Of all the American Muscle Cars on the Market, the SRT Hellcat Widebody stands out with impressive power and four doors.

These days, the “Hellcat” name is synonymous with power, and that holds true with the Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody. Much like the standard Hellcat, this Charger sits in a very small bubble that includes cars like the Ford Mustang Shelby GT500, Chevy Corvette Stingray, and even the Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye. It’s the unique, four-door configuration that really made the Charger Hellcat stand out, and the widebody model takes that to the next level. Make no mistake, the Widebody charger isn’t just an aesthetic package, and we got to experience just what it has to offer. This is what our week-long experience with 2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody was like.

  • 2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven
  • Year:
    2020
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    V8
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    707
  • Torque @ RPM:
    650
  • Displacement:
    6.2 L
  • 0-60 time:
    3.6 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    196 mph
  • Price:
  • car segment:
  • size:
  • Purpose:
  • body style:
  • Overall:
    8.2/10

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody Overview

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 882663

The Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody is a new model for 2020, and it comes with the promise of more grip, impressive levels of engine cooling, enhanced track capabilities, and improved high-speed aerodynamics. Like the other Hellcats in Dodge’s lineup (The Challenger Hellcat Redeye, withstanding,) the 6.2-liter, HEMI, V-8 under the hood is good for 707 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque. It’s also a bit wider than the standard Charger at 78.3 inches (3.5-inches more than the standard Charger), includes wider tires, wider front and rear tracks, and 20-inch wheels. As a competitor to two-door models like the Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 and Chevy Camaro ZL1, the Charger Hellcat Widebody doesn’t exactly come cheap – its $71,745 sticker price sits at the very top of the Charger food chain, some $26,000 more than the Scat Pack Widebody and more than $40,000 more than the entry-level Charger SXT.

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody Driving Impressions

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 882852

Let’s get right to the nitty gritty and say that we were able to hit 60 mph in a cool 3.5 seconds, one-tenth faster than Dodge claims. It might not be the fastest car on the block – there are a few others out there in this price range that can compete in some capacity, some of which are all-electric – but nothing else on the market can give you such an empowered feeling when you nail launch control just right. Few things in the world can compare to the feeling you get, and that’s coming from a team that just spent a week with what we consider to be one of the best cars in the world, the Nissan GT-R Nismo.

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Exterior
- image 882819

Back to the point at hand, it’s not just the feeling you get as your back sinks into the sports seats and 60 mph creeps up on you fast than expected. The soundtrack that bellows from the exhust of that 6.2-liter V-8 is better than any music you’ll ever hear. Part of this is thanks to its sheer power and torque, but that dual-mode active exhaust systems plays a major role too. The noise alone, at idle or on the fly, is worthy of the muscle car nomenclature.

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Exterior
- image 882856

Burnouts come with ease when you activate the standard line-lock system and the aformentioned launch control is freaking awesome. As far as launch control goes, however, you do kind of have to get used to it. It definitely took us a few tries to get it right but, when we did, we sure did beat Dodge’s claimed 3.6 seconds to 60 mph. One thing of special note here is the handling. You’d expect a car as old as the Charger – it’s bones are at least a decade old, by the way – to get a little squirlely under all that pressure, but that’s – surprisingly – not the case at all. In fact, the steering is a bit heavy, but seems to help keep the Charger in a straight line on powerful sprints.

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Exterior
- image 882801
2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Exterior
- image 882761

Of course, those extra wide tires certainly help in this regard, but probably not as much as they do in the corners. For a large, heavy sedan – the Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody tips the scales at 4,536 pounds – it’s impressively nimble on the road. Again, the steering is heavier than we’re used to but at the same time it’s quick enough, and the feedback helps keep things honest. The wider tires and wider track might help keep the Widebody Charger Hellcat planted, but it’s still not quite as nimble as two-door cars like the Shleby GT500 and Camaro ZL1.

Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody Specifications
Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody
Engine 6.2-Liter HEMI V-8
Transmission 8-Speed AutoStick
Horsepower 707 HP
Torque 650 LB-FT
Driveline RWD
Fuel Gasoline
Fuel Economy 12/21/15
Fuel Capaciy 18.5 Gal
Suspension Adaptive, Ind Front, 5-Link Rear
Steering Electric
Turning Circle 39.0 Feet
Front Tire Size 275/40ZR20
Rear Tire Size 275/40ZR20
0-60 MPH 3.6 Seconds
Top Speed 196 MPH (independent testing)
Power-to-Weight 6.41 LBS Per HP
Curb Weight 4,536 LBS

As far as fuel economy goes, we managed to meet the EPA’s suggested figures of 12 mpg in the city, and 21 mpg on the highway. But, with mixed driving on Florida roads, we actually managed to average around 17 mpg, 2 mpg more than expected across an entire tank of gas – 18.5 gallons. Overall we found the ride to be comfortable, but the suspension is a bit stiff. That’s not surprising given the car’s nature, but it goes without saying that you shouldn’t expect it to ride like a Cadillac, that’s for sure.

How Fast is the Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody?

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Interior Drivetrain
- image 882829

With 707 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque on tap, the Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody is one of the fastest sedans on the market. Period. It can make the sprint to 60 mph in 3.6 seconds and it tops out at 196 mph. Compared to its two-door counterparts, it can hold it’s own quite well. The Ford Mustang Shelby GT500, for example can make the same 3.6-second sprint to 60 mph, but it’s electronically limited to 180 mph. The Chevy Camaro ZL1 will beat the Hellcat Widebody to 60 mph by one-tenth (3.5 seconds) but it can punch all the way up to 202 mph. Granted, the Camaro ZL1 falls short in horsepower and torque, but it’s impressively light at 3,907 pounds. Where the Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody has to tug around 6.41 pounds per horsepower, the Camaro sits at a comfy 6.01 pounds per pony.

Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Fuel Economy

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Drivetrain
- image 882826

Make no mistake, the Charger Hellcat Widebody is a thirsty beast. The EPA estimates that you’ll get just 12 mpg in the city, 21 mpg on the highway, and 15 mpg combined. During our week with the charger we experienced these very same ratings, but after an entire week and a full 18.5-gallon tank’s worth of driving, we managed to average 17 mpg, so it wasn’t quite so bad. This is about on par with models like the Shelby GT500 and Camaro ZL1

2020 Dodge Charger Hellcat Widebody Interior Features and Controls

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Interior
- image 882708

With a price tag that ventures beyond the $70,000 mark, Dodge really had to up the interior quality of the Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody. And, the truth is, the SRT Hellcat Widebody feels like a completely different car inside compared to the lesser models. We wouldn’t go so far as to call it BMW or Mercedes good in terms of material of fit and finish, but it’s pretty high up there. Standard features include:

  • Dual-zone climate control
  • Heated and cooled front seats
  • Front seat lumbar adjustment
  • Extra-soft leather and seat padding
  • Leather-wrapped shift knob
  • Heated, leather, flat-bottom steering wheel
  • LED ambient lighting
  • French-stitched leather throughout the cabin
2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Interior
- image 882845

This list looks good and all, but it really doesn’t represent what the cabin of the Charger SRT Hellcat really offers. The sports seats up front are impressively comfortable and thanks to the thick bolsters they provide impressive support in the bends at higher speeds. Almost every surface is soft to the touch and all controls are fairly easy to reach and their locations seem logical. Despite all of the french-stitched leather and soft-touch surfaces everywhere, you can still opt for things like a suede headliner and carbon-fiber dash trim to spruce things up even more if that’s your thing.

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Interior
- image 882775

Impressively, the Charger’s coupe-like roofline doesn’t compromise on space and five adults can fit in here if you’re selective about who sits in the rear. The front seats might not be as comfortable for those on the larger side because of the bolsters, but the front seats are impressively soft, so it’s not as bad as it is in cars like the BMW Z4, for example. The rear seats aren’t all that supportive, either, but they are comfortable – just be sure to remember you have people back there as they may get some sliding in during hard turns if you’re not careful.

Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody
Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody
Front Headroom 38.6 Inches
Front Leg Room 41.8 Inches
Front Hip Room 56.2 Inches
Rear Head Room 37.9 Inches
Rear Leg Room 40.1 Inches
Rear Hip Room 56.1 Inches
Minimum Cargo Capacity 16.1 cu-ft

Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody Technology and Safety

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Interior
- image 882839

On the forefront of the Charger SRT Hellcat’s technology setup is FCA’s newest Uconnect infotainment system. In this spec, it features an 8.4-inch display which is smaller than what’s offered in other new produces, like the Ram 1500, but it’s sufficient enough to perform admirably. Outside of the standard apps, you can access things like audio, climate control, and even some vehicle information via voice control. We didn’t find it to work as well as Mercedes’ Mbux system, but it’s pretty impressive for something that comes from FCA. Oddly enough, and despite the Widebody’s $70,000 price tag, Dodge still finds it okay to charge you extra for navigation with 3D mapping, so prepare to pony up for that if it’s something you want.

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Interior
- image 882688

Sound is channeled thrgouh the standard six-speaker audio system, but you can option the 19-speaker Harman Kardon audio system, and we’d highly recommend you spend the cheddar on it – the difference in audio quality is phenomenal. The only other option worth considering is the 360-degree camera (the basic backup camera is standard). If you were hoping for some extra safety stuff, well you do get sonar rear park assist, and blind-spot warning systems, but since the extra cooling was needed, there’s no room up front for a front radar sense. As such, the usual safety systems aren’t even available as an option. This means, you’ll have to do without thinks like an adaptive cruise control system, lane-departure warning, lane-keep assist, automatic emergency braking, or forward collision warning.

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Interior
- image 882677

With that out of the way, you find that the infotainment system does have some special drive modes available via the Uconnect system as well as a group of SRT Performance pages. This is also where you’ll have to go to activate things line Launch Control and Line Lock.

How Does Launch Control Work on the Charger SRT Hellcat?

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Interior
- image 882680

Launch Control can be a little tricky, but in the 2020 Charter SRT Hellcat Widebody, it got a little bit easier to use thanks to integration with the Uconnect infotainment system. To activate it, go into the apps section and dive into the SRT performance pages. Inside the “Race Options” category, you’ll find a number of choices, including launch control. Once you select that, the screen will show you a digital tachometer where. Use the vertical meter on the right to adjust your max rpm to anywhere between 1,000 and 2,500 rpm (maximum range is shown by the little blue line to the left of the tach.)

Once you’ve set your max RPM, put your left foot on the brake, and press the “Activate Launch Control” button on the right side of the screen. Apply your right foot to the throttle until the engine reaches the maximum RPM that you set, then release the brake. If you’ve done it properly, you’ll be able to snag a 3.6-second sprint to 60 mph. Of course, in the right conditions, you can get it quicker, as we managed a 3.5-second sprint.

How Does Line Lock Work on the Charger SRT Hellcat?

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Interior
- image 882681

Line Lock isn’t a new tehcnology by any means, but there aren’t a lot of cars on the market that can even be equipped with it as an option, yet the Charger SRT Hellcat comes with it as standard equipment. Basically, the system applies the front brakes so that you can hit the gas an spin the rear tires. This is important for drag strip usage (ever notice how cars on the strip always do a burnout before their pass?) but for us, this makes doing burnouts on the street impressively easy. To activate line lock, simply navigate into the Race Options screen of the Uconnect system, then select the “line lock” option. When the system is ready, you can press the activate button on the right of the screen and the car’s built-in computers will automatically apply the front brakes for you. From here, punch the go-pedal and make some smoke. Just remember, doing this often will decrease the life of your tires and, it should go without saying, this isn’t generally legal on public roads.

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody Exterior Design

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 882667

What sets the Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody apart from the rest of the lineup is, obviously, it’s wider design. The wideness, however, is somewhat superficial as the car isn’t wider anywhere else except the exterior and the front and rear tracks. Extra width for this model compared to the rest of the lineup comes in at 3.5 inches, all of which is attributed to the fender flares and sideskirts. The 20x11-inch aluminum wheels are shod in extra-wide Michelin Pzero 305/35ZR tires. The addition of the extra time elements and wider wheels and tires certainly add to the aggressive and dominating appearance. And, this is a good thing, considering the Charger hasn’t changed much in the 15 years that we’ve known it.

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Exterior
- image 882857

Then again, it does feature a somewhat timeless design that harkens back to the real days of American Muscle. The aggressive hood and stout body lines are primarily responsible for this, but the scallops on the doors, for example, are inspired by those found on the 1970s Charger coupe. The full-width racetrack tail lamps and lip spoiler in the rear help tie the rear end together while the thin, beam-like headlights and low-sitting grille provide the sporty touches for the front end.

All in all, the Charger Hellcat Widebody brings a relatively fresh appearance for a car that’s more than a decade old. It’s certainly time for a new generation to be born but, if you have the $70,000 to spend, you really can’t for wrong with the timeless design of the Charger Widebody.

How Big is the Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody?

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Exterior
- image 882817

Since the Charger Hellcat Widebody is a sedan, it’s actually larger than its two primary competitors, the Shelby GT500 and Camaro ZL1. It’s length sits right around 10-inches longer than both at 201, while the overall width comes in at 78.3-inches. That figure is a bit less than than the competition but 3.5-inches more than the non-widebody Charger. Overall, this isn’t a car you’d want to park in a single-car garage. You can probably make it work, but you’ll want a 1.5-car garage at the very least and a two-car garage would be even better. If nothing else, you’ll need to double check the length because, at 201-inches long, the Charger Widebody could be a tight fit in older garages.

Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody vs. The Competition

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 882852

You have a pretty wide selection of American muscle cars to choose from. It might not be as good as it was back in the late 1960s and early 1970s, but there are some decent modern performers. The Charger kind of stands on its own as a four-door muscle car, so we’ve have to get a little creative and compare the Charger Widebody to some of the better two-door muscle cars on the market.

Ford Mustang Shelby GT500

left right

If you’re in the market for a new, modern-day muscle car, you really can’t go wrong with a car like the 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500. Under the hood sits one of the best V-8s to ever come out of Ford – a 5.2-liter that’s good for a cool 760 horsepower and 625 pound-feet of torque. All of that power finds it way to the rear wheels via a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. The 60-mph sprint is equal to that of the Charger Hellcat Widebody at 3.6 seconds, but Ford and Shelby has chosen to limit top speed to just 180 mph.

left right

In terms of appearance, the GT500 isn’t all that different from the Charger widebody in terms of having a timeless design. Of course, it’s much sporiter that a four-door sedan thanks to the fastback design style. As a car that’s designed for on-road and track use, you’ll find the GT500 is about ass aggressive as it can get. The huge bubbly hood stands out among anything else on the road and that rear spoiler is there for more than just looks. Keep in mind, however, that the Shleby GT500 doesn’t come cheap. In fact, it’s even more expensive than the Charger Hellcat Widebody, with an MSRP of $72,900, and that’s before options, taxes, delivery, and the like.

Dodge Charger Hellcat Widebody vs. Ford Mustang Shelby GT500
Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody Ford Mustang Shelby GT500
Engine 6.2-Liter HEMI V-8 5.2-Liter V-8
Transmission 8-Speed AutoStick 7-Speed DCT
Horsepower 707 HP 760 HP
Torque 650 LB-FT 625 LB-FT
Driveline RWD RWD
Fuel Gasoline Gasoline
Fuel Economy 12/21/15 12/18/14
Fuel Capaciy 18.5 Gal 16.0 Gal
Suspension Adaptive, Ind Front, 5-Link Rear Four-Wheel Independent
Steering Electric Electric
Turning Circle 39.0 Feet TBA
Front Tire Size 305/35ZR20 305/30R20
Rear Tire Size 305/35ZR20 315/30R20
0-60 MPH 3.6 Seconds 3.6 Seconds
Top Speed 196 MPH (independent testing) 180 MPH (limited)
Power-to-Weight 6.41 LBS Per HP 5.55 LBS Per HP

Read our full review on the 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500

Chevy Camaro ZL1

left right

If you’re looking for a muscle car that looks aggressive, has some track-ready DNA, and will bring you all the thrills you could ever want behind the wheel without breaking the bank, then the Chevy Camaro ZL1 might be for you. It serves as the range-topping Camaro in the lineup and is powered by a supercharged, 6.2-liter V-8 that’s good for 650 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque. Now, this might be less than what’s offered by either the Charger Hellcat or the GT500, but the Camaro ZL1 is impressively light as well, tipping the scales at just 3,907 pounds. This gives the Carmaro ZL1 a weight ratio of 6.01-pounds per horsepower – a figure that allows the ZL1 to sprint to 60 mph in 3.5 seconds on the way to a top speed of 202 mph. That’s right it’s faster than both the Charger Widebody and the Shelby GT500.

left right

The thing to remember about the Camaro, however, is that while it may be superior in terms of performance, at least to some degree, it’s still built by GM. If you don’t know what that means, the easy way to explain it is that GM isn’t exactly the master of interior quality. Don’t expect the Camaro ZL1 to feel anywhere near as premium as the GT500 or the Charger Hellcat Widebody. Sure, you’ll have leather other decent materials throughout, but there will still be plenty of cheap plastic bits too. Then again, the Camaro ZL1 is also considerably cheaper, carrying a price of $62,000 before options, taxes, and destination chargers, among others.

Dodge Charger Hellcat Widebody vs. Chevrolet Camaro ZL1
Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody Chevy Camaro ZL1
Engine 6.2-Liter HEMI V-8 6.2-Liter V-8
Transmission 8-Speed AutoStick 6-Speed Manual
Horsepower 707 HP 650 HP
Torque 650 LB-FT 650 LB-FT
Driveline RWD RWD
Fuel Gasoline Gasoline
Fuel Economy 12/21/15 14/20/16
Fuel Capaciy 18.5 Gal 19.0 Gal
Suspension Adaptive, Ind Front, 5-Link Rear Four-Wheel Independent
Steering Electric Electroic
Turning Circle 39.0 Feet 38.1 Feet
Front Tire Size 275/40ZR20 305/30ZR20
Rear Tire Size 275/40ZR20 305/30ZR20
0-60 MPH 3.6 Seconds 3.5 Seconds
Top Speed 196 MPH (independent testing) 202 MPH
Power-to-Weight 6.41 LBS Per HP 6.01 LBS Per HP

Read our full review on the 2020 Chevy Camaro ZL1

Final Thoughts

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody – Driven Exterior
- image 882820

The Dodge Charger, in general, might be old, but the Hellcat SRT Widebody feels like a modern muscle car and has the power to back that up. Thanks to design cues borrowed from the 70s-era Charger Coupe, this model has a timeless design that is both aggressive and sporty. There’s no doubt that it’s due for an update, but it’s still one of the better cars on the market today. And, with a price in the low-$70,000 range, it offers more power and better performance that comparable cars that carry much heavier price tags. The Charger Hellcat Widebody might not be for everyone, but if you want a fast, four-door with an excellent sound track, then the Charger Hellcat Widebody is definitely worth your consideration.

  • Leave it
    • Expensive for a car that’s more than a decade old
    • Hasn’t changed much over teh years
    • Rear seats could be more supportive
Philippe Daix
Obsessive and Compulsive Automotive Expert - phil@topspeed.com
Always on the lookout for the latest automotive news, Philippe Daix is our most senior editor and founder of TopSpeed.com. He likes to see himself as a consumer advocate with a mission to educate motorheads of all ages.  Read More
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