Cars Ferrari Ferrari 275

1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS

1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS
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In terms of desirability, not much on four wheels can top the Ferrari 250 GT California Spider SWB. So when it came time forFerrari to build a follow up, it had its work cut out for it. The car that resulted was the 275 GTS, a convertible for the American market, despite the word “California” being left out of the name. And in pretty typical Ferrari fashion for the day, the GTS is a different vehicle from anything else with a 275 name, with differences going beyond the fact that the roof comes down.

The 275 GTS is based on the 275 GTB, which is about as close to standard as Ferrari nomenclature gets. But not only do the cars appear to be completely different models, they were built for different purposes. The GTB is a sports car, and so was the 275 GTB/4 that followed it, but the GTS was treated more as a grand tourer. And like a strangely large number of Ferrari convertibles from the era, it was also treated almost as more of a limited production special edition than a full-on production model. Odd when you consider how popular roofless Ferraris would turn out to be later.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 275 GTS.

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1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS

1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS

In terms of desirability, not much on four wheels can top the Ferrari 250 GT California Spider SWB. So when it came time forFerrari to build a follow up, it had its work cut out for it. The car that resulted was the 275 GTS, a convertible for the American market, despite the word “California” being left out of the name. And in pretty typical Ferrari fashion for the day, the GTS is a different vehicle from anything else with a 275 name, with differences going beyond the fact that the roof comes down.

The 275 GTS is based on the 275 GTB, which is about as close to standard as Ferrari nomenclature gets. But not only do the cars appear to be completely different models, they were built for different purposes. The GTB is a sports car, and so was the 275 GTB/4 that followed it, but the GTS was treated more as a grand tourer. And like a strangely large number of Ferrari convertibles from the era, it was also treated almost as more of a limited production special edition than a full-on production model. Odd when you consider how popular roofless Ferraris would turn out to be later.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 275 GTS.

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1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB

1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB

Ferrari’s history of dual-purpose sports-racers was well underway by the time the 275 GTB debuted in 1964. This car’s significance went beyond its fully independent suspension and rear transaxle, both firsts for Ferrari, however. The 275 GTB broke ground by adapting racing technology to a road car more seamlessly than before. The Pininfarina-designed 275 GTB was a perfectly domesticated gran turismo, rather than a racer with extra seats and a radio installed. The 275 GTB’s blend of on-track capability and creature comforts helped to light the path for many Ferraris to come.

Following on the heels of the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB faced significant challenges in Ferrari’s most important arena: the track. The Shelby Cobra presented a persistent and significant challenge, and the diminutive Porsche 904 was also a threat. Ferrari needed to match these cars on the track without compromising the 275 GTB’s road manners, which proved to be no small feat.

Most critics would argue that it succeeded. The replacement for the 250 series has become one of the most iconic (and valuable) Ferraris as the years have gone by. The V12-powered 275 GTB offered exotic styling and race-proven performance, and was an icon as much for its owners as it was for its historical significance and performance. Contemporary 275 GTB owners included Steve McQueen, James Coburn, Eric Clapton, Clint Eastwood and Miles Davis.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 275 GTB.

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Two Multi-Million $ Ferraris Will Be Auctioned For Charity

Two Multi-Million $ Ferraris Will Be Auctioned For Charity

Old Ferraris tend to bring boatloads of money at auction, as do cars whose auction proceeds go to charity. Combine the two and watch money fly around the room like a class-five tornado inside Fort Knox.

That’s what’s happening this October, when not one, but two classic Ferraris will cross the auction block at the H&H Classics event at the Imperial War Museum in England. Both the 1960 250 GT SWB and 1967 275 GTB/4 are expected to earn millions, with all proceeds going towards a new boat for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, a non-profit lifesaving organization that operates in the waters around the United Kingdom.

The Ferraris were left as a legacy donation to the RNLI by businessman and car collector Richard Colton (described by his friends as a quiet but friendly fellow, who always seemed a bit nervous on boats), and will fund construction of a new lifeboat to be named the Richard and Caroline Colton, after him and his late wife.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Driving Steve McQueen's Ferrari 275 GTB/4: Video

Driving Steve McQueen’s Ferrari 275 GTB/4: Video

Fetching over $10 million in 2014, the red 275 GTB above is no "ordinary" rare Ferrari (one of only 280 units made), since it belonged to none other than the "king of cool," Steve McQueen. Apparently, the car was owned by him during the period he was filming Bullit in San Francisco, the movie for which he also did most of the stunt driving. The folks at The Aficionauto were tasked by RM Auctions with shooting a video of the rare 275 GTB in 2014, and the footage above was the original opening scene for the auctioned car.

Sadly, it was turned down by RM Auctions and didn’t make the final cut, but The Aficionauto kept the video and recently uploaded it for your enjoyment. There is little music, most of the sounds coming from the 3.3-liter V-12 as it purrs along one of the most scenic roads in the U.S. — the famed Mullholand Drive.

The car was restored from the ground up by Ferrari Classiche in Italy, after one of its previous owners had chopped off the roof and painted it yellow for some unknown reason. Its current condition is obviously top notch, which is one of the reasons it’s worth so much.

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Ferrari 275 GTB Competizione Auctioned for $9.4M

Ferrari 275 GTB Competizione Auctioned for $9.4M

Since the mid-2000s, it seems that classic Ferraris have slowly but surely started to polarize pretty much every car auction, with certain examples being sold for seven or even eight figures on a regular basis. Some of the most notorious are V-12 models in either road or racing guises, with the latest example being a pristine 275 GTB (Grand Turismo Berlinetta) Competizione. The model recently exchanged owners at a Bonhams auction in Scottsdale for no less than $9,405,000, or about the same as a nice ocean-view property in Malibu.

This is no "ordinary" Ferrari 275 GTB though, as the Scaglietti-bodied racing car won the GT class at the 1967 Le Mans 24 Hours, after which it also achieved victories at the 1969 Spa-Francorchamps 1000 Km and the 1969 Imola 500 Km with the Swiss Scuderia Filipinetti team. Powered by a Colombo-designed V-12 with a displacement of 3.3 liters that was paired with a five-speed manual transmission, the 275 actually introduced Ferrari to the transaxle principle, where the gearbox and the rear axle are integrated into a single unit for better weight distribution.

The auctioned 275 GTB/C was designed for racing from the get go, with just about every part on the body and its drivetrain having been modified and improved for better track performance. Even the V-12 engine was positioned lower and further back into the body, while the car’s body panels were made from very slim aluminum reinforced with fiberglass at the rear section. This resulted in a car that was over 300 pounds lighter than the 275 GTB road car.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 GTB Competizione.

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Of the 20 Most Expensive Cars Sold at Auction in 2014, 14 Wore a Ferrari Badge

Of the 20 Most Expensive Cars Sold at Auction in 2014, 14 Wore a Ferrari Badge

2014 has been a great for classic automobiles, with many ultra-rare cars hitting the auction block, spurring massive interest and changing owners for millions of dollars. In the United States alone, the biggest market for cars cars, collectors spent no less than $1.3 billion in 2014, up from $1.2 billion in 2013.

This year also saw no less than 19 classic cars sell for more than $5 million, yet another record for the industry. Not surprising, the top 10 is dominated by Ferrari, with the nine most expensive cars wearing the Prancing Horse badge. What’s more, Ferrari also established a new world record as far as auctions go, with a 1962 250 GTO finding a new owner for $38,115,000, smashing the previous record established in 2013 by a 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196 Formula 1 car by nearly $10 million.

In all, the 20 best-selling classics of 2014 fetched no less than $212.5 million, $144.3 million of which were achieved by 14 Ferraris. The other six vehicles that sold for more than $4.9 million include two Ford GT40s, a Delahaye 135, an Aston Martin DB3S, a McLaren F1 GTR Longtail and a Jaguar D-Type. The Ford GT40 Prototype that sold for $7 million on April 12th in Houston, Texas, is the most expensive American car auctioned in 2014.

Click past the jump to learn which Ferrari models were the most expensive at auctions this year.

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1966 - 1967 Ferrari 275 Gran Turismo Berlinetta Competizione Scaglietti

1966 - 1967 Ferrari 275 Gran Turismo Berlinetta Competizione Scaglietti

It’s hard to fill a pair of shoes owned by the Ferrari 250, arguably the most iconic Ferrari in history. The Ferrari 275 was given that task, and for the most part, it had the kind of success as a road car and a race car that the 250 would be proud of. Produced from 1964 to 1968, the 275 GTB was the first iteration to be released. It was also the first Ferrari to feature a four wheel independent suspension and a five-speed transaxle that helped the car improve its weight distribution.

Italian design house Pininfarina is largely credited as the design driving force behind the Ferrari 275, even though rival Scaglietti is credited as the hands behind the construction of the legendary grand tourer. The 275 also benefited from a 3.3-liter V-12 engine that produced between 280 to 300 horsepower. While the engine went through numerous updates during its time, the 275 pretty much relied on this one block during its life.

The 275 also had different iterations, including the aforementioned 275 GTB, as well as the GTB/C, the GTS, and later on, the Scaglietti-penned GTB/4 that became the first Ferrari to be offered without wire wheels. The GTB/4 was also different because its 3.3-liter V-12 engine came with a four-cam engine instead of the two-cam configuration of its predecessors, hence the “4” identifier on the car’s name.

Separately, a Ferrari 275 GTB/4 NART Spyder was also produced, albeit in vastly limited quantities and exclusively to American dealer Luigi Chinetti. Only 10 units of the 275 GTB/4 NART were built and its limited number made this particular model one of the most valuable Ferraris in history.

In fact, a 275 GTB/4 NART (chassis #10709) was sold for $27.5 million at the RM Auctions in Monterey on August 2013, making it one of the most expensive production cars ever sold.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 Gran Turismo Berlinetta Competizione Scaglietti.

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Ferrari 275 GTB Competizione Will Be Auctioned At Scottsdale: Video

Ferrari 275 GTB Competizione Will Be Auctioned At Scottsdale: Video

As the winner of three consecutive FIA GT championships between 1962 and 1964, and what is now the undisputed most valuable car in the world, the Ferrari 250 GTO was a tough act to follow, but its successor, the 275 GTB was arguably every bit as successful. Now, a stunning 275 GTB with a competition pedigree to match will be going under the hammer on January 15th at the Bonhams auction in Scottsdale, Arizona.

This thing is no show pony. It’s seen some serious on-track action, which makes it all the more desirable. It first competed at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1967 when it was entered by team owner Georges Filipinetti and driven by Rico Steinmann and Dieter Spörry. It won the GT class its first time out, and also entered the race in 1968 and 1969. Jacques Rey and Edgar Berney drove it to victory in the GT class in the Spa-Francorchamps 1000 Km and the Imola 500 Km in 1969.

It’s the 11th of only 12 race specific 275 GTBs of its kind, and it features a stiffer chassis than the road-going 275 GTB, thinner alloy body panels to save weight and quick-access exterior fuel and oil caps. The 3.3-liter V-12 (each cylinder displaces 275cc) produced around 300 horsepower in road-going trim, but as you would expect, this one has been warmed over a good bit. No power figure is provided, but 350 horsepower seems plausible. The engine is also placed lower and further back in the engine bay to improve weight distribution.

The 275 GTB might not be quite as pretty as the 250 GTO, but it’s certainly no cave troll. With its period-correct race livery and fog lamps, this one appears exactly as you would picture it in 1967. It features a long hood section and sits low with a race-ready stance.

After it was retired from full-time competition, it spent the 1970s and 1980s in an American collection before it was shipped back to Carrozzeria Brandoli in Italy for a full bodywork restoration. Since then it’s made the rounds at various concours events and raced in the Le Mans Classique and Silverstone Classic.

A road-going 275 GTB sold for over $10 million in August of 2014, so, given this one’s history, it’s a safe bet it will sell for considerably more.

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1965 Ferrari 275 GTB Auctioned For $2.1 Million

1965 Ferrari 275 GTB Auctioned For $2.1 Million

2014 was a great year for Ferrari. The LaFerrari hybrid supercar started hitting the streets and tracks the world over, the 458 Speciale Aperta completed the 458 lineup, while the F60 America turned out to be the most beautiful F12berlinetta ever created. 2014 was equally exceptional for classic Ferraris, with a 250 GTO becoming the most expensive car sold at auction after changing owners for $38 million. While it may take a few years for that record to be broken, yet another classic Prancing Horse is making headlines by becoming one of the many to fetch at least $2 million at auctions. The model in question is a 1965 275 GTB that sold for $2.1 million.

This specific unit is part of a series of sports cars built between 1964 and 1968 as a replacement for the iconic GTO. Its short nose configuration and the fact that it has a known history since new is what makes it even more special. Finished in a Rosso Corsa exterior and equipped with a two-tone tan leather interior, the 275 GTB was restored to original specifications in 1999. Under its long hood lurks the iconic 3.3-liter V-12 engine that gave Ferrari numerous victories throughout the 1960s. It’s also eligible to compete in 1960-1965 FIA Classification races although not many owners opt to take their prized Ferrari out on the track.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1965 Ferrari 275 GTB.

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Video: Why Steve McQueen Loved His 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4

Video: Why Steve McQueen Loved His 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4

Many consider the 275 to be one the greatest Ferraris of all time. With a V-12 motor and four-wheel independent suspension, it was a technological powerhouse of the 60s. It’s also an extremely rare car, with just 330 examples ever built. Plus, there’s the way it looks, which is just, well, look at it! And to make it even more special, the previous owner of this particular 275 was none other than Steve McQueen.

When it comes to Hollywood gearhead heroes, it’s hard to top the legendary “King of Cool." The actor is known for his roles in a handful of the best petrol-powered movies in the history of cinema, including Bullitt, Le Mans, and The Great Escape. If a film’s cast includes the name “McQueen," there’s a very good chance you’ll be treated to some epic old-school motoring and chase scenes.

Simply put, the man loved going fast. In addition to his acting career, McQueen was a serious racer, often piloting the stunt cars and motorcycles you see in his films, despite the misgivings of nervous studios. McQueen participated in several off-road and touring-car races, often placing quite well, if not winning outright. He even briefly considered a professional racing career, despite his obvious talent on the silver screen.

Any car owned by an individual with the kind of interests and skills that McQueen possessed is clearly going to be special. Check out this video to see for yourself. And, if you haven’t watched one of the movies listed above, you owe it to yourself as one of the motor-minded to do so as soon as the video is done. Trust me, you won’t regret it.

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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

Introduced in 1953, the Ferrari 250 quickly became the company’s most successful vehicle lineup. It included everything from road-legal grand tourers to the 250 Testa Rossa and 250 LM race cars. More importantly, the range spawned the iconic 250 GTO, currently the most expensive Ferrari ever auctioned (as of August 20, 2014). The 250 line came to an end in 1964, when it was replaced by two distinct families, the 275 and 330. While the 275 GTB/C stepped in to substitute the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB/4 took center stage as Ferrari’s new flagship model.

Introduced at the 1966 Paris Motor Show, the GTB/4 quickly became popular with sports car enthusiasts and celebrities, especially in the United States. Even Hollywood actor and motoring icon Steven McQueen ordered one of the V-12-powered grand tourers, receiving it on the set of the "Bullitt" movie. McQueens example became the most expensive GTB/4 ever auctioned in 2014, when it crossed the block for $10 million. Because of this huge auction sum, we decided to have a closer look at this enticing, berlinetta-bodied Ferrari.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

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1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti

1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti

In 1962, Ferrari made a huge leap forward by releasing the 250 GTO; a GT car produced for homologation into FIA’s Group 3 Grand Touring Car class. The 250 GTO went on to win the over 2.0-liter class of the International Championship for GT Manufacturers for three straight years from 1962 through 1964, becoming one of the last front-engined racers to remain competitive at the top level of sports car racing. As the two-seater berlinetta retired, Ferrari built the 275 GTB/C Speciale, a lighter sports car based on the already-iconic 250 GTO.

Designed by Sergio Scaglietti, the same man that penned the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB/C got a 3.3-liter, V-12 engine under its hood, as opposed to the 3.0-liter plant fitted in its predecessor. Output was increased to 320 horsepower, which, coupled with the lowered weight, promised to deliver outstanding performance on the track. Unfortunately, Ferrari failed to homologate the 275 for the GT class, as the car submitted was considerably lighter than the dry weight stated for the road-going version.

Ferrari and FIA would reach a compromise by June 1965, enabling only one of the three 275 GTB/Cs built to compete for the remainder of the season. Although its career didn’t span for more than a few months, the Speciale proved its potency at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, where it finished third and scored the best finish by a front-engined car. Its record still stands to this day. Granted, the 275 GTB/C is not as successful as the 250 GTO or the 250 LM, however, its limited production run and bespoke character places it among the most desirable Ferrari race cars ever built.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti.

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Steve McQueen's 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 will be Auctioned in Monterey

Steve McQueen’s 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 will be Auctioned in Monterey

If you ever wanted to own a Ferrari 275, your chance is coming up. RM Auctions has been entrusted with the sale of this special Fezza, and it will hit the block in Monterey this August. Just make sure to bring your big boy wallet; this one wont go cheap.

Not only, is this a pristine example of a 275 GTB/4, it was also owned and customized by Steve McQueen. The car was ordered by McQueen in 1967 and was delivered to him in the middle of filming "Bullit."

While the car originally arrived wearing gold paint, McQueen quickly had it painted red. The wire wheels are also not standard. They came off a different 275 that McQueen had wrecked.

After a few years of ownership, the car was sold to Guy Williams. Over the years it passed through many hands, but the latest owner had the car fully restored. Don’t be worried about the quality of that restoration, as the car has been on display at the Ferrari Museum in Italy ever since the refurb.

This could be the perfect addition to any Ferrari collection, but you will need to pay for the privilege. Sales estimates are as high as $9 million.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 GTB/4.

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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider

The record-shattering $27 million dollar auction price of the ultra-rare 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S NART Spider is making waves through the entire classic car scene.

Never before has such a late-model Ferrari earned such totals - which are typically the preserve of the 250 series from pre-1964.

What makes this gorgeous Ferrari so much more valuable than the thousands of other classic Ferrari’s seeking new homes? How did the price of this single model nearly double the $14 million dollar average price - excluding this giant total - when any of these 10 cherished models have changed hands in the past?

Part of what makes this NART Spider so valuable is the car’s unique blend of the gorgeous late-1950s Ferrari styling and advanced mechancials. The GTB/4S upgrades dramatically increased the performance and handling of this V-12 supercar. Almost the entire Maranello racing technology suite was applied to the NART Spider - allowing it to be a posh cruiser that was also capable of serious speed on a racetrack.

The V-12’s quad overhead camshafts were a first on a road car, while the rear-mounted transaxle, limited-slip diff and independent rear suspension were all huge advancements that were offered first in the NART Spider.

Ferrari never looked back from all the new technology introduced on the NART Spider. At the same time, the NART is especially sentimental because Ferrari would not make make such an emotionally-styled road car again for decades. The 365 GTB/4 Daytona was 1967’s new hot style and Ferrari followed the money trail by ending 275 production.

Little did they know, the layers of exclusivity and special editions that helped create this this NART Spider would make it the most valuable road car ever sold. Ever.

Click past the jump for the full review of this timeless classic Ferrari, with details on the technology and style of this model during its 10-unit production run in 1967.

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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S NART Spider's $27 Million Price Breaks Ferrari's Record

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S NART Spider’s $27 Million Price Breaks Ferrari’s Record

To go along with the 2013 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance were a few auctions that typically have 10 to 12 million-dollar cars on hand each and every year. This year was no exception, as RM Auction’s Monterey auction had a total of 15 million dollar hammer values, but that’s not the most imressive number of the weekend.

The most impressive of the million-dollar club this year was the price tag that the 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S N.A.R.T Spider. This 1-of-10 model went for an astounding $27.5 million once the hammer fell on it, making it the second-most valuable car ever sold at auction and the most valuable Ferrari ever sold at auction by a long shot.

Reports point toward the car heading to the waiting arms of Canadian fashion businessman Lawrence Stroll, but those reports are not confirmed. Either way, whoever landed this Ferrari certainly has one of the most rarest cars on the planet and a much lighter wallet. Plus he gets to tinker around in a classic supercar with an incredible-for-the-era 3,286 cc quad-overhead-cam V-12 powerplant that blasts out 300 horsepower.

Alongside this outrageous auction price, there was also a 1928 Mercedes-Benz 680S Torpedo Roadster that went for $8.25 million; a 1954 Ferrari500 Mondial Spider Series I that went for $3.52 million; and a 1974 McLaren M16C Indianapolis that went for the same $3.52 million.

Click past the jump to see the full million-dollar sales from this past Saturday.

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Ferrari will restore Steve McQueen's 275 GTB4

Ferrari will restore Steve McQueen’s 275 GTB4

Back in 1968 when he was on the Bullitt movie set, legendary American star, Steve McQueen took delivery of a very cool 275 GTB4. Now Ferrari has taken the car back to the factory for a complete restoration. Next to belonging to McQueen, this car has a pretty interesting evolution: the previous owner converted it to a Spider and the new owner wants it converted back to coupe form.

So the new owner took 275 GTB4 to the experts at Ferrari Classiche for the company’s authenticity certification process. The only problem they had was that the transformation from Spider to Coupe could not happen until the vehicle was restored to the exact same specifications as when it left the factory. Now, Ferrari has to restore the car’s roof and add new hand-beaten steel panels.

Considering that only 36 examples were built of the Ferrari 275 GTB4 and that, in recent auctions, most of the 275 GTB4 models went for a large sum of money, we’re thinking it’s in Ferrari’s best interest to have this model fully restored.

We will keep you posted with the development process, so stay tuned!

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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta

The history of the Ferrari 275 began in 1964 when the model was initially brought onto the market. It came as a replacement for the legendary Dayton and only stayed in production for four years until 1968. Initially, the model was offered only in a two-cam version, but at the 1966 Paris Motor Show, Ferrari also unveiled the 275 GTB/4 - or the four-cam version.

The new 275 GTB/4 was designed by Pininfarina, built by Scaglietti, and was the first Ferrari not be offered with wire wheels. It immediately became a legend on the market, and even now, many people still claim it is one of the greatest Ferrari’s ever built. With that stellar history, it’s no surprise that one of the only 330 units built was sold at RM Auctions, Inc (Amelia) for an impressive $1.1 million.

Hit the jump to read more about the 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta.

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Ferrari Myth exhibition opens at Shanghai Expo Park

Ferrari Myth exhibition opens at Shanghai Expo Park

China is becoming a key market for a lot of automotive companies, including Ferrari and, as a thank you gift, the company has opened a new Myth exhibition at the Italian Center in Shanghai Expo Park. The inauguration ceremony was attended by the company’s Deputy Chairman Piero Ferrari, as well as representatives of both the Chinese and Italian governments.

The new exhibition center covers an area of 900 square meters and will be open to the public for three years. Its aim is to introduce the Chinese to Ferrari and allow them to experience the history, cars, technologies, and passion of the Prancing Horse first-hand, thereby further consolidating the already strong links between the Italian marque and this nation.

The models displayed are the 348 TS as the first Ferrari to enter the Chinese mainland market, a 275 GTB4, a 365 GTB4 Daytona, the 750 Monza sports prototype, and the FF.

"For millions of people around the world, Ferrari represents the pinnacle of Italian culture," declared Piero Ferrari. "It is a symbol of passion, success and the constant pursuit of excellence. It has always been our wish to share Ferrari’s unique history and culture with the people of China who have shown great affection for the Prancing Horse and with whom we share core values such as respect for tradition and a tenacious spirit of innovation."

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1966 - 1968 Ferrari 275 GTB4

1966 - 1968 Ferrari 275 GTB4

Revealed in 1966 at the Paris Motor Show the Ferrari 275 GTB4 is the last and the most desirable in the 275 series. The 275 GTB4 is also the first ’production’ Ferrari to be fitted with the four overhead camshaft version of the V12, and was derived directly from the P2 prototype. During 1966 and 1968 Ferrari produced around 330 units.

The difference between a standard 275 GTB and the GTB4 version was its "long nose" and also for the GTB4 version the bonnet had a slim shallow central bulge running from front to rear. Like all the other Ferrari, the 275 GTB4 was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, normally in steel with aluminum doors, bonnet, and boot lid, although a few examples received full aluminum bodies.

The bodies were mounted on a 2400mm wheelbase chassis that had factory reference numbers 596, and all were numbered in the odd chassis number road car sequence. The chassis was virtually identical to that of the two camshaft car, the revised number being due to minor differences in the drive train layout.

Continued after the jump.

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