1976 - 1981 Ferrari 512 BB

1976 - 1981 Ferrari 512 BB High Resolution Exterior
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The shape is so familiar, so iconic, so quintessentially "Ferrari" for enthusiasts who grew up in the 1980s that it’s hard to believe that the Ferrari 512BB actually had a bit of a struggle to make it into production. A mid-engine layout is practically standard equipment on modern supercars, but Enzo Ferrari wasn’t always sold on the concept for road cars.The opinionated leader of the company believed that the cars would be too difficult for owners to drive safely, in spite of the on-track benefits of the design.

Still, the idea of a roadgoing car that shared the horizontally opposed engines and mid-engine layout of racing Ferraris was too tempting to pass up. The car did go into production, in the end, and the first Berlinetta Boxer hit the streets in 1973 as the 365 GT4 BB. The car was a dramatic departure from Ferrari’s front-engined cars, and effectively set the tone for Ferrari’s most iconic vehicles through the 1990s. In 1976, a round of styling and mechanical updates renamed the car 512 BB. The name change came courtesy of a larger, 5.0-liter 12-cylinder engine and conveniently shared the name with a classic Ferrari race car.

This was adequate, as the 512 BB was a genuine supercar. It offered race-bred dynamics, stunning looks and a top speed of nearly 200 mph. The car got worldwide attention in spite of never being officially imported to North America, and squared off successfully against the world’s supercars until 1985, when it was succeeded by the even more extreme Testarossa.

 

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1995 Ferrari F512 M

1995 Ferrari F512 M

The final hurrah of the Ferrari Testarossa

The Ferrari F512 M was the last evolution of the Testarossa, unarguably one of the legendary cars of the ‘80s. The F512 M was lighter than its predecessor, featured more modern styling, and boasted improved handling characteristics.

Everyone knows the Testarossa. With its red cam covers, its long “cheese graters” on the sides, and angular design, it’s a staple of its time and one of Ferrari’s modern icons. At the time, it was every bit as fast as a Countach, if not slightly faster. It handled slightly better and, more importantly, was a more relaxed tourer in that you could actually drive the Testarossa for 500 miles at a time and not drop dead from back pain afterward.

The F512 TR continued the trend and refined the recipe, but the ultimate expression of this body shape came in 1994 and was christened F512 M, where M stands for “Modificato.” Indeed, there were many modifications done to the F512 M even in comparison to the F512 TR, but the same spirit was still there. It was to be the rarest of all the Testarossas since only 501 were built through 1996 when Ferrari rolled out the front-engined grand tourer called 550 Maranello.

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SCG Makes History: The Ferrari 512 Modulo Finally Runs

SCG Makes History: The Ferrari 512 Modulo Finally Runs

The fully restored Prancing Horse is captured on the move!

One of Ferrari’s weirdest one-off concepts just re-emerged in the wild, and now it’s headed to Monterey Car Week as a crazy ‘70s throwback.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Celebrity Special – Happy Birthday Sammy Hagar!

Celebrity Special – Happy Birthday Sammy Hagar!

The Red Rocker turns 70 today!

Sammy Hagar is not your typical rock artist. The man has been busy making music for about 50 years now, not only as a solo artist, but also as front man for a variety of supergroups and major bands, including more than a decade as the singer for Van Halen. First fronting for the Fabulous Castilles at just 20 years of age, Hagar’s first major break arrived in the early ‘70s with the band Montrose, writing hits such as “Bad Motor Scooter.” By the mid-‘70s, Hagar launched his solo career, and after signing with Geffen Records, he released a string of big hits, including “There’s Only One Way To Rock” and “Your Love Is Driving Me Crazy.” However, as gear heads and car lovers know, there’s one song in particular that gets our attention – “I Can’t Drive 55,” off 1984’s VOA.

Featuring Hagar behind the wheel of a jet black Ferrari BB512i, “I Can’t Drive 55” is an iconic driving song. The video shows the Red Rocker doing hot laps around Saugus Speedway, a race track in Santa Clarita, California. On the way home, Hagar has a run in with the California Highway Patrol, who promptly haul the wild man to jail for his high-speed antics. It’s an anthem of automotive rebellion, a relatable tale for anyone who’s ever been tempted by the siren song of the long loud pedal in a fast car.

These days, Hagar is busy touring with his latest project, The Circle, formed in 2014 and featuring Michael Anthony on bass, Vic Johnson on guitar, and Jason Bonham on drums. Joining him as the opening act is his son, Andrew Hagar, a talented singer-songwriter in his own right.

Happy Birthday, Sammy!

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1976 - 1981 Ferrari 512 BB

1976 - 1981 Ferrari 512 BB

The shape is so familiar, so iconic, so quintessentially "Ferrari" for enthusiasts who grew up in the 1980s that it’s hard to believe that the Ferrari 512BB actually had a bit of a struggle to make it into production. A mid-engine layout is practically standard equipment on modern supercars, but Enzo Ferrari wasn’t always sold on the concept for road cars.The opinionated leader of the company believed that the cars would be too difficult for owners to drive safely, in spite of the on-track benefits of the design.

Still, the idea of a roadgoing car that shared the horizontally opposed engines and mid-engine layout of racing Ferraris was too tempting to pass up. The car did go into production, in the end, and the first Berlinetta Boxer hit the streets in 1973 as the 365 GT4 BB. The car was a dramatic departure from Ferrari’s front-engined cars, and effectively set the tone for Ferrari’s most iconic vehicles through the 1990s. In 1976, a round of styling and mechanical updates renamed the car 512 BB. The name change came courtesy of a larger, 5.0-liter 12-cylinder engine and conveniently shared the name with a classic Ferrari race car.

This was adequate, as the 512 BB was a genuine supercar. It offered race-bred dynamics, stunning looks and a top speed of nearly 200 mph. The car got worldwide attention in spite of never being officially imported to North America, and squared off successfully against the world’s supercars until 1985, when it was succeeded by the even more extreme Testarossa.

Read more
1991 - 1994 Ferrari 512 TR

1991 - 1994 Ferrari 512 TR

Introduced in 1984 as a replacement for the Berlinetta Boxer, the Ferrari Testarossa became an icon of 1980s retro culture due to its radical design and significantly more premium interior, compared to other Maranello-built sports car. The coupe soldiered on mostly unchanged until 1991, when it was replaced by the 512 TR.

Although it was presented as a new car, the 512 TR retained the Testarossa’s dramatic design language, as well as the flat-12 powerplant. Of course, improved internals made the 512 TR quicker and more powerful than its predecessor, while a revised weight distribution also made it more stable under full throttle.

Compared to its predecessor, the 512 TR was short lived, being produced for only three years (compared to the Testarossa’s seven-year run). As a result, the 512 TR was also built in significantly less numbers, with only 2,261 examples leaving the factory until 1994. Although this figure makes it rather scarce compared to the Testarossa (produced in more than 7,100 units), the 512 TR isn’t the rarest Testarossa, a feat that goes to the F512 M, the second and final upgrade for the nameplate.

Having already reviewed the standard Testarossa and the Testarossa Spider one-off, it’s time we also have a better look at the 512 TR. Keep reading to find out what set it apart from the original model.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 512 TR.

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Collection Of Eight Ferraris Worth More Than $11 Million Heading To Auction

Collection Of Eight Ferraris Worth More Than $11 Million Heading To Auction

Collecting classic vehicles is quite an expensive hobby if you fancy exotic sports cars, but nothing can drain your multi-million-dollar bank account quicker than a Ferrari collection. As a renowned Ferrari collector and long-time customer, Tony Shooshani knows this better than anyone else, having amassed a Prancing Horse stable that includes some of the rarest models ever built. After years of buying them, Shooshani has now decided to part with eight of his Ferraris, all of which will be auctioned by Gooding & Company at its annual two-day Scottsdale Auctions between January 29-30, 2016.

If you were planning to start your own Ferrari collection, now is as good a time as any. Given you have at least $11 million to spare, that is!

The lot includes some of finest Ferrari supercars ever produced, as well as a couple of classic entry-level models that can still be had for less than one million bucks. The most expensive units are a 1995 F50 and a 2003 Enzo, which are estimated to fetch more than $2.5 million each. There is also a 1990 F40 that Gooding & Company estimates will fetch between $1.3 and 1.6 million.

Classic models include a 250 GT Cabriolet and a 250 GT Lusso, which, not surprisingly, are likely to change owners for more than $2 million. At the more affordable end of the list, there’s a 1969 Dino 206 GT ($700,000-$800,000), a 1984 512 BBi ($400,000-$475,000), and a 1988 328 GTS ($125,000-$150,000).

All told, the estimated value of the entire lot sits between $11.6 and $13.5 million. That’s a lot of dough if you’re not familiar with how much classic Ferraris fetch nowadays, but not that much considering that a 250 GTO can change owners for as much as $50 million.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Sammy Hagar - I Can't Drive 55: Video

Sammy Hagar - I Can’t Drive 55: Video

Back on January 2nd, 1974, Richard Nixon signed the Emergency Highway Energy Conservation Act – a law that set the national speed limit to 55 mph. In response to that act, Sammy Hagar released a song called “I Can’t Drive 55” that stuck with him even with his tours as a member of Van Halen. In the video, Hagar is driving a black Ferrari BB512i around a track and decides to take it on the road. He drives recklessly, attempting to pass other vehicles, eventually running a police officer off the road and later being arrested.

As the video continues, Hagar and his crew eventually get dragged away to jail. It only last for a short time, as he quickly breaks down the door, and we see him driving that 512 off into the sunset – only after speeding away from two cops who were chasing him down a long desert road.

It is nice to look back into the past. It reminds me of a time when cars in music videos were more than just Bentleys with big wheels, and more interior-mounted screens than you can count on one hand. Plus you’ve got hand it to him for choosing such a prime example of a vehicle. According to Hagar, he burned out the clutch of that 512 when the video was being shot – a repair that cost him $5,800. Take a look into the past and enjoy the video!

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Jim Glickenhaus Buys the Ferrari Modulo Concept by Pininfarina

Jim Glickenhaus Buys the Ferrari Modulo Concept by Pininfarina

I’m not old enough to really remember the Ferrari Modulo, but I do know some uncles of mine who attest to having knock-off posters of the concept stapled to their walls. The car was a revolutionary wonder back in its day, a space ship-looking oddity that Pininfarina actually designed and developed, and was based on the Ferrari 512S.

These days, the Modulo Concept can be found locked and hidden deep inside Pininfarina’s vault. Or at least it was until Jim Glickenhaus somehow convinced the Italian design house to sell it to him.

Road & Track is reporting as such and there’s no reason to raise an eyebrow on this report. Glickenhaus himself reached out to Road & Track to announce his latest automotive purchase. As if the man doesn’t have enough unique Ferraris to call his own; he’s adding another one to this stable that might win out as the strangest of them all.

Apparently, Glickenhaus isn’t just buying the Modulo; he also plans to rebuild it and unleash it to the world. R&T is reporting that the entire build process will take place in Europe before the car makes the voyage back to New York where it will be registered and, well, you know what’s going to happen after that.

Glickenhaus didn’t give an exact timetable on how long the restoration is going to take, but he did say that the Modulo could be prepared and finished in time for the 2015 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este on May 22, 2015.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 512S Modulo Concept By Pininfarina.

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Video: Chris Harris Drives a 1992 Ferrari 512 TR to Get Bread

Video: Chris Harris Drives a 1992 Ferrari 512 TR to Get Bread

We’ve all had one of those mornings. you wake up, stumble out of bed and realize you need bread, milk, or something of the sort. At that point, we just hop into the old grocery getter and hightail it to the local market to get what we need. According to this video, Chris Harris isn’t immune to this issue, but his grocery getter is a little unorthodox... to say the least.

Yeah, he heads into town — driving on one of the most awesome roads on the planet — in a 1992 Ferrari 512 TR, with the "TR" standing for Testarossa, of course.

It’s not too often that Harris limits himself to just four words in one of his videos, but that’s exactly how many words he speaks through the five-plus-minute-long video. He does however, have a quick wardrobe change on the side of the road, putting him in more "appropriate" attire for the "Red Head" Ferrari...

This lack of speech doesn’t mean that the video is less fun to watch. The sound of the 12-cylinder pumping away is all the sound we really need. Enjoy...

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Video: Revisiting Holger Schubert's Ferrari 512 BBi Garage

Video: Revisiting Holger Schubert’s Ferrari 512 BBi Garage

If you’ve been visiting these pages for the past couple of years, you might remember Holger Schubert. If you have a hard time recalling the man, he was the one who decided to build a state-of-the-art garage in his Los Angeles home for his beloved Ferrari 512 BBi.

That was back in 2010. Recently, the boys over at Petrolicious were able to pay a visit to Schubert’s remarkable garage and see for themselves exactly what makes this supposedly simple room such a technological wonder.

We’re not going to spoil a whole lot of the details because the video above does a remarkable job of showing you the garage in all its glory. But to give you an idea, the whole setup comes with a ten-foot-long, fifteen-foot-high bridge that has a hydraulic ramp on one end installed where the 512 BBi can go in and about its business.

And if you’re thinking this was a project everyone can partake in, Schubert actually spent $1.5 million to build the entire thing.

Click past the jump to read about the Ferrari 512 BBi

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Ferrari 512 TR/M gets Cargraphic wheels

Ferrari 512 TR/M gets Cargraphic wheels

The German tuning firm Cargraphic isn’t finished celebrating just yet. In an attempt at updating a classic super car with a new set of wheels, the legentary Ferrari 512 TR from the early ’90s can now continue to roll on into the 21st century with a fresh set of mesh 19 inch wheels that would have made Sonny Crockett jealous. Cargraphic guarantees that their new forged wheels will stand up to the thrashing induced by a high revving 390 HP V12 while the new slender spokes work nicely with the Testa Rossa’s thin slats that make up the classic super car’s wild air intakes. The simple addition of a new set of wheels will go a long way towards updating the Ferrari’s iconic 1980s aerodynamic wedge shaped design.

Press release after the jump.

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1981 - 1984 Ferrari 512 BBi

1981 - 1984 Ferrari 512 BBi

In 1981 at the Frankfurt Motor Show Ferrari replaced the 512 BB model with the 512 BBi, the "i" suffix denoting a change from carburettors to fuel injection.The production period ran from 1981 to 1984, when it was replaced by the world market Testarossa model. During that period a total of 1007 examples were produced, in both in right or left hand drive versions, with no USA market versions built.

The 512 BBi featured a few minor changes to the exterior. At the front the plain aluminium egg-crate radiator grille stopped short of the driving lights, which were now exposed in the grille extremities, with small rectangular parking lights mounted in the bumper section above them. At the rear the engine louvre arrangement was modified and a new shroud was provided to the exhaust system, which incorporated hazard warning lights.

A new design of door mirror was fitted, changes were made to the interior, including a black spoked steering wheel, and the availability of "Zegna" wool cloth seat centers as an option. The road wheels became the same width front and rear, fitted with Michelin TRX tyres, which had the effect of increasing the front and rear track to 1508mm and 1572mm respectively.

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