Back to Ferrari

Ferrari 166

1948 - 1950 Ferrari 166 Inter

1948 - 1950 Ferrari 166 Inter High Resolution Exterior
- image 660130
  • Ferrari 166 Inter
  • Year:
    1948- 1950
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • body style:

By 1948 Ferrari had firmly established itself as a manufacturer of top-level racing cars. The next step was to take that engineering and performance excellence to the streets. History has shown that this was a wise decision, and that legacy started with the 166 Inter, Ferrari’s first grand touring car.

Compared to the California and 458 Italia, the 166 Inter seems like a reasonably tame vehicle, even by the standards of its era. Essentially a coachbuilt body on Ferrari’s long-wheelbase racing chassis, the 166 Inter was named for Scuderia Inter, the team that successfully campaigned Ferrari 166 models in 1948, and for the displacement of each of its twelve cylinders (166 cc). The 166 Inter debuted at the Paris Motor Show in October of 1949, with a body by Carozzeria Touring. Stabilimenti Farina, Ghia, Finale, Pininfarina and Bertone also produced bodies for the three dozen or so Inters that were built between 1948 and 1950. The grand tourers were equipped as full roadgoing vehicles, but a few actually did make it to the track and displayed performance worthy of the name.

Though demure by modern standards, the Ferrari 166 Inter was the start of a storied legacy of roadgoing Ferraris, and helped to create the template of the “grand touring” car that influences vehicles to this day. As one of the first Ferrari models to sell well outside of Italy, it was a significant influence on the marque’s reputation as well.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 166 Inter.

 

Latest Ferrari 166 news and reviews:

1948 - 1950 Ferrari 166 Inter

1948 - 1950 Ferrari 166 Inter

By 1948 Ferrari had firmly established itself as a manufacturer of top-level racing cars. The next step was to take that engineering and performance excellence to the streets. History has shown that this was a wise decision, and that legacy started with the 166 Inter, Ferrari’s first grand touring car.

Compared to the California and 458 Italia, the 166 Inter seems like a reasonably tame vehicle, even by the standards of its era. Essentially a coachbuilt body on Ferrari’s long-wheelbase racing chassis, the 166 Inter was named for Scuderia Inter, the team that successfully campaigned Ferrari 166 models in 1948, and for the displacement of each of its twelve cylinders (166 cc). The 166 Inter debuted at the Paris Motor Show in October of 1949, with a body by Carozzeria Touring. Stabilimenti Farina, Ghia, Finale, Pininfarina and Bertone also produced bodies for the three dozen or so Inters that were built between 1948 and 1950. The grand tourers were equipped as full roadgoing vehicles, but a few actually did make it to the track and displayed performance worthy of the name.

Though demure by modern standards, the Ferrari 166 Inter was the start of a storied legacy of roadgoing Ferraris, and helped to create the template of the “grand touring” car that influences vehicles to this day. As one of the first Ferrari models to sell well outside of Italy, it was a significant influence on the marque’s reputation as well.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 166 Inter.

Read more
1948 Ferrari 166 S

1948 Ferrari 166 S

It is a matter of some dispute as to which car should be considered the first Ferrari production model. While the first road legal car to wear a prancing horse badge was the 125 S, only two of these were ever made, and there was only one 159 S, the car that came after the 125 S. It was only once Ferrari moved from the 159 S to the 166 S that Ferrari’s cars became anything more than what we would today consider a prototype. That’s not to say that the 166 S was built in particularly large quantities, but it was more than two, and the related 166 MM and 166 Inter were built in even larger quantities still.

Ferrari had been around for some time as a racing team before it ever started building cars of its own. Much of this had to do with Enzo Ferrari’s complete inability to get along with other humans, as a nasty split from Alfa Romeo left him without a marque to race for. He started building his own cars after WWII, and the 166 S was the first one to achieve real success in racing, thus spawning an actual production run of the car.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 166 S.

Read more
1949 Ferrari 166 MM Touring Barchetta

1949 Ferrari 166 MM Touring Barchetta

Ferrari was not originally founded with the intention of making road cars. Scuderia Ferrari was founded in 1929 as a privateer racing team, and was later made the Alfa Romeo works team. Due to friction between Alfa and Enzo Ferrari (surprise!), Ferrari would produce its first car in 1940. But this was just for racing, and it was only after rebuilding the factory following its destruction by Allied bombing in WWII that Ferrari expanded into building road cars. But, these early road cars only happened to be road legal. They were still built primarily for racing, and Ferraris from the ’40s were mostly built in small numbers and with almost no amenities.

Early cars were built in very small numbers, with just two units of the first car, the 125 S, being made. And the second model was nothing more than a prototype, the 159 S. The first real production model was the 166, which existed in a few different forms. There was an actual touring car, Ferrari’s first, and a couple of racing models. The first racing model was the 166 S, but this was soon replaced by the car you see here, the 166 MM, an evolved version of the S.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 166 MM Touring Barchetta.

Read more