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Ferrari 328

1985 - 1989 Ferrari 328 GTB

1985 - 1989 Ferrari 328 GTB
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In 1985 Ferrari replaced the 308 Series with the 328 series, in both coupe and spider version. The 328 GTB continued in production for four years, until replaced by the 348 tb model in the Autumn of 1989, with 1344 units produced. The new 328 GTB was a revised and updated version of the 308 GTB, which had survived for almost a decade without any radical change to the overall shape, albeit with various changes to the 3 litre engine. The 328 model presented a softening of the wedge profile of its predecessor, with a redesigned nose that had a more rounded shape, which was complimented by similar treatment to the tail valance panel.

1985 - 1989 Ferrari 328 GTB
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1985 - 1989 Ferrari 328 GTB
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The revised nose and tail sections featured body colour bumpers integral with the valance panels, which reflected the work done concurrently to present the Mondial 3.2 models, with which they also shared a similar radiator grille and front light assembly layout.

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Collection Of Eight Ferraris Worth More Than $11 Million Heading To Auction

Collection Of Eight Ferraris Worth More Than $11 Million Heading To Auction

Collecting classic vehicles is quite an expensive hobby if you fancy exotic sports cars, but nothing can drain your multi-million-dollar bank account quicker than a Ferrari collection. As a renowned Ferrari collector and long-time customer, Tony Shooshani knows this better than anyone else, having amassed a Prancing Horse stable that includes some of the rarest models ever built. After years of buying them, Shooshani has now decided to part with eight of his Ferraris, all of which will be auctioned by Gooding & Company at its annual two-day Scottsdale Auctions between January 29-30, 2016.

If you were planning to start your own Ferrari collection, now is as good a time as any. Given you have at least $11 million to spare, that is!

The lot includes some of finest Ferrari supercars ever produced, as well as a couple of classic entry-level models that can still be had for less than one million bucks. The most expensive units are a 1995 F50 and a 2003 Enzo, which are estimated to fetch more than $2.5 million each. There is also a 1990 F40 that Gooding & Company estimates will fetch between $1.3 and 1.6 million.

Classic models include a 250 GT Cabriolet and a 250 GT Lusso, which, not surprisingly, are likely to change owners for more than $2 million. At the more affordable end of the list, there’s a 1969 Dino 206 GT ($700,000-$800,000), a 1984 512 BBi ($400,000-$475,000), and a 1988 328 GTS ($125,000-$150,000).

All told, the estimated value of the entire lot sits between $11.6 and $13.5 million. That’s a lot of dough if you’re not familiar with how much classic Ferraris fetch nowadays, but not that much considering that a 250 GTO can change owners for as much as $50 million.

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1985 - 1989 Ferrari 328 GTB

1985 - 1989 Ferrari 328 GTB

In 1985 Ferrari replaced the 308 Series with the 328 series, in both coupe and spider version. The 328 GTB continued in production for four years, until replaced by the 348 tb model in the Autumn of 1989, with 1344 units produced. The new 328 GTB was a revised and updated version of the 308 GTB, which had survived for almost a decade without any radical change to the overall shape, albeit with various changes to the 3 litre engine. The 328 model presented a softening of the wedge profile of its predecessor, with a redesigned nose that had a more rounded shape, which was complimented by similar treatment to the tail valance panel.

The revised nose and tail sections featured body colour bumpers integral with the valance panels, which reflected the work done concurrently to present the Mondial 3.2 models, with which they also shared a similar radiator grille and front light assembly layout.

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1985 - 1989 Ferrari 328 GTS

1985 - 1989 Ferrari 328 GTS

In 1985 at the Frankfurt Motor Show Ferrari unveiled the 328 GTS (next to the 328 GTB version) model - the replacement for the 308 series. But compared with the car it replaced, the 328 featured a new exterior styling, improved road holding and most important a transversely mounted V8 with an enlarged bore and stroke. The 328 figures in the model title referred to the total cubic capacity of the engine, 3.2 liters, and 8 for the number of cylinders. The car remained into production until 1989, with 6068 units produced.

The 328 was again designed by Pininfarina, who made significant changes to modernize the looks of the 328 and improve its aerodynamics. The 328 model presented a softening of the wedge profile of its predecessor, with a redesigned nose that had a more rounded shape, which was complimented by similar treatment to the tail valance panel. The revised nose and tail sections featured body colour bumpers integral with the valance panels, which reflected the work done concurrently to present the Mondial 3.2 models, with which they also shared a similar radiator grille and front light assembly layout.

Thus all the eight cylinder cars in the range shared fairly unified front and rear aspects, providing a homogeneous family image. The exhaust air louvres behind the retractable headlight pods on the 308 series disappeared, coupled with an increase in the size of the front lid radiator exhaust air louvre, which had been introduced on the 308 Quattrovalvole models, whilst a new style and position of exterior door catch was also provided.

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1986 - 1989 Ferrari GTB Turbo

1986 - 1989 Ferrari GTB Turbo

When talk turns to early examples of turbocharged Ferraris, most people think of cars like the 288 GTO or the F40. But Ferrari was turbocharging before that, as a means of making entry-level models more affordable for the Italian market. Ferrari had only started making entry level cars with actual Ferrari badges in the mid-’70s, but by the early ’80s, it was clear that it had been the right call. The 308 was bringing in tons of money, but in Ferrari’s home of Italy, cars with engines that exceeded 2.0-liters of displacement were very heavily taxed, and the 3.0-liter V-8-powered 308 wasn’t really that great of an entry level car.

The solution was a car with a smaller engine, one that was naturally aspirated in base form, but also got a turbocharger for those unwilling to sacrifice power for cheaper taxes. This car was the 208, and when the 308 evolved into the 328, the “tax cheat” version of the car evolved into the GTB Turbo, with the naturally aspirated base model dropped from the lineup. The car isn’t very well known outside of Italy, since there wasn’t a reason for most people outside of Italy to buy one, but it sold very well there.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari GTB Turbo.

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