Cars Ferrari Ferrari 400

Ferrari 400

1976 - 1979 Ferrari 400 Automatic

1976 - 1979 Ferrari 400 Automatic
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The ’70s were a slightly troubling time in automotive history. There were some indisputably great cars to come out of the decade, but there were a lot of other big bloated barges being made, and quite a few other questionable decisions. One of these controversial decisions was made by Ferrari, and it was to make a car with an automatic transmission. This accompanied the decision to build the 400 at all in the first place, something a lot of people still consider to have been a mistake on Ferrari’s part. So this is obviously a somewhat controversial car made all the more controversial.

The 400A, as it was called in automatic form, debuted in 1976, the same year as the 512 BB and the year after the 308. It was nowhere near as popular as the 308 would prove to be, but the 400A did quite well. And, even if the purists did moan about the automatic transmission, the 400A outsold the manual-equipped version of the car by more than 2 to 1, and the same still held true when the 400 became the 400i in 1979. It does make sense though, as the ability to afford a Ferrari is not the same as the ability to drive one.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 400 Automatic.

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1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica LWB Coupe Aerodinamico

1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica LWB Coupe Aerodinamico

In the days before the F40, Ferrari still made very special, very limited-production production models that sold for huge sums of the money. The difference was that in those days, the cars were grand tourers instead of sports cars, belonging to a series known as the America cars. These were usually big GT cars with engines that were much bigger than those found in the rest of the Ferrari lineup. They had special styling and interiors that were much more luxurious than even the 2+2 Ferrari models. The 400 Superamerica fist debuted in 1959, with the Series II version debuting in 1962. And despite the name similarity, it bears no relation whatsoever to the later 400 2+2 of the ’70s and ’80s.

The 400 Superamerica sat at the very top of the Ferrari lineup during its lifetime, an era that also gave us the bulk of what are today the most valuable Ferrari models, and therefore the most valuable cars in the world. But unlike the more mainstream (if that is ever the right word for a V-12 Ferrari) models, the motorsports pedigree isn’t so obvious with the Superamerica, but that in itself is something that makes the Superamerica unique, at least in this era of Ferrari.

Update 02/04/2016: The Ferrari 400 Superamerica LWB Coupe Aerodinamico sold for $3.3 million through RM Auctions. That price falls perfectly in line with RM’s predicted selling price between $3.2 and $3.6 million.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 400 Superamerica LWB Coupe Aerodinamico.

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Rare Ferrari Superamerica Aerodinamico Can Be Yours For $3 Million

Rare Ferrari Superamerica Aerodinamico Can Be Yours For $3 Million

RM Sothebys has a history of selling off some of the finest examples of cars out there. One prime example is a 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Aerodinamico that is scheduled to go under the hammer on February 3rd, 2016 in Paris. This car, like many others, is quite rare in its own way and is actually the first of only 18 long-wheelbase examples of the Series II Ferrari 400.

Chassis No. 3931 SA was completed by Ferrari in July of 1962 before it was sent off to Pininfarina where the beautiful body you see before you was created. The car then made a stop at 1962 Earls Court auto show before being delivered to Luigi Chinetti Motors in New York for $13,017. The car was eventually sold to a San Francisco resident in the 1970s and restored in the 1980s by Terry York Motor Cars. It was later sold and Registered in Japan until the mid-1990s when it became part of the Yoshiho Matsuda Collection and displayed at the 1995 Matsuda Ferrari Museum of Art.

By the 2000s, the car made it back to the U.S. where it was used lightly before making one last trip back to Europe where it has been ever since. Now scheduled to be auctioned, the car is offered with matching numbers and in its original color combination of Grigio Argento over Nero. As the first Long-wheelbase model, the car has a wheelbase of 2,600mm (almost 102.5 inches) and is powered by a 3.9-liter V-12 engine with a four-speed manual transmission. If you’re of the wealthy population and would like to own such a prime example of history, this 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Aerodinamico is expected to go for $3 million.

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1985 - 1989 Ferrari 412

1985 - 1989 Ferrari 412

Throughout the ’60s, Ferrari’s money came mostly from slightly bigger 2+2 versions of its V-12 sports cars. It was a strategy that worked well for the young and still growing company, but as it entered into the ’70s, things started to change. The smaller Dino-badged vehicles were doing well and bringing in tons of money, with Ferrari eventually introducing a whole new line of V-8 models by the mid-’70s. The Daytona flagship sports car was replaced by the Berlinetta Boxer, a mid-engine car with a flat-12 instead of the V-12 that was still found in the bigger 2+2s. And, “bigger” is the right word, as the 2+2 got much bigger in 1972 with the introduction of the 365 GT4 2+2.

The upshot of all of this is that the big V-12 2+2 cars found themselves, by the early 80s, not to be quite as important to the company, and also cut adrift from the company’s flagship models in terms of the evolution of their styling and drivetrain. Ferrari seemed not to know what to do with these cars, and it unfortunately sort of shows in the final product. The 412 was the last of this series of 2+2s, the best of them, even, for what it’s worth.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 412.

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1976 - 1979 Ferrari 400 Automatic

1976 - 1979 Ferrari 400 Automatic

The ’70s were a slightly troubling time in automotive history. There were some indisputably great cars to come out of the decade, but there were a lot of other big bloated barges being made, and quite a few other questionable decisions. One of these controversial decisions was made by Ferrari, and it was to make a car with an automatic transmission. This accompanied the decision to build the 400 at all in the first place, something a lot of people still consider to have been a mistake on Ferrari’s part. So this is obviously a somewhat controversial car made all the more controversial.

The 400A, as it was called in automatic form, debuted in 1976, the same year as the 512 BB and the year after the 308. It was nowhere near as popular as the 308 would prove to be, but the 400A did quite well. And, even if the purists did moan about the automatic transmission, the 400A outsold the manual-equipped version of the car by more than 2 to 1, and the same still held true when the 400 became the 400i in 1979. It does make sense though, as the ability to afford a Ferrari is not the same as the ability to drive one.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 400 Automatic.

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1976 - 1979 Ferrari 400 GT

1976 - 1979 Ferrari 400 GT

Even the best don’t quite get it right every time. That’s a phrase that gets tossed about a lot when the subject of the Ferrari 400GT comes up. Many critics have pointed to this car as not being up to the marque’s high standards, but what was wrong with it? Was it, objectively, that bad a car?

On paper, the 400GT does seem to violate a number of important Ferrari tenets. Based on the front-engine, rear-drive 365 GT4 2+2, the 400GT’s street cred was dented by its four-seat grand-tourer status, but the availability of an automatic transmission was the nail in the coffin for many. The 1976 400GT was the first Ferrari to be offered with an automatic transmission. The move made sense, as the car competed with other grand tourers like the Aston Martin AMV8 and Jensen Interceptor, but it’s hard to avoid thinking of the 400GT as the start down a road that has led to today’s California and FF.

Though it hasn’t received much love in hindsight, the 400GT was a successful car for Ferrari. It actually outsold the exotic Boxer with which it shared showroom space.In its various guises, the grand tourer that started as the 365 GT4 2+2 was in production from 1972 until 1989, making it Ferrari’s longest-lived model series.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 400 GT.

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1960 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Cabriolet by Pininfarina

1960 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Cabriolet by Pininfarina

The Ferrari America was a grand tourer produced between 1951 and 1967. The first model was the 340 America, which came with the new Lampredi V-12 developed for use in Formula 1 racing. Following the 340 was the 342 and the 375, with the 410 Superamerica first introduced in 1955. Finally, in 1959, Ferrari released the 400 Superamerica in both coupe and roadster body styles. Only 47 total were produced.

Now, over a half-century later, the Ferrari 400 Superamerica is considered one of the greatest grand touring Ferraris of all time, and consequently, one of the most collectible classic sports cars in the world. This past weekend, RM Auctions put one up on the auction block for the European Sports-Touring cars sale at Amelia Island, Florida.

The particular example before you, a 1960 SWB Cabriolet, is exceptionally rare, sporting chassis number 1945 SA and complete with an unusual and highly desirable interior/exterior color scheme combination. It’s passed between a succession of respected car collectors, including Oscar Davis. The car recently underwent a no-expense-spared expert restoration, and is presented in factory-perfect condition both visually and mechanically.

Click Continue Reading to learn more about the 1960 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Cabriolet by Pininfarina.

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1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Coupé Aerodinamico by Pininfarina

1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Coupé Aerodinamico by Pininfarina

Ferrari had a big problem with its 400 series when it debuted in 1959. Sure, the car packed a racing V-12 and all the gravitas a Ferrari badge can bring, but its brutal style made the front-engine 2+2 GT car a tough sell in one of Ferrari’s fastest-growing markets: the United States.

An emergency refresh was undertaken. Gone was the 400’s square grille and quad headlamp setup, replaced by Ferrari’s delicious oval slatted grille and single round headlamps under glass at each corner. Suddenly, the 400 Superamerica SWB Coupé Aerodinamico was as gorgeous as its two-seat siblings.

This very car, one of 36 built, is owned by famed driving instructor Skip Barber and is set for auction this weekend on May 25th by RM Auctions in Lake Cuomo, Italy. The pre-sale estimate is between $2.4 and $3 million, but the bidding could well reach $5 million before the dust settles.

Beneath the Superamerica Aerodinamico’s sumptuous bodywork lies the vanguard of Ferrari tech at the time, much like the Ferrari 456GT and current FF. Part of the “America” series of cars that included the 330 GT and 365 GTC, the plan in Modena was to leverage the flexibility offered by their small-scale Pininfarina bodywork team to create unique shells that would sell cars in crucial markets, like New York and Los Angeles, as well as Firenzi and Roma.

Click past the jump for the full review and photo gallery of this timeless classic, the 400 Superamerica Coupe SWB Aerodinamico.

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1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica auctioned for $3.5 Million

1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica auctioned for $3.5 Million

A 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica has been auctioned this past weekend for an impressive $3.5 million, the highest price ever paid for a Ferrari Superamerica, but also a little lower than they had originally anticipated. At the same RM’s Sporting Classics auction in Monaco, a 1960 Maserati Tipo 61 "Birdcage" was sold for over $3.3 million. It’s a shame we are desensitized to these outrageous prices, especially after the 1936 Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantic sold for $30-$40 million.

The 400 SuperAmerica was powered by a 4.0-liter Gioachino designed V12 engine that delivered 340 hp at 7000 rpm. The engine was coupled to a 4-speed, all synchromesh gearbox, fitted with an electronic overdrive unit on top gear, driving through a universally jointed propeller shaft to a rigid rear axle. The 0 to 60 mph sprint was made in 9.2 seconds, while top speed went up to 174 mph.

TheFerrari was able to fetch such an impressive price due to the history behind it. The Ferrari Superamerica was one of only a handful of “short-wheelbase” 400 cabriolets ever built with a 95-inch wheelbase. It was sold in Arizona back in 1962 where it was immediately to the Bonneville Speed Trials.

Hit the jump for a video displaying this beauty inch by inch.

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Rare Ferrari 400 Superamerica up for auction; could fetch $5 Million

Rare Ferrari 400 Superamerica up for auction; could fetch $5 Million

The Ferrari 400 SuperAmerica was originally unveiled in 1959 at the Turin Motor Show in Italy as a more powerful replacement for the outgoing 410. During the new car’s lifetime only 46 examples were built, with only six being short wheelbase convertibles. This particular model that will roll across the auction block on May 1st just so happens to be the last one ever constructed and adding even more to its classic car’s collectibility is that it is the only to featuring a set of sport style covered headlights and is expected to be sold for around $5,000,000.

The 400 SuperAmerica is powered by a 4.0 Liter Gioachino designed Ferrari V12 that produced 340 HP at a screaming 7000 RPM and could accelerate from 0 to 60 MPH in 9.2 seconds and reach a top speed of 174 MPH. The auction will take place at The Grimaldi Forum in Monaco and is part of the RM Auction circuit.

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1979 - 1985 Ferrari 400 Automatic i

1979 - 1985 Ferrari 400 Automatic i

In November 1979 Ferrari replaced the 400 Automatic with the 400 Automatic i, "i" suffix in the model name standing for "injection", as a fuel injection system replaced the two banks of three side draught Weber carburettors. The car stayed into production until 1985, during which time 883 examples were constructed, in right or left hand drive steering.

The adoption of fuel injection was to satisfy ever more stringent worldwide emission legislation, and it dropped the claimed power output to 310bhp. The engine was a V12 unit with a bore and stroke of 81mm x 78mm giving a total capacity of 4823cc, with factory type reference number F 101 D 070, coupled to a Borg Warner 3 speed automatic gearbox. This transmitted power through a propeller shaft to a limited slip differential, and from there via half shafts to the independently suspended rear wheels with hydraulic self levelling units.

The engine delivered 310 hp and sprinted the car to a top speed of 149 mph.

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1979 - 1985 Ferrari 400 GTi

1979 - 1985 Ferrari 400 GTi

As for the 400 Automatic, the 4000 GT also got an "i" version in 1979. The "i" suffix in the model name standing for "injection", as a fuel injection system replaced the two banks of three side draught Weber carburettors. The 400 GTi stayed in production from 1979 to 1985, with 422 units produced in both right and left drive steering configuration, but with no USA market version was available.

Under the hood Ferrari placed a V12 unit with a bore and stroke of 81mm x 78mm giving a total capacity of 4823cc, with factory type reference number F 101 D 010, coupled to a Borg Warner 3 speed automatic gearbox. This transmitted power through a propeller shaft to a limited slip differential, and from there via half shafts to the independently suspended rear wheels with hydraulic self levelling units. The engine delivered 310 HP, while top speed went up to 152 mph.

The 400 GTi was initially visually identical to its predecessor both internally and externally apart from the addition of an "i" to the tail badge. In late 1982 some mechanical and cosmetic changes took place to the model. The engine received revised profile camshafts and new exhaust manifolds, which upped the power output by about 5 HP, and the hydraulic self levelling rear suspension changed to a gas filled system, coupled to new metric rim wheels with lower profile tyres.

Continued after the jump.

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