the car’s exterior, you can forgive them for leaving the underpinnings taken straight from the Murcielago LP640 untouched. Just 20 examples were made a decade ago - yes, it’s that old! - and then Lamborghini set to work again cutting the roof off the car to create a Roadster version. Some thought it’s a bit weird while others love it. The going rate for one of these suggests there’s not much interest in them now they’ll still turn heads anywhere they go.

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2020 Ford GT Liquid Carbon Edition

2020 Ford GT Liquid Carbon Edition

The 2020 Ford GT receives more oomph and visual flair

Big news from FoMoCo on its supercar. It’s still powered by the same 3.5-liter twin-turbocharged EcoBoost V-6, but for the 2020 model year, power goes up from 647 horsepower to 660 horsepower. Torque stays unchanged (550 pound-feet), but it’s now available within a broader band.

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2021 BMW M4 Coupe

2021 BMW M4 Coupe

Mere days after we saw a prototype version of the all-new BMW M4 prancing around in test mule form comes its hardtop sibling, which, not surprisingly, is also decked in full camo regalia. To be fair, this isn’t the first time that the BMW M4 Coupe was spotted in the wild.

Back in December, we caught a glimpse of the sports coupé being unloaded from a car transporter. That sighting didn’t amount to much, but this fresh batch of spy photos shows the M4 Coupe — still wrapped in heavy camouflage — in its more natural state, engaged in test runs in and around the streets of Germany.

Just like its roofless sibling, the all-new BMW M4 Coupe is set to debut sometime this summer ahead of its market launch at the end of the year. But before any of that happens, BMW will continue doing test runs of the M4, hopefully with fewer camo wraps in the succeeding sessions.

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2020 Felino CB7R

2020 Felino CB7R

Canadian supercar manufacturer Felino has just announced a new sports car that goes by the name CB7R – a road-going version of the CB7 race car that was forgotten about just as fast as it was announced. The car is offered with a pair of engines. The standard engine is a 6.2-liter V-8 that delivers 525 horsepower and 486 pound-feet of torque, the latter of which becomes fully available at 5,200 rpm. This engine revs as high as 6,600 rpm and is able to keep the CB7R at a power-to-weight ratio of 2kg per horsepower. This model can reach 62 mph in 2.9 seconds and tops out at 201.94 mph.

The other engine in question is a naturally aspirated 7.0-liter V-8 that is good for 700 horsepower at 6,700 rpm and 580 pound-feet at 5,600 rpm. This engine maxes out at 7,250 rpm and contributes to a tidy power-to-weight ratio of 1.6kg per horsepower. Oddly enough, when equipped with this engine, the CB7R makes the same 2.9-second sprint to 62 mph, however top speed on this model is limited to 214.37 mph.

With a front-mid engine configuration, the CB7R is able to remain nimble with a 50-50 weight distribution. It’s a good thing, considering Felino says that the CB7R is “targeting an experienced clientele of sports driving enthusiasts” and has a goal of competing with “major international manufacturers in the high-end supercars segment.”

We’re not sure about you, but those certainly sound like fighting words. Will the CB7R actually become a mainstay on the market, or will it disappear as quickly as the CB7 that it’s based on? Only time will tell. For now, you can check out our gallery of the CB7R in the slider above or a little further down the page.

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2020 Alpine A110 SportsX

2020 Alpine A110 SportsX

An Alpine A110 that can go off-road? Well, maybe just a little

Alpine has decided to partake in a fun design exercise that blends the the modern-day Alpine A110 with inspiration derived from the A110 SportsX that won the Monte Carlo Rally in 1973. . The idea is to showcase the potential for customization offered by the current A110, and showcase that it does. Alpine started by making the A110 80 mm wider and followed up by raising the suspension by 60 mm to make it more off-road friendly.

As far as we can tell, the modern-day Alpine A110 SportsX is powered by the same engine as the standard A100, which means there’s a 1.8-liter four-cylinder in place to do the dirty work. Power output should be pegged at 252 horsepower and 236 pound-feet of torque. This design study, if it was slated for production wouldn’t be quite so fast to 60 mph (4.5 seconds) but it would be more of a go-anywhere type of vehicle so it might be a fair trade-off.

We’ve organized a nice gallery of the Alpine A110 SportsX in the slider above and the page below. Go ahead and browse through and let us know what you think.

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1993 Lamborghini Diablo SE 30

1993 Lamborghini Diablo SE 30

Lamborghini’s way of celebrating its 30th anniversary

The Lamborghini Diablo SE 30, where SE stands for Special Edition, was built between 1993 and 1995 to celebrate the 30th anniversary since the Lamborghini company was founded by Ferruccio Lamborghini. Only 150 of these special Diablos were built and less than 30 received the coveted Jota package.

Lamborghini’s only supercar built during the Chrysler ownership years was the Diablo, a model that was conceived to be better in all areas than the Countach which had originally been presented all the way back in 1974. The Diablo featured a rounder design although it was still a wedge shape car in spirit with the same scissor doors that powered the Countach to every child’s bedroom wall in the ’70s and ’80s.

As mighty as the Diablo was, Lamborghini turned the dial to 11 with the SE 30. Designed as an even more purposeful version, it was over 250 pounds lighter than the standard model and hid almost 40 extra ponies under the engine lid. But Lamborghini’s desire to go GT racing in the then-sprawling BPR GT Endurance Series saw them build a number of Jota kits designed to be added to the SE 30. The original purpose of the Jota trans-kit was to transform the Diablo into a turn-key race car, but the majority of the 28 kits built ended up on street-legal cars after all.

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2020 Lotus Evora GT410 “Phil's Spec”

2020 Lotus Evora GT410 “Phil’s Spec”

A more friendly road-going Evora based on the U.S.-Spec Evora

Believe it or not, the U.S.-Spec Lotus Evora is a little more down to Earth and quieter on the road. Once Lotus boss Phil Popham got behind the wheel of one, he decided Europe needed something a little more daily driver friendly too; that’s how the Lotus Evora GT410 came to be. It sits right alongside the Evora GT 410 Sport, but with being a little more road-focused, it has an entirely different attitude. Here’s what makes it different.

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2020 Ultima RS

2020 Ultima RS

The ultimate Ultima

Ultima has been making ludicrously fast track-focused supercars for over two decades but this latest one called the RS is the one for the ages. With as much as 1,200 horsepower from a supercharged Chevy-sourced LT5 V-8 and a dry weight of little over 2,000 pounds, the Ultima RS channels everything that was great about Group C prototypes in a package that you can take down to the shops.

The British are famous for building some of their best cars in sheds. Take Morgan, for instance. Or the Lotus 7-inspired Caterham. Ultima is yet another worthy example and, just like Caterham, you can assemble your Ultima in your very own garage if you so desire, all for the price of a "mundane BMW M3," according to the company. Not bad for something that would thrash just about anything at your local track day, right?

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2020 Nissan GT-R Nismo - Driven

2020 Nissan GT-R Nismo - Driven

Godzilla is a fitting name, but you’ll never understand why until you get behind the wheel

The R35 Nissan GT-R has been on the market since 2009, so it’s getting pretty long in the tooth. Be that as it may, car enthusiasts everywhere paint it as one of the world’s best cars. It is, quite literally, one of the fastest point-to-point cars on the planet, something it can lay claim to thanks to its precisely tuned chassis, sophisticated AWD system, a monstrous twin-turbo V-6, and race-proven roots that cannot be denied. But, being more than a decade old, makes paying six figures a tough pill to swallow, so it begs the question, is the Nissan GT-R actually worth buying? Is it still one of the best-driving cars in the world, and does its performance hold a candle to the new sports cars on the market?

We set out to find answers to those questions and more, and Nissan was kind enough to lend us a 2020 Nissan GT-R Nismo for an entire week to do with as we please. Needless to say, it’s been a very fun week and, despite the GT-R’s age, Nissan has done a fairly decent job of keeping things somewhat fresh and interesting. This is our story with the Nissan GT-R Nismo.

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2020 Laffite G-Tec X-Road

2020 Laffite G-Tec X-Road

Forget about the Urus drifting on sand, this is a supercar designed to love mud

Remember the Zarooq Sand Racer? You don’t? Well, that’s no biggie, because it died at some point a couple of years ago, but now it’s back under a different name, with a polished attitude.

The Zarooq Sand Racer was supposed to open a new niche, that of off-road supercars. It packed a V-6 good for 300 horsepower and looked like a hybrid between a Dakar rally car and an exotic, but was rather short-lived. This is where the Laffite G-Tec X-Road comes to pick up where the Sand Racer left off.

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2021 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 4.0

2021 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 4.0

The naturally aspirated flat-six makes a comeback!

The 2021 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 is a naturally aspirated version of the existing 718 Cayman. An update of the current 718 Cayman GTS, the GTS 4.0 ditches the turbocharged, 2.5-liter flat-four engine in favor of a 4.0-liter flat-six mill. The engine is shared with the range-topping 2020 718 Cayman GT4, but detuned in order to slot the GTS 4.0 a bit lower in the lineup.

The 2021 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 was unveiled alongside an identical version of the 718 Boxster. The 2021 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 is expected to hit dealerships for the 2021 model year. Let’s find out more about it in the review below.

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2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8.R

2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8.R

The latest evolution of the race-going breed

Corvette Racing, the oldest continuous program in top-level sports car racing of the modern era, unveiled its next chapter back in October when GM unexpectedly took the wraps off the C8.R, the GTE-spec race car based on the eighth-generation Corvette. It comes with a menacing body kit, a huge wing hanging over the back, and a flat-plane crank, 500 horsepower, 5.5-liter V-8 in the middle. A pair will race in the IMSA Weathertech SportsCar Championship and at Le Mans next year, so keep your eyes and ears peeled.

It was back in 1999 at the Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona that a factory-backed racing Corvette first took to the track in an official practice session for a race. After decades of racing in privateer hands, barring some semi-factory-backed efforts that were ultimately canned due to GM’s ban on motorsport-related activities, the Corvette finally competed with backing from Detroit. 21 years later, Corvette Racing is still taking on the world’s best on America’s road courses and beyond and its latest weapon is unarguably the craziest yet.

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