1975 - 1985 Ferrari 308 GTB

1975 - 1985 Ferrari 308 GTB
- image 321827

In 1975 Ferrari unveiled the 308 GTB at the Paris Auto Show. It was the long awaited replacement for the Dino 246 GT. It was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti until 1985 when it was replaced by 328. The Pininfarina designed body had a pronounced wedge profile, with a rectangular egg-crate aluminum radiator grille below a slim full width satin black front bumper. However, there were numerous key design elements of the Dino 246 GT carried through into the body details. These included the scalloped door intakes, twin circular rear light assemblies, and the vertical concave rear screen bounded by buttressed sail panels. In essence the shape was a modernization of that of the Dino, with enough traces of its predecessor to provide a thread of continuity, earning praise from the press and clients alike.

1975 - 1985 Ferrari 308 GTB
- image 321821
1975 - 1985 Ferrari 308 GTB
- image 321823

One feature that was not immediately apparent, was that the 308 GTB was fitted with a totally fibreglass body, apart from the aluminum front lid. This was the first Ferrari production car to feature fibreglass as a body material, and in fact the idea has not been repeated by the company in large volume production.

Continued after the jump.

 

Latest Ferrari 308 news and reviews:

The 10 Best Ferraris Of All Time

The 10 Best Ferraris Of All Time

From classics to current exotics, Maranello has a long and rich history of performance car excellence

Picking the ten best Ferraris of all time is not an easy exercise, but somebody had to do it. Sports cars don’t come finer than those with a Prancing Horse badge, and in the 70 years that it has been around, Ferrari has built some of the finest and most desirable performance cars in the history of the industry. A lot of Ferrari models have climbed the ladder to iconic status, and even some of today’s models are on their way there, too. It took a lot of work — and arguments — but we managed to narrow down our choices for the ten best Ferraris of all time.

Read more
Car For Sale: All-Electric 1976 Ferrari 308 GTS

Car For Sale: All-Electric 1976 Ferrari 308 GTS

Electric GT’s electric Ferrari 308 GTS is headed to Barrett-Jackson

Back in 2016, we chanced upon this 1976 Ferrari 308 GTS that was restored and turned into an electric car by a company called Electric GT. We hadn’t seen or heard much about it since, but his all-electric Ferrari has returned into our lives because it’s headed to the Barrett-Jackson auction in Scottsdale, Arizona later this month where it’s tipped to sell for good money. Funny how some things come full circle.

Read more
James May Shows Us A Different Way To Do A Walk-Around Video

James May Shows Us A Different Way To Do A Walk-Around Video

It’s far from what we’re used to, but it works.

By now, you’ve probably seen your share of walk-around videos featuring beautiful concepts, insane exotics, and timeless classics. The set-up typically involves a lot of narration, some funky background music, and plenty of glam shots of the car from every conceivable angle. It’s a tried-and-tested method that has given birth to some pretty awesome videos, but ever the contrarian, The Grand Tour’s James May has provided us with a different sort of walk-around video from what we’re used to. Instead of infusing the video with pageantry, he simply walks around the car. Who knew!

The video in question is posted on Drivetribe’s Facebook page and it features May and a Ferrari 308 GTB that he reportedly bought earlier this year. There’s only one camera involved in the video and absolutely no background music to spice it up. What we do see is May leisurely walking around his new Ferrari acquisition, stopping a few times to look closer at certain sections of the car, before completing his literal walk-around. Then he looks at the camera, flashes that unmistakable James May face of approval, and walks off. No commentary. No music (apart from the intro and conclusion). No nothing. It’s definitely a different approach from what we’re used to, but May somehow makes it look authentic and meaningful at the same time. Who knew that Captain Slow could say a thousand words without having to open his mouth.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

Read more
1978 Ferrari 308 GTS By Electric GT

1978 Ferrari 308 GTS By Electric GT

Ferrari doesn’t want an all-electric model, so Electric GT made one itself

It hasn’t been that long since Sergio Marchionne, the CEO of Ferrari, said that the brand’s stable would never have room for an all-electric prancing horse. He even went so far as to say that a Ferrari without a traditional internal combustion engine would be “obscene.” There’s no doubt that a number of Ferrari fanboys inevitably feel the same way, but that didn’t stop an electric car conversion company based out of San Diego, California from creating the world’s first all-electric Ferrari.

The company responsible for this travesty is known as Electric GT. It got its hands on a salvage-titled 1978 Ferrari 308 GTS that had previously be destroyed by fire because of a leaking fuel line. The engine and electrical system had been destroyed beyond repair, so Electric GT decided to rip out the car’s heart and replaced it with the first-even three-motor unit and a battery pack.

The men responsible for the first all-electric Ferrari made it a point to engineer and design a new powerplant that would preserve the car’s integrity. Michael Bream, an EV specialist that worked on the project, said, “We have to be careful with iconic cars, as we want to preserve their history, but still make them impressive to drive. Technology changes, and we are now in a time when an electric SUV is faster than a Ferrari sports car.”

This is probably one of those situations where you’re either really going to like what the company did, or you’re going to hate it. Whether you like the idea of an all-electric Ferrari or not, at the end of the day, turning that 308 GTS in an all-electric car is better than crushing it into a cube and forgetting about it. So, let’s dive on in a take a look at what the company was able to pull off.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 308 GTS By Electric GT.

Read more
Stolen 1982 Ferrari 308 GTSi Found After 28 Years

Stolen 1982 Ferrari 308 GTSi Found After 28 Years

It took someone a long time to get this stolen beauty to export

Auto theft has always been a serious problem, and today manufacturers are combating it more than ever with disabling devices, laser cut keys, and even biometrics. Of course, California has always hosted a number of metro areas that rank the highest for auto theft. Being on the west coast, it’s pretty easy for a professional car thief to jack-move a car, load it on a container ship, and send it across the big blue. Well, not all stolen cars make it to their destination. A prime example is this Ferrari that was stolen 28 years ago and has just now resurfaced as it was about to be shipped out of the Long Beach Seaport.

The car is a 1981 Ferrari GTSi that was stolen from a consignment lot in Orange Country, California on July 19th, 1987. The only reason the car caught the attention of customs agents was because the vehicle identification number (VIN) recorded on the export paperwork was used previously on a 1982 Ferrari 208 GTS that was shipped off to Norway back in 2005. The California Highway Patrol, National Insurance Crime Bureau, and a Ferrari factory expert were able to determine what this car really was.

Back in the 1980s, when the car was stolen, the owner was compensated by his insurance company, and now wishes to remain anonymous. The car has probably been parked the entire time it has been missing, as it only has 45,000 miles on the clock. What happens to the car next is a bit of a mystery, and officials have remained quiet about who was shipping the car or who was receiving it.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
1982 - 1985 Ferrari 308 GTB Quattrovalvole

1982 - 1985 Ferrari 308 GTB Quattrovalvole

The ’70s were a pretty grim time for cars in America. The decade got off to a strong start, but new safety and emissions regulations would effectively kill off the muscle car for several decades, and cars in general became ever more bloated and sluggish. European cars weren’t as popular in America as they are now, and they managed to hold out a bit longer before these regulations ruined the party for them as well. Some companies just stopped selling certain models here, while others complied and strangled the power output even on models for the European market.

One of the more tragic examples of this is the Ferrari 308. Launched in 1975, the 308 was a huge seller for Ferrari, and it was just too important to give up on North American sales once it became time to reign in the emissions. The solution was fuel injection, and while it didn’t so utterly destroy performance as completely as it did with any number of other cars, horsepower numbers did drop significantly. The fix to this was the car you see here, the 308 GTB Quattrovalvole. The car retained the fuel injection, but upgraded to a new head design that brought power back up to where it should be.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 308 GTB Quattrovalvole.

Read more
1980 - 1982 Ferrari 308 GTBi

1980 - 1982 Ferrari 308 GTBi

During the ’70s, there was a major shift in what the definition of a Ferrari really was. Enzo Ferrari had been opposed to mid-engine layouts for a long time, with the reasoning that a horse is supposed to pull a cart, so an engine therefore belongs at the front of a car. Enzo also believed that the setup would be too difficult to drive, but the company’s engineers convinced him that it wouldn’t be, and the first Belinetta Boxer models hit dealerships in 1973.

But, Enzo still held firm that Ferraris should have 12-cylinder engines, and when the idea came up to sell road-going versions of the six- and eight-cylinder Dino race cars, these weren’t allowed to wear Ferrari badges. But, that too changed with the 308, a mid-engine, V-8 road car that ended up being such a massive success. Ferrari has kept a mid-engine, V-8 berlinetta as its primary mainstream model ever since. An improved version of the car, known as the 328, was sold all of the way up until 1989, and the 308 was also the basis for the 288 GTO, considered by many to be Ferrari’s first real supercar. Clearly, it was an exceptional car in its day.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 308 GTBi.

Read more
The Car Show: Season 1 Episode 8

The Car Show: Season 1 Episode 8

This week’s episode of The Car Show packed many of the things that were vacant from the last week’s episode. Yes, we said it, there was much more Car Show and a lot less filler crap.

Some of the mini segments did make their way into the show, including 0-60 (one of our favorites), Behind the Wheel, and of course, One for the Road. Aside from that, there were more celebrity appearances with two different interviews and a trip up the German Autobahn and down the Pacific Coast Highway in an Audi R8 V10 Spyder.

If anyone finds Adam Carolla the least bit annoying then you’ll be happy to know that he participates in Red Bull’s SoapBox Derby and falls a little short of the finish line. One nasty scrape later and he still finds a way to piss people off. All for the love of cars.

Hit the jump for more details on The Car Show: Season 1 Episode 8.

view all
Read more
Top Gear USA: Season 2 Episode 5

Top Gear USA: Season 2 Episode 5

Right off the bat, we have to admit that this week’s episode of Top Gear USA was a lot funnier than any other episode this season. The majority of the episode was spent trying to figure out which of the three hosts chose a better luxury car. However, instead of being the long and drawn out segment as found in previous episodes, this challenge made us laugh out loud a few times. The guys were driving around the Hamptons in a 1972 Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, a 1982 Jaguar XJS, and a 1988 Pontiac Fiero turned Ferrari 308. Oh yeah, the Hamptonites just loved that.

In between the search for the best luxury car for $5,000, Tanner Foust got to take a spin in "the Beast," the Porsche 911 GT2 RS and Torchwood star, Arlene Tur took a speedy trip around the Top Gear test track in the Suzuki SX4.

Hit the jump for full details on Top Gear USA: Season 2 Episode 5.

view all
Read more
1975 - 1985 Ferrari 308 GTB

1975 - 1985 Ferrari 308 GTB

In 1975 Ferrari unveiled the 308 GTB at the Paris Auto Show. It was the long awaited replacement for the Dino 246 GT. It was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti until 1985 when it was replaced by 328. The Pininfarina designed body had a pronounced wedge profile, with a rectangular egg-crate aluminum radiator grille below a slim full width satin black front bumper. However, there were numerous key design elements of the Dino 246 GT carried through into the body details. These included the scalloped door intakes, twin circular rear light assemblies, and the vertical concave rear screen bounded by buttressed sail panels. In essence the shape was a modernization of that of the Dino, with enough traces of its predecessor to provide a thread of continuity, earning praise from the press and clients alike.

One feature that was not immediately apparent, was that the 308 GTB was fitted with a totally fibreglass body, apart from the aluminum front lid. This was the first Ferrari production car to feature fibreglass as a body material, and in fact the idea has not been repeated by the company in large volume production.

Continued after the jump.

Read more
1977 - 1980 Ferrari 308 GTS

1977 - 1980 Ferrari 308 GTS

The Ferrari 308 GTB got an open-top version in 1977 at the Frankfurt Salon. Called 308 GTS, the car remained into production until 1980 with 3219 produced, around 50% more than the concurrent 308 GTB model.

The 308 GTS joined the Ferrari model range at the 1977 Frankfurt Salon. Visually it was very similar to its 308 GTB berlinetta stable mate, apart from the black finished solid removable glass-fiber roof panel, and the satin black finished hinged opening louvre panels over the rear quarter windows. They were hinged to permit cleaning of the rear quarter glass, and the one on the left side also gave access to the fuel filler cap, and both were lockable.

The "S" in the model title stood for "Spider", although as with the Dino 246 GTS, the spider title was a degree of artistic license, as it was in fact a targa top, with a roof panel that could be stowed behind the seats for open air motoring. As on the 308 GTB, a luggage compartment was provided in the tail of the car behind the engine bay, accessed by lifting the entire engine bay cover, which revealed a zip top luggage compartment at the rear.

Read more
1980 - 1983 Ferrari 308 GTSi

1980 - 1983 Ferrari 308 GTSi

In 1980 Ferrari unveiled the 308 GTSi, the spider version of the 308 GTBi. The "i" in the model designation referring to the fitment of fuel injection. The car stayed into production through to the beginning of 1983, during which time 1749 examples were produced, in both left and right hand drive configurations.

Visually the new model was almost identical to the outgoing one, although the casting pattern of the five spoke alloy wheels changed slightly due to the fitment of Michelin TRX metric size radial tires. However, the imperial size Michelin XWX tyres on 14” wheels, or Pirelli P7 tires on 16” wheels were available as an option.

As with the 308 GTS targa roof model, the removable roof panel was stowed in a cover behind the seats when not in use, and the rear quarter windows behind the doors featured hinged satin black finished slatted covers.

Read more
1982 - 1985 Ferrari 308 GTS Quattrovalvole

1982 - 1985 Ferrari 308 GTS Quattrovalvole

Along with the coupe version, Ferrari also revealed the 308 GTS Quattrovalvole - the 308 GTB Quattrovalvole targa version. The car remained into production from 1982 to 1985, with 3042 units produced, in both right and left hand drive versions. All US market examples were fitted with catalytic convertors.

The Quattrovalvole part of the model name referred to the four valves per cylinder heads on the engine, which provided increased power over the preceding model.

Along with the other chages, also seen in the coupe version: the addition of a slim louvre panel in the front lid to aid radiator exhaust air exit, paired electrically operated door mirrors with a small enamel Ferrari badge on the shell, a revised radiator grille with rectangular driving lights at the extremities, and rectangular (instead of round) side repeater lights, on the targa version the removable grained satin black finished roof panel was stowed in a vinyl cover behind the seats when not in use.

Read more