Powered by the most powerful crate engine yet!

The Dodge Super Charger is a concept car that marks the 50th anniversary of the second-generation Charger, produced for the 1968 to 1970 model years. Unveiled at the 2018 SEMA Show, the Super Charger is a restomod that combines the design of the original Dodge Charger with modern parts from Mopar and the Challenger SRT Hellcat and Demon. More importantly, it showcases a new Hemi V-8 engine that cranks out an incredible 1,000 horsepower.

The big news here is that the 7.0-liter mill is a crate engine that you’ll be able to buy from FCA starting in 2019. The Super Charger was created specifically for the massive mill, which was dubbed Hellephant as a tribute to the original Mopar 426 Hemi engine, nicknamed Elephant due to its size and power. Obviously, Hellephant combined both the classic Elephant and the modern Hellcat monikers. The Hellephant is also the first 1,000-horsepower crate engine offered by an OEM carmaker.

Continue reading to learn more about the Dodge Super Charger concept.

2018 Dodge Super Charger Concept Exterior

  • Based on 1968 Charger
  • Hellcat headlamps
  • Fiberglass bumpers
  • Demon splitter
  • Demon hood scoop
  • Modern wheels
  • 1971 Duster mirrors
  • "Hellephant" logos
  • Exhaust pipes integrated into the taillights
  • Custom grey paint
2018 Dodge Super Charger Concept Exterior
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The Super Charger may be based on the original Charger, but Dodge made significant modifications to the body. Up front, the muscle car retains the original grille that stretches across the entire width of the fascia, but the pop-up headlamps behind them were replaced with Challenger SRT Hellcat lights.

The standard bumpers were also replaced with fiberglass units that were flushed up and shortened for a more modern design. Below there a custom fiberglass splitter that looks a lot like the one from the Challenger SRT Demon. There also a new fiberglass hood with inner-steel construction carried from the original Charger.

The big highlight here though is the massive hood scoop modeled on that of the Challenger SRT Demon.

Moving onto the sides, it’s the wider fenders with fiberglass flares that catch the eye. Dodge also shaved off the door handles for a cleaner look and replaced the Chager’s original mirrors with sportier units from the 1971 Duster. The front door vent windows, a traditional feature on 1960s muscle cars, was removed and replaced with one-piece side glass.

2018 Dodge Super Charger Concept Exterior
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No restomod is complete without modern wheels. The Super Charger features a set of custom-made, five-twin spoke rims finished in a smoked gold color. The design is based off the Challenger SRT Hellcat. While the front wheels measure 20 inches, the rear rollers are slightly bigger at 21 inches. Naturally, they’re wider than the Charger’s standard wheels in order to provide the grip needed to put 1,000 horsepower on the pavement.

The profile is rounded off by "426 Mopar" decals on the fenders and a Satin Black fuel cap with a custom-milled, aluminum "Hellephant" medallion.

The image shows an evil-looking elephant head on a blue background.

The rear fascia was updated to include a custom fiberglass bumper similar to the one seen up front, but Dodge also added a custom spoiler inspired by the modern Charger R/T. But arguably the coolest feature is the exhaust integrated into the taillights.

2018 Dodge Super Charger Concept Exterior
- image 802795
The lower exhaust tips were eliminated altogether and replaced five-inch, dual-walled outlets from the Alfa Romeo Stelvio.

They were also re-engineered to run through the taillamp housing, while the brake lights have been reconfigured with LED lights that glow around the exhaust tips. When turned on, it looks as if the exhaust pipes have red flames glaring around them. Now that’s unique and really, really cool!

Finally, Dodge wrapped the coupe in a custom De Grigio Grey Metallic paint and kept the Charger’s iconic stripes on the rear fenders and trunk lid. FCA also dropped the Super Charger by 3.5 inches up front and 2.5 inches to the rear for a more aggressive stance.

2018 Dodge Super Charger Concept Interior

  • 1968 dashboard
  • Modern Mopar gauges
  • Viper steering
  • Viper seats
  • Hellcat gear shifter
  • Racing harnesses
  • Rollcage
  • Rear-seat delete
  • Hellcat and Mopar floor mats
2018 Dodge Super Charger Concept Interior
- image 802797

The interior of the Super Charger is also a combination of classic Charger features and new elements from the modern FCA portofolio.

Dodge retained the squared-off dashboard of the 1968 Charger, but combined it with new Mopar gauges.

But while these are modern and feature a blue background color, they’re also traditional analog gauges. No digital screens in this restomod, which adds to the vintage vibe.

The steering wheel looks decidedly more modern than the Charger’s, but that’s not surprising given that Dodge took it from the recently discontinued Viper. Highlighted by red stitching and a thick red stripe at the 12 o’clock position, it also features the Hellephant medallion in the center. The upper part of the passenger-side dash features a De Grigio Grey Metallic insert that matches the body color and the "Super Charger" lettering at the right corner.

The center console also remains true to the original 1968 Charger, but it now features a manual shifter taken from the Challenger SRT Hellcat, as well as an engine start button.

Sporty Viper seats wrapped in Alcantara with red stitching and fitted with four-point Sabelt racing harnesses flank the console.

There are no rear seats, a feature reminiscent of the Challenger SRT Demon, which leaves room for a two-inch rollcage and a net for storage of racing equipment such as helmets and gloves.

The floor is covered with Challenger SRT Hellcat carpets in the back and custom mats based on the Charger SRT in the front. A Mopar pedal kit and Satin Black door panels with Hellephant milled medallion rounds off the bespoke interior.

2018 Dodge Super Charger Concept Drivetrain

  • Supercharged, 7.0-liter V-8
  • Crate engine
  • 1,000 horsepower
  • 950 pound-feet of torque
  • High-performance internals
  • Stock Hellcat transmission
  • Brembo brakes
  • No performance figures yet
2018 Dodge Super Charger Concept
- image 802787

The Super Charger is downright mad when it comes to what’s under the hood. Forget about the Challenger Hellcat and the Demon, this thing will eat them up on the drag strip.

That's because the supercharged, 7.0-liter V-8 under the hood cranks out a massive 1,000 horsepower and 950 pound-feet of torque!

That’s an extra 293 horsepower and 300 pound-feet over the Hellcat and an extra 160 horses and 180 pound-feet more than what the Demon can deliver while using 100-octane fuel. Holy smokes!

So where’s all this oomph coming from? Well, Dodge says it hits the magical mark via bulked-up displacement with four inches of stroke and 4.1 inches of bore, and an improved supercharger (likely based on the 2.7-inch unit from the Demon). Oh, the all-aluminum block is also heavily based on the one used in the Mopar Challenger Drag Pak race cars that compete in the NHRA Factory Stock Showdown class. Dodge and Mopar basically reconfigured the unit for street use.

2018 Dodge Super Charger Concept
- image 802807

But the really big news here is that this monster of an engine isn’t some sort of experimental, never-to-be-produced mill. Nope!

It's actually a crate engine that you can buy starting in the first quarter of 2019. Exactly, you can take it home in a box and drop it in any vehicle you want.

The complete engine assembly includes a water pump, flywheel, front sump oil pan, supercharger with throttle body, fuel injectors and coil packs. It can be paired with the Mopar Crate Hemi Engine Kit for relatively simple plug-and-play by experienced installers and it can be installed in pre-1976 street and off-road vehicles.

The package also includes valve covers taken from the Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye and valve train, valves, locks and retainers pulled from the Challenger SRT Demon. The engine build includes a special high-lift cam, as well as custom-forged pistons. To make things as simple as possible for the installation process, Dodge also added a powertrain control module (PCM), power distribution center, engine wiring harness, chassis harness, accelerator pedal, ground jumper, oxygen sensors, charge air temperature sensors, fuel pump control module, and cam bus interface device to the kit.

2018 Dodge Super Charger Concept
- image 802820

The engine in the Super Charger mates to a stock T-6060, manual six-speed transmission from the Challenger SRT Hellcat, which seems to handle 1,000 horsepower. Of course, Dodge upgraded the braking system of the 1968 Charger too. Braking wasn’t the old Charger’s forte back in the day, so FCA added six-piston Brembo calipers and bigger discs all around.

There's no word as to how this quick the Super Charger is in a straight line, but it should hit 60 mph from a standing start in less than 2.8 seconds.

However, I don’t think it’s quicker than the Challenger SRT Demon, which needs only 2.3 click thanks to its drag-spec tires. Quarter mile times should come in at around 10 seconds, but I’m definitely anxious to see the Super Charger in action at the drag strip for an official quote.

Elephant Heritage

1969 Dodge Charger Daytona Hemi Drivetrain
- image 621308

What I like most about Dodge is that it works really hard to connect new technology and features to iconic symbols from the past. In this case, the Hellephant engine and logo are a nod to the original 426 Hemi V-8, which was nicknamed the Elephant for its power and size.

Introduced in 1964 as the second-generation of Chrysler's hemispherical head design, the Elephant was the biggest engine in racing at the time.

Initially produced for use in NASCAR, it was sold to the public in 1965 in the Dodge Dart, Plymouth Fury, and the Dodge Coronet. More cars were equipped with a street version of the 426 Hemi in 1966, in order to legitimize its use for NASCAR.

Nameplates that were sold with the Elephant engine until it was discontinued in 1971 included the Plymouth Satellite, Dodge Charger, Plymouth Barracuda, Dodge Super Bee, Plymouth Road Runner, Dodge Challenger, and the Plymouth Superbird. In its most powerful iteration, the 426 Hemi delivered 425 horsepower and 490 pound-feet of torque. Needless to say, 1,000 horses and 950 pound-feet seems like a solid evolution for 50 years.

Final Thoughts

2018 Dodge Super Charger Concept Exterior
- image 802793

When it comes to restomods, it really doesn’t get better than a Mopar muscle car with 1,000 freakin’ horsepower. Or at least that’s what I used to think up until now. It does get better if the engine under the hood comes from an OEM. Highly powerful restomods are usually the work of companies providing aftermarket parts and engines, but now you no longer need to take it there. Sure, a restomod created by the Ringbrothers is hard to beat, but it can get awfully expensive. Now, you can just buy a crate engine and stuff it into your favorite classic Mopar. Customize it to be as cool as the Super Charger here, and you’ll definitely win some awards and even a few drag races.

  • Leave it
    • Just a concept car

Further reading

2015 Dodge Charger High Resolution Exterior
- image 549550

Read our full review on the 2018 Dodge Charger.

2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon High Resolution Exterior
- image 729184

Read our full review on the 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon.

2015 Dodge Challenger High Resolution Exterior
- image 549872

Read our full review on the 2018 Dodge Challenger.

1970 - 1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda High Resolution Exterior
- image 569397

Read our full review on the 1970-1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda.

1970 Plymouth Superbird
- image 82460

Read our full review on the 1970 Plymouth Superbird.

Read our full review on the 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona Hemi.

“Hellephant” 426 Supercharged Mopar Crate HEMI® Engine and Kit revealed during Mopar press briefing at 2018 SEMA Show in Las Vegas
“Hellephant” Mopar Crate Engine delivers mammoth numbers: 1,000 horsepower and 950 lb.-ft. of torque
New 1,000-horsepower Crate Engine Kit is another Mopar first-ever feature
Logo nods to legendary Mopar 426 HEMI Engine, nicknamed “elephant” engine for its power and size
“Hellephant” Crate HEMI Engine Kit allows for relatively simple plug-and-play performance
1968 Dodge “Super Charger” Concept unveiled at SEMA features 1,000-horsepower “Hellephant” engine and kit under the hood
Dodge “Super Charger” Concept elevates one of most iconic FCA vehicles with custom modern touches and Mopar products
“Hellephant” 426 Supercharged Mopar Crate HEMI Engine and Kit available first quarter of 2019
More information on Mopar Crate HEMI engines available at www.cratehemi.com
October 30, 2018 , Las Vegas - The Mopar brand is stampeding into the 2018 Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA) Show with a brand-new HEMI®-engine-powered beast: the “Hellephant” 426 Supercharged Mopar Crate HEMI engine, which turns the crank at a mammoth 1,000 horsepower and 950 lb.-ft. of torque.

The “Hellephant” 426 Supercharged Mopar Crate HEMI engine is a Mopar-first for a 1,000-horsepower crate engine kit offered by an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM).

The press briefing today in the Mopar exhibit at SEMA also included the unveiling of the 1968 Dodge “Super Charger” Concept, the perfect package for highlighting the “Hellephant” 426 Supercharged Crate HEMI engine assembly and kit.

“Our enthusiasts crave power and performance and our new ‘Hellephant’ Mopar Crate HEMI engine and kit deliver huge horsepower and torque in a plug-and-play package that is unique in the industry,” said Steve Beahm, Head of Parts & Service (Mopar) and Passenger Car Brands, FCA - North America. “The 1968 Dodge Charger is one of the hottest classic cars, which is why we decided to use it as a starting point for the ‘Super Charger’ Concept. It’s an amazing vehicle and a great showcase for our ‘Hellephant’ engine.”

The “Hellephant” engine hits the magical 1,000 horsepower mark via bulked-up displacement, with 4.0 inches of stroke and bore specs at 4.125 inches. An improved supercharger with a high-efficiency rotor is mounted on the all-aluminum block, which provides huge weight savings to keep the “Hellephant” light. The all-aluminum block, used in Mopar Dodge Challenger Drag Pak race vehicles that dominated the 2018 NHRA Factory Stock Showdown class, was configured for the street in close collaboration with Mopar and engineers from the motorsports world.

The engine and kit’s distinctive “Hellephant” logo provides a nod to the Mopar brand’s past and present. The logo and name call out the legendary 426 HEMI engine, first introduced in 1964 and nicknamed the “elephant” engine for its power and size, as well as the 707-horsepower Mopar “Hellcrate” Engine Kit, revealed last year at the 2017 SEMA Show.

The complete engine assembly includes a water pump, flywheel, front sump oil pan, supercharger with throttle body, fuel injectors and coil packs. The first-ever 1,000 horsepower crate engine assembly offered by an OEM can be paired with the Mopar “Hellephant” 426 Supercharged Mopar Crate HEMI Engine Kit for relatively simple plug-and-play by experienced installers. The engine assembly and kit are designed for installation on pre-1976 street and off-road vehicles.

Additional features of the “Hellephant” 426 Supercharged Mopar Crate HEMI engine include valve covers imported from the Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye and valve train, valves, locks and retainers pulled from the Dodge Challenger SRT Demon. The engine build includes a special high-lift cam, as well as custom-forged pistons.

Dropping in the “Hellephant” is almost turnkey with the “Hellephant” 426 Supercharged Mopar Crate HEMI Engine Kit. The kit includes a powertrain control module (PCM), power distribution center, engine wiring harness, chassis harness, accelerator pedal, ground jumper, oxygen sensors, charge air temperature sensors, fuel pump control module and cam bus interface device. The PCM is unlocked and tuned to pump out 1,000 horsepower and 950 lb.-ft. torque.

As with the “Hellcrate” engine, Mopar will also offer an essential Front End Accessory Drive (FEAD) Kit, which includes an alternator, power-steering pump, belts, pulleys and more, and is among additional engine accessory hardware components available to assist in installing the “Hellephant.”

The kit ships in unique packaging, featuring the “Hellephant” logo and includes in-depth information sheets with helpful installation tips and requirements.

The “Hellephant” 426 Supercharged Mopar Crate HEMI engine assembly and kit will be available in the first quarter of 2019. For more information, visit www.cratehemi.com, and follow Mopar on Twitter (@OfficialMopar) using the new #Hellephant hashtag.

1968 Dodge “Super Charger” Concept
The 1968 Dodge Charger, one of the most iconic vehicles ever built by FCA US, is reimagined with modern elements from the current Dodge Charger SRT and the Dodge Challenger SRT lineup to create a unique package for showcasing the Mopar brand’s new “Hellephant” 426 Supercharged Mopar Crate HEMI engine and kit.

The 1968 Dodge “Super Charger” Concept is adapted to accommodate the “Hellephant” engine, enabling the classic ride to slam 1,000 horsepower to the pavement through a stock T-6060 manual six-speed Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat transmission.

The custom “De Grigio” Grey Metallic classic 1968 Dodge Charger, which is marking its 50th anniversary in 2018, feeds the “Hellephant” fresh air through a supersized hood scoop modeled on that of the Dodge Challenger SRT Demon. The hood features fiberglass construction on the outside with inner-steel construction inside carried over from the original vehicle. The 1968 Charger’s pop-up headlamp design is tweaked to plant Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat headlamps permanently behind the grille. The original’s door handles and drip rails are shaved away, creating a clean, streamlined appearance. Front door vent windows are removed and replaced with a one-piece side glass. The 1971 Duster mirrors add a more modern appearance.

The 1968 Dodge “Super Charger” Concept assumes a “wide body” stance thanks to front and rear fiberglass wheel flares painted “De Grigio” Grey Metallic body color. The front wheels push forward two inches to accommodate the flares and shorten the Charger’s overhang, extending the classic’s wheelbase from 117 inches to 119 inches. Front wheels are stock 20 x 11-inch Devil’s rims pulled from the Challenger SRT Hellcat, while the rears are upsized 21 x 12-inch custom-milled aluminum Devil’s wheels. The body drops 2.5 inches in the rear and 3.5 inches in the front to aggressively hug the pavement. Six-piston Brembos deliver a decisive stopping-power advantage over the 1968 brakes.

Custom fiberglass front and rear bumpers are flushed up and shortened cross-car to provide an integrated design. The custom fiberglass front chin splitter takes influence from the Demon, while the custom rear spoiler is inspired by the modern Charger R/T. The trunk key cylinder lock is shaved and the Satin Black fuel door embellished with a custom-milled aluminum “Hellephant” medallion, one of many unique design touches incorporated throughout the “Super Charger” Concept. Vehicle graphics and badging are Satin Black vinyl decals, including the “Hellephant” logo on the front fenders, “Super Charger” badging above the doors and classic tail stripes at the rear.

The Product Design Office (PDO) team let their imaginations run wild at the tail of the ’68 Charger. The lower exhaust tips are eliminated and replaced with Alfa Romeo Stelvio 5-inch dual-walled exhaust tips re-engineered to run through the taillamp housing. The brake lights have been uniquely reconfigured with LED lights that glow around the exhaust tips.

Inside, door panels and interior trim are Satin Black with the unique “Hellephant” milled medallion applied on the upper door panels. The Dodge Viper steering wheel also carries the “Hellephant” medallion at its center. The instrument panel insert is “De Grigio” Grey Metallic body color and the dash is customized with a full array of Mopar gauges.

The body-color center console holds a manual shifter from the Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat, as well as the ignition button and toggle switches for the headlamps, wipers, fog lights and hazard lights. The stock front seats have been replaced with Dodge Viper seats re-wrapped in Alcantara leather accented with red stitching and are fitted with four-point Sabelt black racing harnesses. The Dodge Challenger SRT Demon seat delete option opens up the rear and also sheds weight while making space for a custom 2-inch roll cage designed to follow the profile and harmonize with the shape of the day light opening (DLO). A Challenger SRT Demon net allows for storage of racing equipment such as helmets and gloves. A black Challenger SRT Hellcat carpet covers the rear of the interior, while the front features custom floor mats modified from the current Charger SRT and Mopar pedal kits for the Challenger.

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