Cars Ferrari Ferrari 250

1958 - 1960 Ferrari 250 California

1958 - 1960 Ferrari 250 California High Resolution Exterior
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When talking about the Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder, you are sort of talking about two different cars, the long-wheelbase version and the later short-wheelbase version. The cars debuted a few years apart, and have different bodies and engines with different states of tune. But both are built with the same idea in mind, and you could almost call them two generations of the same car, if that wasn’t such a difficult word to apply to the 250. All Californias, whatever the wheelbase, wore Scaglietti bodywork, and all of them were convertibles.

Throughout the ’50s and early ’60s, small European roadsters had become incredibly popular in North America. On the cheaper end of the spectrum, MG was selling huge numbers of cars in this newly discovered market, and in 1957, Ferrari debuted this new version of the 250 as a high-end convertible specifically for the U.S. market. It was based on the 250 GT Cabriolet Pininfarina, but was a higher-performance version of the car, produced in much smaller numbers. In theory, the Pininfarina was meant to be sold in Europe, and the California in America, but those were more suggestions than rules, and certainly today you’ll find examples of both on either side of the Atlantic.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 250 California.

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Latest Ferrari 250 news and reviews:

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Becomes The Most Expensive Car Ever Sold in an Auction

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Becomes The Most Expensive Car Ever Sold in an Auction

Prices of Ferrari 250 GTOs are going through the roof!

As expected, the 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO that was tipped to sell for $45 million at the RM Sotheby’s auction over the weekend beat its own expectation, selling for a record $48.4 million at the auction’s sale in Monterey, California. The sale not only beat the previous auction record for a Ferrari 250 GTO — another model sold for $38.115 million in 2013 — it also became the most expensive car ever sold at an auction.

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1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE)

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE)

A genuine four-seater sports car

While the Prancing Horse is best known for its top-shelf performance vehicles and winning racing machines, even Maranello’s finest must occasionally bend to the whims of the passenger vehicle market. But don’t see it as a compromise - rather, it’s best seen as a combination of speed and usability, catapulting the commonplace people mover to the extraordinary realm of apexes and checkered flags. Such is the case with the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2, the brand’s first genuine four-seater model.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE).

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1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Estimated At $45 Million will be Auctioned in August

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Estimated At $45 Million will be Auctioned in August

Better get those checkbooks ready, folks! This Ferrari 250 GTO is going to fetch a huge price!

A few weeks after a Ferrari 250 GTO sold for a record-breaking $70 million, another example of the world’s most sought-after car is going to be put up for auction at the RM Sotheby’s auction in Monterey, California on August 24. The specific 250 GTO in question is estimated to fetch $45 million at the auction. It’s also just the third time a Ferrari 250 GTO is going to be offered for public sale since the calendar flipped to 2000. As much as must-have cars are concerned, there’s no denying which car sits as the unquestioned king of that list. It’s the Ferrari 250 GTO, and you can get your hands on one this August provided that you can afford it.

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The Founder of WeatherTech Just Paid $70 Million For a Ferrari 250 GTO

The Founder of WeatherTech Just Paid $70 Million For a Ferrari 250 GTO

It’s now the most expensive car in the world

David McNeal, the founder of WeatherTech, just paid a record-breaking $70 million for a 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO that is so pristine it’s regarded as the third or fourth best example in the world by well-known Ferrari historian, Marcel Massini.

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Ferrari 250 GT California Spider Sold for $17.99 Million at Auction

Ferrari 250 GT California Spider Sold for $17.99 Million at Auction

It’s probably worth every penny too

What would you do with $17.99 million if you had one day to spend it? Would you use all of it to buy gold? Perhaps toss in a few million on bitcoins? Maybe you should buy an exotic car or two while you’re at it. None of these scenarios compares to what one man did to his $17.99 million. He used all of that amount to buy a 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione by Scaglietti during RM Sotheby’s recent auction in New York City. Now that’s a high roller.

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Petrolicious Profiles The Ferrari 250 LM: Video

Petrolicious Profiles The Ferrari 250 LM: Video

Indulge in the beauty of a Prancing Horse race legend

“I could stare at that car forever,” begins Remo Ferri, owner of the gorgeous 250 LM you see here. One look is all you’ll need to understand – this Ferrari is mechanical, an instrument for speed shaped into art. Lift the rear clamshell, and the feeling of craftsmanship is palpable. There’s a certain kind of purity to it, a characteristic most obvious when sitting in the stripped-down cockpit with the loud pedal pinned. This is a car that only offers what you need to go fast. Plucked from the ‘60s-era of sports car racing, the 250 LM was one of Ferrari’s first mid-engine sports cars. The body is made from aluminum, and with 320 horsepower properly routed to the rear axle, it could reach a top speed of 180 mph, a staggering figure for its day, and enough to clinch a win at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1965. This is also one of the most expensive cars in the world, but it’s about a lot more than just money. In this sub-six-minute video, Petrolicious dives straight to the heart of the matter, taking the audience for a ride through stunning cinematography and passionate narration, all while the sound of that V-12 rampaging down the straight creates copious aural intoxication.

The passion of the car’s owner is infectious, and over the course of the video, it becomes obvious why this is considered one of the most valuable cars in the world. Never mind the limited production, never mind the pedigree, never mind the badge. Just look at it, take in its curving lines, absorb the sound it makes, and it’ll all become crystal clear. This is one of the greatest Ferraris ever made, and indeed, one of the greatest cars ever created.

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1958 - 1960 Ferrari 250 California

1958 - 1960 Ferrari 250 California

When talking about the Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder, you are sort of talking about two different cars, the long-wheelbase version and the later short-wheelbase version. The cars debuted a few years apart, and have different bodies and engines with different states of tune. But both are built with the same idea in mind, and you could almost call them two generations of the same car, if that wasn’t such a difficult word to apply to the 250. All Californias, whatever the wheelbase, wore Scaglietti bodywork, and all of them were convertibles.

Throughout the ’50s and early ’60s, small European roadsters had become incredibly popular in North America. On the cheaper end of the spectrum, MG was selling huge numbers of cars in this newly discovered market, and in 1957, Ferrari debuted this new version of the 250 as a high-end convertible specifically for the U.S. market. It was based on the 250 GT Cabriolet Pininfarina, but was a higher-performance version of the car, produced in much smaller numbers. In theory, the Pininfarina was meant to be sold in Europe, and the California in America, but those were more suggestions than rules, and certainly today you’ll find examples of both on either side of the Atlantic.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 250 California.

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Ferrari 250 GTO Unleashed on the Road: Video

Ferrari 250 GTO Unleashed on the Road: Video

There are many reasons why the Ferrari 250 GTO is such a desirable and expensive classic. It’s gorgeous to look at, it won many races all over the world, and it was built in only 39 examples. More importantly, the 250 GTO is considered the perfect embodiment of the classic Ferrari berlinetta and moves about using one of the most iconic V-12s ever and a dog-leg manual transmission. Tipping the scales at only 1,940 pounds, it was amazingly quick in the 1960s and it’s impressively fast for a 50-year-old car. Last but not least, the 3.0-liter V-12 has one of the most exciting notes you can get with a Ferrari.

If that’s not enough to convince you, maybe this video from Petrolicious showing a pristine 250 GTO doing a hillclimb sprint will.

There is a catch though. The vehicle you’re about to see isn’t the familiar and gorgeous 250 GTO we’re all familiar with. As it’s revealed at the end of the seven-minute clip, the race car is one of the three Series II models Ferrari built in 1964, toward the end of production. Instead of the standard GT body, these versions received a more aerodynamic shell similar to the 250 LM. While the front end was pretty much the same, save for mild tweaks and the new side gills, the roof was lower and shorter, making way for a proper deck lid around back. It wasn’t as sexy as the regular 250 GTO, but it was just as fast and nimble on the race track.

Hit play for seven minutes of pure classic Ferrari action.

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Collection Of Eight Ferraris Worth More Than $11 Million Heading To Auction

Collection Of Eight Ferraris Worth More Than $11 Million Heading To Auction

Collecting classic vehicles is quite an expensive hobby if you fancy exotic sports cars, but nothing can drain your multi-million-dollar bank account quicker than a Ferrari collection. As a renowned Ferrari collector and long-time customer, Tony Shooshani knows this better than anyone else, having amassed a Prancing Horse stable that includes some of the rarest models ever built. After years of buying them, Shooshani has now decided to part with eight of his Ferraris, all of which will be auctioned by Gooding & Company at its annual two-day Scottsdale Auctions between January 29-30, 2016.

If you were planning to start your own Ferrari collection, now is as good a time as any. Given you have at least $11 million to spare, that is!

The lot includes some of finest Ferrari supercars ever produced, as well as a couple of classic entry-level models that can still be had for less than one million bucks. The most expensive units are a 1995 F50 and a 2003 Enzo, which are estimated to fetch more than $2.5 million each. There is also a 1990 F40 that Gooding & Company estimates will fetch between $1.3 and 1.6 million.

Classic models include a 250 GT Cabriolet and a 250 GT Lusso, which, not surprisingly, are likely to change owners for more than $2 million. At the more affordable end of the list, there’s a 1969 Dino 206 GT ($700,000-$800,000), a 1984 512 BBi ($400,000-$475,000), and a 1988 328 GTS ($125,000-$150,000).

All told, the estimated value of the entire lot sits between $11.6 and $13.5 million. That’s a lot of dough if you’re not familiar with how much classic Ferraris fetch nowadays, but not that much considering that a 250 GTO can change owners for as much as $50 million.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1953 Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Vignale

1953 Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Vignale

Ferrari was still very new to the world of building road cars in the early ’50s. Enzo had been involved in racing and the design and building of race cars for decades, but translating that into something for regular people (albeit wealthy regular people) to buy was still being figured out. It was the 250 that would change things for Ferrari, but in the early days of the model line, Ferrari was still figuring things out. It was an era when coach-built luxury cars were starting to disappear, but Ferrari was determined to keep using them for the 250 line, first launched in 1953. Most 250s were built by Pininfarina, including early examples like the Europa, but a handful were built by Vignale.

These early 250s differ from the later models, particularly those of the ’60s, in a number of ways, but it is most notable that at first there were only two versions of the car, the Europa and the Export, obviously intended for different markets. Many more varieties of the 250 would come later, but in 1953, the only way to get something different from the other 250s was to get a coach-built one.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1953 Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Vignale.

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Ferrari 250 GTE Gets Chevrolet Engine: Video

Ferrari 250 GTE Gets Chevrolet Engine: Video

Though it’s not as rare and sought-after as the Ferrari 250 GTO, the 250 GTE is a legendary Prancing Horse in its own right. Launched as the first large-production four-seat Ferrari in 1960, the GTE, which was built in almost 1,000 units, was a major contributor to the company’s financial well-being in the early 1960s. Nowadays, 250 GTEs change hands for anything between $250,000 and $500,000, but some models can fetch close to $800,000. That’s a lot of dough, but given some Ferraris are auctioned for more than $1,000,000, the classic four-seater is somewhat of a bargain.

But despite their value, not all 250 GTEs are restored to their original specification. The model you’re about to see in the this video is no longer powered by the iconic 3.0-liter Colombo V-12, but a supercharged V-8. Quite the blasphemy, huh?

Well, not quite.

You see, this weird Ferrari hot rod isn’t much of a Ferrari anymore. The shell is the only component sourced from an original GTE after everything else was stripped off and sent to Italy to make a replica of the iconic 250 GTO.

Granted, Joe’s Chevy-powered Ferrari might upset purists that don’t known the story behind it, but it’s definitely a unique take on the hot rod concept. Hit play to find out more about it and to hear it rev its new V-8 powerplant.

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1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti

1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione ’Tour de France’ by Scaglietti

Today the words “Tour de France” are usually associated with a grueling bicycle race, the highest-profile and most important race in the cycling world. But from 1899 to 1986 it was also a car race, and like the bicycle race, it took place over several days and in a wide variety of conditions. Since it included circuit races, hill climbs and a drag race, it required a thoroughly well rounded car, and Ferrari had just the thing in the mid-’50s. The 250 GT LWB Berlinetta would dominate this race during the second half of the ’50s, and racing versions of the 250 GT LWB would adopt the “Tour de France” name.

The 250 GT LWB Berlinetta Competizione was the most successful racing model of the whole 250 series, taking more wins than even the legendary 1962-1964 Ferrari 250 GTO. The Tour de France cars also served as the inspiration for the GTO; the GTO was essentially just an updated version of the same idea a few years later. And even though it is a Competizione model, sold to be a race car and bought new by a racing team, it is still absolutely beautiful.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione ’Tour de France’ by Scaglietti.

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1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Speciale by Bertone

1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Speciale by Bertone

Just trying to keep all of the different varieties of the Ferrari 250 straight is a fairly daunting task. There were 23 different varieties, but each of these is usually further subdivided and there are versions of the car that were only produced in single-digit numbers. But even among those incredibly rare versions of the car, this one still manages to stand out. It is a 250 GT short-wheelbase from 1962 with special one-off bodywork by Bertone for Nuccio Bertone himself. The car belonged to Nuccio, but he used it extensively as a show car, showing off the coachbuilding abilities of his company.

The car has changed hands a number of times, and at one point was used as a daily driver in California for a full 13 years. It has since been fully restored and is in absolutely pristine condition. It was recently auctioned by Gooding and Co., where it became one of the most expensive cars ever sold at public auction. Enzo Ferrari was so impressed by the car that when Bertone sent him a Christmas present that year, he sent back a letter praising the bodywork of the Speciale and signed it “Your – if you will permit me – friend, Enzo Ferrari.”

Continue reading for my full review of this one-off Ferrari.

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This Man Built A 1959 Ferrari 250 TR From Scratch: Video

This Man Built A 1959 Ferrari 250 TR From Scratch: Video

Many of us dream about owning a classic Ferrari, especially from the iconic 250 lineage, which includes cars such as the 1962-1964 Ferrari 250 GTO, the 1958-1960 Ferrari 250 California, or the Le Mans-winning 1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa. Unfortunately, these vehicles change owners for tens of millions of dollars, which puts them out of our reach. This was also the case for Peter Giacobbi, who ofted asked himself what his boyhood heroes Juan Manuel Fangio and Graham Hill experienced when they drove cars like the Ferrari 250 TR. He obviously couldn’t afford a real Ferrari but he didn’t give up and built his very own 250 TR from scratch.

He started off after he found a handmade aluminum body replica of the car. He then copied the chassis, had the dashboard and the instruments made, and sourced several other body parts. Though some things are different from the original, his 250 TR has many original parts, which he got from Ferrari owners. Because he couldn’t find an original 3.0-liter V-12, he used a 4.4-liter unit and modified it to resemble the 250’s.

Owning just a replica might be upsetting to some, but not to Giacobbi, who says the car helped him realize that his boyhood heroes were actually supermen. “They’re not only heroes, they’re supermen to have driven at the high speeds for the distances they did is an absolute miracle," he told Petrolicious. Check out the video above for more on this story.

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1963 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' By Scaglietti

1963 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta ’Lusso’ By Scaglietti

It can be difficult to keep all of the different Ferrari 250s straight, as the number was attached to nearly every prancing horse for a period running from the early ’50s until well into the ’60s. But the 250 GT/L Berlinetta “Lusso” does at least give you hint as to its purpose right in the name, as “lusso” is Italian for “luxury.” While many of the iterations of the 250 were made to skirt the line between road car and track car, the Lusso was an unapologetic luxury road car, to an extent that was uncharacteristic (though not entirely unheard of) with Ferrari at the time.

RM Auctions has one of the just 350 units of the Lusso built, and it’s going up for auction soon. This particular example is the 21st Lusso ever built, which went to a dealer in Belgium in early 1963. Interestingly, the car wasn’t actually sold to a private owner until 1967, after it had made a trip across the Atlantic to the U.S. It made its way back to Europe in the ’90s, and underwent an extensive restoration from 2009 to 2011, and all numbers are still matching.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta ’Lusso’ By Scaglietti.

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EVO Reviews 1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Competizione: Video

EVO Reviews 1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Competizione: Video

Call me crazy, but I actually think the Ferrari 250 GT Short Wheelbase is a better-looking car than the much rarer 250 GTO. Exhibit A is this pristine Giallo Fly 1960 250 GT SWB that will cross the auction block at the Villa Erba RM Auctions event in Italy later this month, where its expect to sell for over $10 million.

The folks at RM Auction were kind enough to invite EVO Magazine’s Jethro Bovington to ogle some classic Ferraris at Villa Erba on the shores of Lake Como, and later sent him out for a drive in the 250 GT SWB.

This example is one of about 45 aluminum-body competition models. Four like it swept the top four positions at Le Mans in 1960, but this one never actually saw any period competition. Instead, a doctor in Florence bought it new and used it as a daily driver. The modern equivalent would be buying a 458 Italia GTE class Le Mans racer and driving it to work every day.

Since then the car, chassis No. 1953 GT, has undergone a full restoration and been prepped for both vintage competitions, like Tour Auto and Le Mans classics, and concours events. A race-spec, 3.0-liter Colombo V-12 sits under the hood, producing 280 horsepower, but the car’s original Tipo 168U V-12 is also included.

Turn up the speakers. The V-12 sounds glorious.

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Two Multi-Million $ Ferraris Will Be Auctioned For Charity

Two Multi-Million $ Ferraris Will Be Auctioned For Charity

Old Ferraris tend to bring boatloads of money at auction, as do cars whose auction proceeds go to charity. Combine the two and watch money fly around the room like a class-five tornado inside Fort Knox.

That’s what’s happening this October, when not one, but two classic Ferraris will cross the auction block at the H&H Classics event at the Imperial War Museum in England. Both the 1960 250 GT SWB and 1967 275 GTB/4 are expected to earn millions, with all proceeds going towards a new boat for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, a non-profit lifesaving organization that operates in the waters around the United Kingdom.

The Ferraris were left as a legacy donation to the RNLI by businessman and car collector Richard Colton (described by his friends as a quiet but friendly fellow, who always seemed a bit nervous on boats), and will fund construction of a new lifeboat to be named the Richard and Caroline Colton, after him and his late wife.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider by Scaglietti

1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider by Scaglietti

Few postwar classic cars can match the insanely high prices commanded by the Ferrari 250 in its various forms. And of the forms that the 250 took, it is generally the 250 GTO and 250 GT SWB California Spider that fetch the very highest prices. These are prized because of their rarity, and with RM Auction set to auction off a 250 GT SWB California Spider soon, it has caught the attention of collectors everywhere. Not only were there just 56 units of the Spider produced, but only 16 of these units were built with open headlights, this 1961 model being one of those 16. RM auctions is therefore expecting the car to go for 11-13 million euros.

The California Spider was built essentially at the request of a couple of American Ferrari distributors. It is based on the 250 GT Berlinetta Tour de France, but with a convertible top for increased enjoyment of the lovely California weather. Most of these cars were of course sent to the U.S., but a handful stayed in Europe, of which this is one. It was bought by its current owner in 2007, and was sent to Ferrari Classiche shortly thereafter for restoration. This was completed in 2010, and you can see, it is absolutely gorgeous.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider by Scaglietti.

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"Barn-Find" Ferrari 250 GT California SWB Auctioned For $18,5 Million

"Barn-Find" Ferrari 250 GT California SWB Auctioned For $18,5 Million

You’d think the days are gone when someone stumbles across a secret car collection hidden from public view, but that is exactly what happened in 2014, when over 100 rare European cars in various conditions were discovered in France. Dubbed by many as the barn find of the century, the discovery included a Ferrari 250 GT California SWB, one of only 55 built. The model usually fetches over $10 million at classic car auctions, so it should be no surprise that the unrestored barn-find went for the equivalent of no less than $18.5 million (as of 2/10/2015).

Built in 1961, the car in question was apparently owned at some point by French actor Alain Delon, and has been part of the collection of industrialist Roger Baillon since the late 1960s, alongside other rarities from Bugatti, Pahnard et Levassor, Delahaye, Delage, Hispano Suiza, Maserati and Porsche.

On Friday 6 February 2015, 59 cars found in the secret collection were auctioned off during an event called Salon Retromobile, with the auction lasting eleven hours and bringing in almost 1,600 bidders on site and another thousand or so online. The 250 GT California was by far the most coveted model, with the car fetching way much than originally expected, despite being in the condition it was.

Click past the jump to read more about this awesome barn find.

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Of the 20 Most Expensive Cars Sold at Auction in 2014, 14 Wore a Ferrari Badge

Of the 20 Most Expensive Cars Sold at Auction in 2014, 14 Wore a Ferrari Badge

2014 has been a great for classic automobiles, with many ultra-rare cars hitting the auction block, spurring massive interest and changing owners for millions of dollars. In the United States alone, the biggest market for cars cars, collectors spent no less than $1.3 billion in 2014, up from $1.2 billion in 2013.

This year also saw no less than 19 classic cars sell for more than $5 million, yet another record for the industry. Not surprising, the top 10 is dominated by Ferrari, with the nine most expensive cars wearing the Prancing Horse badge. What’s more, Ferrari also established a new world record as far as auctions go, with a 1962 250 GTO finding a new owner for $38,115,000, smashing the previous record established in 2013 by a 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196 Formula 1 car by nearly $10 million.

In all, the 20 best-selling classics of 2014 fetched no less than $212.5 million, $144.3 million of which were achieved by 14 Ferraris. The other six vehicles that sold for more than $4.9 million include two Ford GT40s, a Delahaye 135, an Aston Martin DB3S, a McLaren F1 GTR Longtail and a Jaguar D-Type. The Ford GT40 Prototype that sold for $7 million on April 12th in Houston, Texas, is the most expensive American car auctioned in 2014.

Click past the jump to learn which Ferrari models were the most expensive at auctions this year.

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Video: Chris Harris Reviews Ferrari 250 GT Tour De France

Video: Chris Harris Reviews Ferrari 250 GT Tour De France

Chris Harris has done it again. He has found the ultimate classic car to test drive that makes us drool. This time around, Harris gets some time behind the wheel of the Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France. No, this isn’t some pace car used to lead segments of the famed bicycle race. Rather, this classic racer was once a long-distance race car that tackled asphalt and dirt roads with authority in the Tour de France Automobile.

Under the hood is a 3.0-liter, 12-cylinder engine that produced 240 horsepower in its racing days, but closer to 270 horses after modern modifications were made. That isn’t much power by today’s standards, but back in the 1950s, when this car did its racing, that was a ton of power.

Also unimpressive by today’s standards is this car’s 165-mph top speed. But picture hitting this top speed on a dirt road with 1950’s tires and four-wheel drum brakes, and you can see why only a brave few could actually pilot this rig.

The blue beauty in this video is set to head to auction soon, but the current owner was kind enough to allow Harris to pilot it. And as always, he delivers to us a great review with plenty of classic 12-pot noise to satisfy the ears. Is it simply spectacular to hear that small-displacement 12-cylinder hum along.

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Christopher Ward C70 3527 GT Chronometer

Christopher Ward C70 3527 GT Chronometer

I’ve seen a lot of timepieces born from collaborations between an automaker and a watch company, but I honestly haven’t seen anything quite like this. British watchmaker Christopher Ward has created a limited-edition watch that has a piece of an actual car embedded in it. But wait, it’s not just any car we’re talking about here; this particular watch has an original piece of exterior paneling from a Ferrari 250 GTO. Let me know if any of you have seen or heard anything like this before because I surely haven’t. I also haven’t seen a unicorn in my lifetime, but that’s a story for another day.

This particular watch, though, is a thing of beauty. It’s called the C70 3527 GT and the ’3527 GT’ nomenclature is a nod to the chassis number of the seventh 250 GTO.

Christopher Ward is only releasing 100 pieces and each individual buyer will only receive one unit. Each watch will come with a price tag of $2,950, which is incredibly expensive compared to my humble, eight-year-old Casio G-Shock.

Should you be interested in ordering the C70 3527 GT Chronometer, you’re going to need to contact Christopher Ward directly to let its sales people know you’re willing to spend that much money on arguably the most unique auto-themed timepiece in the world. It’s first-come, first-served so act quickly if you want one.

Click past the jump to read more about the Christopher Ward C70 3527 GT Chronometer.

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Ferrari 250 GTO Berlinetta Sells For $38 Million At Bonhams Auction

Ferrari 250 GTO Berlinetta Sells For $38 Million At Bonhams Auction

A 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO has become the most expensive car sold at auction after changing owners for a whopping $38,115,000 at Bonhams’ Quail Lodge Auction in Carmel, California. The classic Prancing Horse surpassed the auction record set by a 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196R Formula One race car that sold for $30 million at the 2013 Goodwood Festival of Speed Auction.

Only 39 of these Ferraris were built in the 1960s, with many of them fetching millions of dollars during either public auctions or private sales. One example that was owned by Stirling Moss changed hands for $35 million in 2012, while another 250 GTO sold for $52 million in 2013. Both were sold privately.

Powered by a 3.0-liter, V-12 engine, the 250 GTO shown above — chassis and engine number 3851GT — was driven to a second-place overall finish in the 1962 Tour de France by Jo Schlesser and Henry Oreiller. More a maintained car than a restored one, the 3851GT has been active all its 54-year-long life, being raced in many classic motorsport events. It’s one of the most often raced 250 GTOs and it has been in a single family ownership for the past 49 years. This pretty much explains the huge price tag, doesn’t it?

The $38-million 250 GTO wasn’t the only Ferrari to fetch big bucks at Bonhams’ sale in California. Ten other Italian sports and race cars crossed the block for a combined total of $65.9 million. The bundle included a 1962 250 GT SWB Speciale that sold for $6.8 million, a 1953 250 Mille Miglia Berlinetta driven by Phil Hill for $7.2 million, and a 1978 312 T3 Formula One car for $2.3 million.

Click past the jump to read about the Ferrari 250 GTO

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Ferrari Expert Claims that the $64 Million Ferrari 250 GTO is a Fake

Ferrari Expert Claims that the $64 Million Ferrari 250 GTO is a Fake

Someone’s being a little sneaky with a certain 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO that one Ferrari expert has called out as a replica. You might remember that 250 GTO that popped up on Mobile.de a few weeks ago and came with a price tag of $64 million. The car received worldwide coverage because 1), it’s a Ferrari 250 GTO and 2), it costs $64 freakin’ million!

But Marcel Massini, regarded as the world’s leading Ferrari historian, is calling BS on the $64-million 250 GTO. "It’s a replica," Massini told. "I can tell you that with 100 percent certainty. I know where all of these cars are today. And this is not one of the original GTOs."

That part about knowing where all 39 250 GTOs are is apparently what separates Massini from the other Ferrari experts out there. Not only does he know where each one is, but he has photos and detailed histories of them. All 39 of them.

Massini also pointed out the car’s rather astronomical price tag as an indication that it’s fake, saying that anybody who owns a 250 GTO will use different methods to sell a car that’s expensive and incredibly rare. In short, posting it on a website isn’t one of them.

I personally have had no business dealings with Mobile.de so its hard to tell if they themselves were duped into selling a replica. The site has yet to issue any comments on Massini’s allegations, but it’s hard to go against someone who most agree is the authority on Ferrari’s history.

Updated 05/08/2014 @ 12:00 p.m.: Apparently the Ferrari expert was right, as the ad has been removed from mobile.de.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GTO.

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1962 Ferrari 250 GTO can be Yours for $64 Million

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO can be Yours for $64 Million

There are only so many superlatives you can throw in the direction of the Ferrari 250 GTO. To this day, it’s still considered as the quintessential Ferrari. More importantly, the 250 GTO is also revered as one of the greatest cars of all time. The 250 GTO is treated with such high reverence that the car usually fetches millions on the auction block. We’ve seen a 250 GTO LWB California Spider Competizione fetch $11 million. Before that, a 250 LM scooped up $14.3 million. And before we forget, a pair of 250 GTOs have been sold for $32 million and $52 million, respectively. Here’s the takeaway: if you own a Ferrari 250 GTO, you’re in possession of a car that can net you at least $30 million. There is no shortage of people willing to spend that amount, maybe even double that, to own a piece of Ferrari history. That being said, a 1962 250 GTO has found itself on Mobile.de, considered as Germany’s biggest online marketplace. It’s a legitimate site that has seen its share of million-dollar transactions so there’s little reason to suggest that this isn’t an authentic 250 GTO.

Its seller, GT Golden Tower Real Estate and Luxury Gmbh, indicates that this red 250 GTO has traveled 15,000 kilometers (9,320 miles), which means that its owner has made relatively good use of it. But the car still looks to be in great shape. One photo even shows the car’s V-12 engine to be in immaculate shape. The interior also looks polished and show quality.

Everything about this 1962 250 GTO looks to be in order. Well, almost everything. See, GT Golden Tower thinks this 250 GTO can sell for €47.6 million, which is about $64 million based on current exchange rates on 7/29/2014.

That’s a lot of money, but as history has shown, it’s not an absurd figure for a Ferrari 250 GTO.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GTO.

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Video: Petrolicious Pays Tribute to the 1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

Video: Petrolicious Pays Tribute to the 1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

There are literally a handful of cars in the history of the industry that’s revered more than the Ferrari 250 GTO. Really, you can probably count in one hand those models and we’re guessing you’re even going to have a hard time doing it. Such is the level of respect people have of this true classic. Consider how much a 250 GTO fetches in auctions these days. Last November, a variation of the 250 GTO - the 250 LM - sold for $14.3 million. But even that pales in comparison to the incredible $52 million price Connecticut-based collector Paul Pappalardo paid for a 1963 250 GTO. So yeah, unless there’s a DeLorean out there that actually flies, no car today - classic or modern - will even come close to sniffing that record purchase.

So imagine what it must have felt for Petrolicious to get its hands on a 250 GTO. In this video, Derek Hill, the son of former Formula One champion and Ferrari factory driver Phil HIll, managed to acquire a 1964 250 GTO. We can only wonder what it must have felt like to be entrusted with a car that probably has a higher value that the GDP of some countries. But if anybody understood the value of this car, it’s Hill. After all, his father actually raced this exact 250 GTO at the Daytona Continental, which the older Hill ended up winning.

You really can’t understate the rarity of this particular GTO, chassis #5571. It’s actually one of the last GTOs ever built and was also the first of the Series II bodies and it came with a 3.0-liter V-12 engine that produces 300 horsepower.

Not that we’re pining for it to hit any kind of auction in the future, but can you imagine how much it would fetch in a setting like that? It’s not just a 250 GTO; it’s a 250 GTO with a real racing history attached to it.

North of $50 million? We’d be fools not to at least consider it.

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Rare Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider To Hit The Auction Block

Rare Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider To Hit The Auction Block

Ever wondered, why the Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider has "California" in its name? Here’s why. A Ferrari dealer based out of the U.S. requested the company to make a car named after their biggest market and hence the name. The sunshine state of California has been the home of Hollywood for ages and money was never short.

Even today, the sheer number millionaires in the state is mind-boggling. That said, with the advent of the age of information and technology, a new generation of billionaires have emerged. Anyway, back to the California Spider. The 1958 Ferrari 250 GT California Spider LWB will hit the auction block soon.

Experts suggest, the car could be valued over $8 million! One reason for such a high price is the fact that back in the days, Ferrari only built 50 examples of the California Spider. Now, the Ferrari 250 GT was a thoroughbred racer on which the California was based. The "LWB" stands for "Long Wheelbase". The market for old and rare Ferraris is huge. Only this year, RM Auctions sold an equally rare Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider for 25 million dollars!

And that’s not all, an even exclusive Ferrari 250 GTO fetched no less than $50 million. A short wheelbase version of the 250 GT California Spider also found a buyer recently. He apparently shelled out $11 million for the 250 GT California Spider SWB. The LWB California that is to be auctioned by RM Auction in Arizona is the 11th chassis (out of 50) produced by Ferrari and worked upon by the legendary metal worker Scaglietti.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GT California Spider LWB

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1964 Ferrari 250 LM Fetches $14 Million at Auction

1964 Ferrari 250 LM Fetches $14 Million at Auction

If it’s a classic from Maranello that is rare and has won races in the past, you can’t expect it to come cheap. That fact that was proved once again at a car auction in New York, where a gorgeous 1964 Ferrari 250 LM, along with other more collectible items from the history of the automobile, were on sale.

Noted auction houses, Sotheby’s and RM Auctions, brought 32 trophy vehicles that fetched a total of $62.8 million in sales. Of that $62.8 million, the Ferrari 250 LM was contributed a whopping $14.3 million, more than double that of the previous 250 LM sold and a new record for the model.

The sale of the 1964 250 LM also got its name in the costliest Ferrari’s ever sold list. Ferrari never produced more than 32 examples of the 250LM.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1964 Ferrari 250 LM

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1963 Ferrari 250 GTO Hits $52 Million and Sets a New Record

1963 Ferrari 250 GTO Hits $52 Million and Sets a New Record

Last year, a Ferrari 250 sold for $32 million. This price certainly sounds like a bargain, when compared to the price paid for a 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO racecar. Numerous reports indicate that an unknown man paid $52 million to get the car. There is no official confirmation on this, but according to Bloomberg, the price was confirmed by three specialist traders.

If this sale price is accurate, this easily trumps the $34,711,200 sale of a Ferrari 250 GTO that was once driven by Stirling Moss.

The car was once owned by the Greenwich, Connecticut-based collector, Paul Pappalardo, then by a Spanish collector. Pappalardo bought the car in 1974, paid a handsome fee to restore it and after that, it saw use in many historic races, including the 2002 Le Mans Classic. After that the car was sold.

When asked about this subject, Pappalardo said he has no comment, but it’s pretty clear that the Ferrari 250 is becoming a great collection.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GTO.

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Top-Ten Best 1960s Supercars

Top-Ten Best 1960s Supercars

The swinging 60s just brings up this roasted and muddy air of sex, sweat and drugs. Enough to intoxicate even the plastic hippies among us, the 1960s is rapidly becoming the most profitable segment of the classic supercar market.

And for good reason. Simple leather is mixed with gasoline until emotions boil. This list spans such greats as the Ferrari 250GT California Spider LWB Competizione to the 365 GTB/4 Daytona. And what a long, strange trip it was between those two masterpieces.

The birth of the Porsche 911, the Aston Martin DB5, the Shelby Cobra and Ford GT40, the Maserati Ghibli Spyder and many more.

All of the cars from this era are rich in prose. Sean Connery’s name pops up repeatedly, and so does Steve McQueen and Sir Paul McCartney. These were mens’ men in a time of changing morals on a global scale.

But the coupes and ragtops these gents preferred are really fit for the ages. So throw on some Aviators and slip into your slimmest racing loafers.

Click past the jump for a sunny-Sunday donut run in the Top-Ten Best Supercars from the 1960s.

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1962 Ferrari 250 GTO can be yours for $41 millions

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO can be yours for $41 millions

Back in February a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO has been sold for an amazing £20.2 million - or about $32 million at the current exchange rates. Now one Ferrari 250 GTO Series 1 unit has been listed at Anamera.com for an even more impressive $41 million.

Ferrari produced only 39 250 GTO units between 1962 and 1964 and it is being considered to be one of the greatest Ferrari models ever built. Most of the work has been made by Chief engineer Giotto Bizzarrini and designer Sergio Scaglietti whom have spent hours in the wind tunnels and on the race tracks perfecting the body of the GTO. The result was a top speed of 174 mph.

The model is powered by a 3.0-liter Colombo V12 engine used in the Test Rossa. This was an aluminum engine with magnesium cam covers, six 38 DCN Weber carburetors, and a dry sump oil system. The engine delivers a total of 300 horsepower and sprints the car from 0 to 60 mph in just 6.1 seconds.

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1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione

1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione

The Ferrari California Spider alone is one of the most desirable Ferraris and sports cars in the world. This 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione, which belonged to the late Sherman Wolf, is an even more desirable model, as it is one of nine examples that boast an all-alloy body and a long wheelbase. That rarity is something that will drive this car to between the $7 and $9 million mark.

This sample was actually the first Ferrari that the famed collector owned, and made its way to Wolf after first being owned by George Reed. Wolf also ran this Ferrari in the first ever Colorado Grand, just adding more to its storied history.

On the mechanical side, this 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione boasts full competition specifications. It has an outside plug motor that has TR heads resting on top of it, 4-wheel disc brakes, velocity stacks, and a ribbed gearbox to help keep it cool. The engine is a 2,953 cc V-12 with three Weber carbs mounted atop it and a 9.8-to-1 compression ratio. It punches out 280 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 203 pound-feet of torque at 5,500 rpm.

The body is draped in a medium shade of red and was fully restored by Ferrari specialist, David Carte. The wheels are the factory-style wires and the headlights boast the full-racing covers to help add to the car’s aerodynamic look.

This 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione is being offered up at the Pebble Beach Auction on August 18th and 19th, 2012 by Gooding & Company. It is one of four Ferraris owned by the Wolf estate that are up for auction in Pebble Beach.

UPDATE 08/20/2012: The Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione has just set a record at Monterey for all-time high price. The classic, drop-top sports car was auctioned off for a whopping $11,275,000! Someone really wanted that car!

Updated 12/27/2013: A Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider will be put on auction by RM Auctions in Arizona on Friday, January 17, 2014. The car is expected to fetch around $7-9 millions!

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

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Hublot Ferrari 250 GTO Classic Fusion Watch

Hublot Ferrari 250 GTO Classic Fusion Watch

The 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO is, without question, the rarest and most sough-after Ferrari ever built. Hardly surprising, too, considering that only 36 models were ever built and it carried an iconic design and ahead-of-its-time mechanics.

This year, the 250 GTO is celebrating its 50th anniversary and Ferrari is preparing for a grand celebration that the car so fittingly deserves. One of the Ferrari’s partners, Hublot is lending its support with the production of the Ferrari 250 GTO Classic Fusion Watch, a time piece that pays homage to the iconic Ferrari.

Unveiled last week in an event at the home of Dom Pérignon Champagne at Abbaye de Hautvillers in France, the special edition timepiece is truly a watch for the books. In celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 250 GTO, Hublot designed the Ferrari 250 GTO Classic Fusion Watch with the finest of details, highlighted by a 45mm encasement machined out of titanium and fitted with a skeletonized Tourbillion movement. The Swiss watchmaker also added GTO references on the watch, including the customized chassis numbers from the cars and the use of barenia calfskin on the watch’s strap. Finally, a unique barrel drum was also designed in the watch, which you can see at the 12 o’clock position. This is as unique and as intricate a detail as you can expect from a timepiece brand like Hublot.

Unfortunately for timepiece enthusiasts, getting your hands on one of these watches is next to impossible...unless of course you happen to own one of the remaining 250 GTOs still in existence today.

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1964 Ferrari 250 GT Lusso Berlinetta

1964 Ferrari 250 GT Lusso Berlinetta

The Ferrari 250 GT lineup was a direct spawn of the 250 racers from the 1950s. In 1954, the first of the 250 GTs, the 250 Europa GT, came into existence, bearing a 217-horsepower V-12 engine and a long racing bloodline. The 259 GT line was neither a long-lived nor mass produced product, as it only lasted one decade and a fairly limited production number.

In 1962, Ferrari released a new version of the 250 GT, which was dubbed the 250 GT Lusso, “Lusso” meaning “Luxury.” The 250 GT/L is one of the more rare Ferraris in the world today, as only 350 models were ever built and the number of surviving models is not readily available.

If you have ever wanted to own one of these particularly rare machines, now is the time to act, as RM Auctions is offering a 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta up for sale in Monaco on May 11th and 12th, 2012. Not only is this an extremely rare model, but it was the 4th from the last one ever manufactured.

You may be wondering how well this 48-year-old Ferrari is holding up to the test of time.

Click past the jump to find out.

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GTO London commemorates 50 years of the Ferrari GTO with luxury cufflinks

GTO London commemorates 50 years of the Ferrari GTO with luxury cufflinks

The going price for a Ferrari 250 GTO, at least in the auction market, has a base of seven figures. That means that if you have plans of owning one, you need to have a pretty deep set of pockets.

But if finances are a question, you can still own something akin to a 250 GTO, except that instead of the actual classic Ferrari, you’ll be going home with a set of cufflinks.

Courtesy of GTO London, the gentleman’s accessory specialist, the Ferrari 250 GTO Barrel Ignition Cufflinks are probably the next best thing to owning an actual Ferrari 350 GTO. The cufflinks have been expertly hand-crafted and engineered to the finest detail, even featuring GTO London’s precisely-engineered signature cuff anchor mechanism.

In addition to the cufflinks, GTO London is also offering a slew of other items as part of their ‘Accensione’ collection. If cufflinks aren’t your thing, you can opt for a key fob and tie pin that has been designed to look like a Ferrari 250 GTO ignition. All these items, according to GTO London, are created from sterling silver, or, in some cases, with touches of Real Ferrari Metal.

And unlike an actual 250 GTO, owning these accessories won’t cost you a fortune. The Ignition Cufflinks retail at £245, which is north of $600 based on current exchange rates. As for the tie pin, that sells for £115 ($390) while the fob sells for £155 pounds ($390).

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Rusty Ferrari 250 GTE put on auction

Rusty Ferrari 250 GTE put on auction

Some say a Ferrari will never lose its value and we generally agree with it. But what happens when the Ferrari is all covered in rust? Well, we’re about to find out its auction value as Bonhams has put a 1961 Ferrari 250 GTE that hasn’t been driven since 1975 under the hammer. Imagine all the rust in there! In fact, the car needs a restoration job that wil probably cost £100,000 - about $150,000 at the current exchange rates. Still, Bonhams hopes to sell the car for about £60,000 - about $94,000. A bargain, no?

Once featuring a very cool silver paint, this 250 GTE has a very interesting history: in 1963 it was bought by Eva Michelson and imported from Rome to UK. Four years later she sold it to her doctor, Hector Anderson where it then passed as an inheritance to his daughter. Since then, the car has been sitting idly in a garage in Kent.

Bonhams said: "He only drove it for seven or eight years and it was last roadworthy in 1975. Because of this, it only has 49,000 miles on the clock... Now she has taken the decision to sell the car in the hope a Ferrari enthusiast will be able to appreciate its potential and bring it back to life."

So the question is: are you that Ferrari enthusiast?

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Classic Ferrari 250 GTO fetches record $32 million auction price

Classic Ferrari 250 GTO fetches record $32 million auction price

The Ferrari 250 GTO is considered one of the most revered cars in history, so much so that people with very, very deep pockets will line up and bid in the "7-0’s" just to be able to own one.

Recently, one of only 39 models of the iconic Ferrari sports car was put up for auction. Lo and behold, the bids came at a feverish rate before the vehicle was scooped up for a reported £20.2 million - that’s about $32 million based on current exchange rates.

You read that right, folks: $32 million for a Ferrari 250 GTO.

The classic sports car was reportedly sold by British businessman Jon Hunt, the same man who bought the car a few years ago for £15.7 million. Four years after the purchase, Hunt already has an extra £4.5 million in profit to his name.

As far as the car itself, the $32-million 250 GTO carries chassis number ’5095’ and comes with a 3.0-liter V12 engine that produces 300 horsepower while carrying a 0-60 mph time of 6.1 seconds and a top speed of 174 mph.

Despite the astronomical price tag, the 250 GTO’s auction price is a little short of the world record bid for a classic car, which the 1936 Bugatti 57SC Atlantic owns after receiving a bid of somewhere around $40 million two years ago.

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Sergio Scaglietti passes away at 91

Sergio Scaglietti passes away at 91

It has been confirmed that late last night, the world lost a true genius in the art of car design. Sergio Scaglietti, the man behind the designs of the 1957 250 California Spider, 1958 250 Testa Rossa, and 1962 250 GTO, among others, has passed away. He was 91 years old.

Sergio Scaglietti doesn’t need too much of an introduction in the eyes of Ferrari lovers. He started his work in 1951 when he opened Carrozzeria Scaglietti - an Italian automobile design and coachbuilding company. The coachbuilder was located just across the road from Ferrari in Maranello, where the great Enzo Ferrari took notice of the talented designer. Scaglietti was one of the few designers that gained Enzo Ferrari’s trust and respect both through his bodywork and design skills. Scaglietti of course started designing cars for Ferrari, and was even honored with a few cars named after him, such as the 612 Scaglietti and 456M GT Scaglietti.

"He was one of my father’s best friends," said Piero Ferrari. "He was next to me with Marco Piccinini also the day my father died and stayed with me the whole night until the funeral. I loved him and he was a very important part of my life. The world is emptier without Sergio."

After a lifetime of dedication to the designing of vehicles, Sergio Scaglietti passed away at his home in Modena. The world has undoubtedly lost an automotive icon. We have great respect for his work and send our condolences to his family.

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1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa Prototype

1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa Prototype

Ferrari is not a company that often reuses names, or revives dead nameplates. This is partly because so many of the names of the cars are alphanumeric, but also because Ferrari wants to present each car as new and advanced, and that’s a lot harder to do when you’re recycling names. So when a name does get recycled, it has to be a pretty special one. So even though today the name Testarossa is most closely associated with Ferrari’s flat-12-powered grand tourer from the ’80s and early ’90s, but the name actually goes all of the way back to 1957, with one of the greatest race cars in Ferrari history.

It actually has to be said that the names aren’t actually identical. The racer was named “Testa Rossa” (two words) and the more recent car was the “Testarossa” (one word). This is important because the meaning is slightly different. The words “testa rossa” mean “red head,” and the original 250 TR got the name from its red valve covers. But just as “redhead” as one word in English means a woman with red hair, the Italian name was given to the ’80s car both as a tribute and also with an implied wink.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa Prototype.

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24-karat Ferrari 250 GTO sculpture to be unveiled at Pebble Beach

24-karat Ferrari 250 GTO sculpture to be unveiled at Pebble Beach

By now, you’re probably familiar with the works of Swiss artist Dante. If you recall, he’s the guy that makes those obscenely expensive car sculptures that retail for about the same price as high-performance sports cars. One of his previous works - a wire sculpture of the Aston Martin DB5 - has already graced our pages before, which came with a price of £88,000, about $144,000 based on current exchange rates.

Now, the artist is back with his new creation and the third piece of his Iconic Sports Cars: a 24-karat Ferrari 250 GTO sculpture that is scheduled to be revealed in Pebble Beach, California next month.

According to Dante, these sculptures are "my tribute to the men who made the original cars: they were artists."

There’s no telling how much this 24-karat 250 GTO is going to cost, but we expect it to retail for around the same price the aforementioned DB5 and the other sculpture, one featuring the Mercedes 300 SL Gullwing, commanded when they hit the market.

The 24-karat Ferrari 250 GTO will be limited to only ten pieces and will be unveiled at the same time that Pebble Beach will be celebrating the real deal with an exhibit of the world’s remaining 250 GTOs.

"One of the most important reasons for my coming to Pebble Beach is the celebration of the Ferrari 250 GTO and the number of original cars being shown," said Dante. "It is my favorite car of all time.”

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Ferrari 250 GTO Evocazione up for sale at Brooklands Auction

Ferrari 250 GTO Evocazione up for sale at Brooklands Auction

Chances are, you will never fly to the moon or become a billionaire. An even more unlikely scenario is to see an original Ferrari 250 GTO Evocazione up for sale. To say the occurrence has a once in a blue moon chance is a bit of an understatement. That being said, get your checkbooks out and get ready to write down a number well into the 8-figures - but not yet.

The car up for sale is not a real 250 GTO Evocazione. Although the car is a real Ferrari, it started its life as a much more modest 330 GT. The owner then decided to mod the car to resemble a 250 GTO. And not just any GTO, the only right hand drive 4-liter V-12 model Ferrari made to compete at Le Mans.

The fact of the matter is that, although you are not getting a real 250 GTO, the replica is sure to make you just as happy as the real thing. Once in a lifetime will you ever see a real 250 GTO Evocazione up for sale, so for an astronomically lower price, you have the opportunity to own a piece of racing history.

The Ferrari 250 GTO Evocazione replica is expected to fetch $377,000 - a far cry from the $18 million of the original - on September 25th at the Historics at Brooklands in England.

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1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione for auction

1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione for auction

Gooding & Company has announced that a 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione will be available for auction at Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in August. The car is considered to be the most significant LWB California Spider ever built, so expect to see a very high price attached to this vehicle.

The California Spyder features a 508 D chassis, covered headlights, and the most powerful engine still fitted to a California Spider, a Tipo 168. These highlights are some of the main reasons this car has done so well in a number of events. It finished 5th overall at Sebring 12 Hours and has done well in the Bahamas Speed Week, many times with famous drivers including George Reed and Alan Connell behind the wheel.

The same auction will also feature a 1955 Maserati A6G/54 Berlinetta by Zagato, a 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta SEFAC Hot Rod, and a 1971 Lamborghini Miura S that is being estimated at more than $600K. There will also be an auction by Mecum featuring a 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Tour de France.

Press release after the jump.

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1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Tour de France for auction

1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Tour de France for auction

In 1959 Ferrari unveiled a one-off 250 GT Tour de France specially designed for the 24 Hours of Le Mans. This car took first in its class and third place overall at Le Mans and won the 1000km Nurburgring race as well. Since then the car has only been owned by a few collectors. Unbelievably, this particular car will now be going up for auction by Mecum in Monterey, California. This auction will take place during the Pebble Beach concours weekend on August 13, 2010.

The 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Tour de France, serial number 1321, is painted in the original red and orange livery with original racing number. It was built on a 2600 mm wheelbase and powered by a 3-liter version of the Colombo ’short-block’ V12 engine that delivered 240 hp. This appearance will be its first in over twenty years since its outing in Road America in the early ’90s.

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Ferrari 250 GTO sold for an amazing $25 million

Ferrari 250 GTO sold for an amazing $25 million

What crisis? People say there is a monetary crisis all over the world, but if you take a look at the recent auctions made in the automotive industry, you’d be scratching your head about what the heck everyone was talking about. Just recently a 1936 Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantic was sold for an amazing $30-$40 million, bringing it to the top of the list of the most expensive cars sold. Today we bring another piece of news like the Bugatti story: a 1963 Ferrari 20 GTO was sold by RM Auctions for an amazing $25 million. Not the most expensive car sold, but damn near close to it.

That’s not such a big surprise considering the 250 GTO is a very exclusive car. It was built between 1962 and 1964 and only 39 units were produced. It was powered by a V12 engine delivering an impressive 302 bhp at 7500 rpm. The 250 GTO is capable of making the 0 to 60 mph sprint in 5.4 seconds and can hit a top speed of 174 mph.

Max Girado – R.M.’s Euro M.D. – said: "The exclusivity of Ferrari’s 250 GTO cannot be understated. As they rarely come to market, new owners become part of a very exclusive ‘club’ and are welcomed with open arms at literally any of the world’s great concours events, races, and rallies. We are pleased to have been able to unite this exceptional car with a new and immensely enthusiastic owner. It’s fantastic that this car will now be used in earnest on the classic car scene around Europe."

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Video: Make sure your Ferrari 250 GTO is as clean as it can be

Video: Make sure your Ferrari 250 GTO is as clean as it can be

For all intents and purposes, a Ferrari 250 GTO deserves to be cleaned as often as a $10 million-dollar car should be cleaned, which is to say, all the time.

After all, you wouldn’t want any dirt, or grime, or any foreign substance to stick on your car, right?

This man knows all too well about that. Unfortunately, the 250 GTO that he’s ‘supposedly cleaning’ is far from his.

Check it out and spend the next minute or two laughing to your hearts content.

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1963 Ferrari 250 GTO up for sale

1963 Ferrari 250 GTO up for sale

One of the rarest and most desirable Ferraris in the world, the 1963 250 GTO, is currently up for grabs from the folks at RM Auctions. The 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO is one of only 39 in the world and is considered to be one of the most beautiful cars ever built by Ferrari, aside from being tremendously successful in competition, securing multiple World Championships for the Maranello based sports car builder.

According to Max Girardo, Managing Director of RM Europe, "The Ferrari GTO is unquestionably one of the most iconic and coveted cars in the world...This is truly a rare occasion for collectors to acquire such an important piece of automotive history and we are pleased to be chosen by [chassis number] 4675 GT’s current custodian to represent it on the open market." While the GTO originaly sold for $18,000 when new, an example of Ferrari’s first super has been valued at closer to $30 Million, however RM hasn’t given any leads as to what the asking price will be for this 250 GTO.

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1962 - 1964 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta lusso

1962 - 1964 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta lusso

In 1962, at the Paris Motor Show, Ferrari unveiled the final model in the 250 GT series. Called 250 GT Berlinetta lusso, the new model has been produced between 1962 and 1964 with 350 units being produced. The car replaced the 250 GT Coupe, were designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti in Modena. Actor Steve McQueen is one of the famous car’s owners.

The 250 GT Berlinetta lusso was built on the short wheelbase of the earlier 250 GTs, but with a revised chassis and the engine moved slightly further forward providing additional interior room for the occupants.

A hit already among the 250 models, the single overhead camshaft, 60° V12 was once again used. For the 250 GT Berlinetta lusso the engine had a bore and stroke of 73mm x 58.8mm and delivered 250bhp at 7500rpm with a compression of 9.2:1. The engine was coupled with a 4-speed + reverse all-synchromesh gearbox, with final drive through a propeller shaft to the rigid rear axle, for which two alternative ratios were available.

The 0 to 60 mph sprint was made in less than 7 seconds, while top speed went up to 150 mph.

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1959 - 1962 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta passo corto

1959 - 1962 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta passo corto

In 1959 at the Paris Salon, Ferrari unveiled the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta - or "passo corto". It was designed by Pininfarina and built at the Scaglietti works in Modena. Built on a 2400mm chassis, the 250 GT Berlinetta passo corto was a natural continuation of the Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France.

This was the first Ferrari production road car to be fitted with disc brakes as standard and, unlike the preceding 250 GT Berlinetta series, was available in either left- or right-hand drive. It was also available in competition specification, with an aluminium body, lightweight interior trim, and the engine in a higher state of tune – or in ‘Lusso’ (luxury) road trim, when it was normally fitted with a steel body with aluminium opening panels.

Under the hood Ferrari placed a further development of the original Colombo-designed single overhead camshaft per bank V12 engine, with a capacity of 2953 cc, via a bore and stroke of 73 x 58.8 mm. The engine was delivering between 220 to 280 bhp, dependent upon specification. All versions were featuring four-speed transmission.

Continued after the jump.

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1957 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet

1957 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet

In 1957 at the Geneva Motor Show, Ferrari unveiled the 250 GT Cabriolet - a two-seater spider built for the more refined clientele. After the first 40 cars had been produced, a second series was created. To differentiate it from the more sporting 250 GT Spider California, the Cabriolet’s styling was made more sober, boot space was increased and it was made more comfortable inside. Production continued until 1962, and around 200 cars were built in all, with no two cars were completely identical.

Of course is not the first spider-bodied Ferrari, but until it cabriolets featuring proper folding soft tops had only been produced in relatively small numbers. So, in 1956 when Carrozzeria Boano exhibited a 250 GT Cabriolet, chassis 0461GT, it was the beginning of a new era. This was in fact the first 250 GT Cabriolet that lead to the first series of Pininfarina-designed cabriolets produced during 1957 and 1958.

Like most of the previous models, the 250 GT Cabriolet was built on a 2600 mm wheelbase and they were powered by a 3-litre version of the Colombo ’short-block’ V12 engine that delivered 240 hp.

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1956 - 1959 Ferrari 250GT Berlinetta

1956 - 1959 Ferrari 250GT Berlinetta

While Ferrari has a big history in building "berlinetta" model, the 250GT is the first one to be built. This car was perfect for both track and racing, and quickly after their unveiling they have become a the racer of choice amongst top drivers. The 250GT Berlinetta made its first appearance at Nassau in 1956. Only one year after, at the 1957 Tour de France, Ferrari took the top three places and proved the versatility of the car.

The "Tour de France" series of cars were the competition orientated berlinetta versions of the 250 GT road cars, designed for racing in the GT category. The car was designed by PininFarina and constructed in aluminum by Scaglietti.

The Ferrari 250GT Berlinetta was powered by the original Colombo-designed V12 engine now tuned by Ferrari to produce 240-280 horsepower using three downdraft Weber carburetors.

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1953 Ferrari 250 Europa and Europa GT

1953 Ferrari 250 Europa and Europa GT

In 1953 at the Paris Salon, Ferrari unveiled their first attempt in building a series production Grand Touring car. The new model called 250 Europa was offered in two versions of the model: the first 20 units were simply called 250 Europe, while the other 44 were being called 250 GT Europa. The difference between the two version was firstly made by the wheelbase: 2800mm for Europa and 2600mm for Europa GT; and secondly by the engine: first one was using a 3-liter Lampredi V12 engine and the second one a 3-liter Colombo V12 engine.

The GT version was revealed in 1954 at the Paris Salon, initially using the same 250 Europa name, but the GT suffix was soon added, to help differentiate it from its predecessor, and then it became known simply as the 250 GT. The overall shape of the majority of the series was virtually identical to that of the 250 Europa Pininfarina three window coupé that preceded it. In fact, unless you had a keen eye for dimensions, you would need a tape measure to tell them apart, the main difference being in the distance between the front wheel arch and the A-pillar.

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Video: Ferrari 250 TR crashes at Laguna Seca

Video: Ferrari 250 TR crashes at Laguna Seca

When we showed you the $8 million 1958 Ferrari 250 TR hit the tire wall at Laguna Seca over the weekend, all our evidences were constricted to photographs. But now, thanks to videos captured by those who were at the race, we now have video evidence of exactly what happened to David Love’s obscenely expensive ride.

We’ve seen a lot of cars that crash in races over the years but not to the extent of this one. And it’s not because of the damage either, which if you look at the photos we showed, isn’t all that much – a few detailing tweaks here and there and banging sheet metals should do the trick. This car crash is significant because, well, the car that got introduced into the tire wall is one of the most expensive cars in the history of the world. One even got sold a few months ago for a cool $12 million!

While the video does give chills down our spines, we’re still compelled to show this to you guys. After all, how often do you see a car that can be sold for about four Bugatti Veyrons skirt the gravel and crash into a tire wall?

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Ferrari 250 TR crashes into tire wall at Laguna Seca

Ferrari 250 TR crashes into tire wall at Laguna Seca

Our friends at Autoblog were fortunate – or unfortunate, depending on how you can stomach a multi-million dollar car getting gslammed in a tire wall– to capture a staggeringly expensive Ferrari 250 TR run a few laps at the Laguna Seca Speedway.

For those who don’t have any idea just how expensive a Ferrari 250 TR really is, consider that just a few months ago, one such model was sold at an auction for over $12 million dollars, making it the most expensive car in history. So you’d expect that the owner of this particular 250 TR would be extra careful running it around Laguna Seca’s notorious track, maybe take it out for a leisurely cruise in front of gawking spectators.

Apparently, the owner had other ideas in mind. Whether or not he was just showing off his car or he completely lost his mind, the tore up the track and ended up ramming his $8 million dollar ride into a tire wall. We’re beyond speechless.

Continued after the jump.

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2008 Ferrari F250 Concept Design by Idries Omar

2008 Ferrari F250 Concept Design by Idries Omar

Idries Omar wanted to create a simple, fast, aerodynamic and beautiful car, that combines styling queues from Ferrari old and news. And he did! With the Ferrari F250 (250 comes from the legendary 250 GTO).

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1962 - 1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

1962 - 1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

The Ferrari 250 GTO was a sports car and auto racing car made by Ferrari in the early 1960s. It is widely considered to be the quintessential Ferrari model, and one of the greatest sports cars - indeed, one of the greatest automobiles - of all time.

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