Cars Ferrari Ferrari 212

Ferrari 212

1950 - 1953 Ferrari 212 Inter

1950 - 1953 Ferrari 212 Inter
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The Ferrari 212 Inter was revealed in 1951 at the Brussels Motor Show as a replacement for the 166 and 195 Inter. The 212 was built between late 1950 and 1953, in Inter and Export model configuration. Ferrari built 82 units of the 212, more than any other Ferrari before. The 212 was offered in three different body versions: berlinetta, cabriolet and coupe and carried coachwork by Ghia, Ghia Aigle, Pininfarina, Stabilimenti Farina, Touring, Vignale, and even the British firm Abbott.

1950 - 1953 Ferrari 212 Inter
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The difference between the Inter and the Export version was made by the wheelbase: the Export version were built on a 2250 mm wheelbase chassis and they were normally carrying an E or ED suffix to the number, whilst the Inter road models were constructed on a 2600 mm wheelbase chassis in the odd number road car sequence, initially with an EL suffix, and then with an EU suffix.

The 212 Inter were the first models equipped with left-hand drive as standard, as until then the standard steering layout had been right-hand drive, in the racing tradition.

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Latest Ferrari 212 news and reviews:

1952 Ferrari 212 Export Barchetta Auctioned For About $7.5 Million

1952 Ferrari 212 Export Barchetta Auctioned For About $7.5 Million

With the notable exception of homologation specials, classic race cars don’t usually sell for really noteworthy sums of money. This is partly because they often aren’t street legal, and also because they simply don’t offer the glamour or good looks of high-end sports or grand-touring cars. So when a race car does sell for several million dollars, it’s the sort of thing which gets our attention. At RM Sotheby’s Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este in Italy, a 1952 Ferrari 212 Export Barchetta race car went for $7.5 million, a huge sum of money for anything, but especially a race car.

Though Enzo Ferrari had been involved in car making and racing for many years prior, the company as we know it today has only existed since 1947, so this 212 Export is a very early model. It is a rare model, with only 28 units made, and even the 212 Inter (the road-going model that the racer is based on) only had 82 units produced. And this particular car is a matching number example that is Ferrari Classiche certified.

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Chris Harris Reviews Ferrari 212: Video

Chris Harris Reviews Ferrari 212: Video

Taking a refreshing break from vaporizing the tires of the latest 1,000-horsepower hypercar, Chris Harris instead headed to Italy to drive a very special old Ferrari. This stunning 1952 Ferrari 212 Export wears barchetta bodywork from Carrozzeria Touring and competed in the 1956 Mille Miglia and 1952 and 1953 Targa Florio. Even though a modern hot-hatch would leave it in its wake, this was a seriously quick car in its day. With a 160-horsepower, 2.6-liter V-12, it was the 1950s equivalent of a modern P2 Le Mans racer, as is mentioned in this video, and is in remarkably good condition, given its rough-and-tumble racing history.

Just listening to the tiny, yet charismatic, V-12 sing through some lovely Italian countryside is enough reason to watch this excellent 11-minute video. I could probably listen to it rev and pop and bang on overrun all day. So, join Mr. Harris as he puts on a funny helmet and takes the 212 out on some fantastic Italian roads. Also, this very car will be crossing the auction block at the Villa Erba RM event at Lake Como, Italy on May 23. It’s expected to sell for as much as $8 million — the cost of about six or seven of those hybridhypercars.

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1950 - 1953 Ferrari 212 Inter

1950 - 1953 Ferrari 212 Inter

The Ferrari 212 Inter was revealed in 1951 at the Brussels Motor Show as a replacement for the 166 and 195 Inter. The 212 was built between late 1950 and 1953, in Inter and Export model configuration. Ferrari built 82 units of the 212, more than any other Ferrari before. The 212 was offered in three different body versions: berlinetta, cabriolet and coupe and carried coachwork by Ghia, Ghia Aigle, Pininfarina, Stabilimenti Farina, Touring, Vignale, and even the British firm Abbott.

The difference between the Inter and the Export version was made by the wheelbase: the Export version were built on a 2250 mm wheelbase chassis and they were normally carrying an E or ED suffix to the number, whilst the Inter road models were constructed on a 2600 mm wheelbase chassis in the odd number road car sequence, initially with an EL suffix, and then with an EU suffix.

The 212 Inter were the first models equipped with left-hand drive as standard, as until then the standard steering layout had been right-hand drive, in the racing tradition.

Read more