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2002 - 2006 Ferrari 575M Maranello

2002 - 2006 Ferrari 575M Maranello

Ferrari walks a very fine line with its grand touring models. On the one hand, should they become too soft, there will be talk of the brand being diluted, but make them too hard-edged and they cease to really be a grand tourer and become more of a sports car. During the ’70s and ’80s, Ferrari was sort of doing both of these at the same time. The 2+2 models like the 400 were very soft and more than a little plain to look at, while the two-seat GT cars became mid-engine and much more intimidating just to drive.

So when Ferrari switched back to using a front-engine GT as the flagship model, the 550 was built specifically to be both very fast and very easy to drive. Then in 2002, Ferrari brought out the 575M, an even easier to drive version of the car. But it was still very fast, and the 575M Superamerica was even the fastest convertible in the world at the time. And even if the purists would complain about the available paddle shifter, this is still a front-engine V-12 Ferrari grand tourer, the sort of thing that made the company great in the first place.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 575M Maranello.

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2004 ACAT Global Ferrari 575 by JBR Motorsports

2004 ACAT Global Ferrari 575 by JBR Motorsports

Typically the words “eco-friendly” and “performance” don’t mix together well, but sometimes they pull it off. A great example of a successful attempt is the ACAT Global Ferrari 575 by JBR Motorsports. ACAT Global specializes in making less expensive and lighter catalytic converters, whereas JBR focuses on building bad-ass race cars; a match made in heaven. This modified Ferrari 575 is set to take on one of the largest challenges in the world, and that is to overtake the world land speed record – in the Grand Touring class, of course – at the Bonneville Speed Flats.

JRB and ACAT have been tight lipped about what this Ferrari 575 has behind the rear seats, but we are 100 percent certain that it is a little more than the standard 515-horsepower 5.8-liter V-12 that the stock 575 boasts. Granted, that engine is good, but certainly not enough to beat out the Ferrari record of 232 mph.

The exterior of the Ferrari 575 is draped in a coat of French Blue Ferrari Racing paint with graphics by custom-graphics-extraordinaire, Troy Lee, but the remainder of the exterior modifications are still unknown at this time. We are certain that the Ferrari will boast a lower ride height to help with aerodynamics and a series of diffusers on the rear to help reduce the drag on the rear of the Ferrari.

As we approach the August 11th debut of the Ferrari 575, given it passes its 3-day testing phase, we will learn more about this super-fast Ferrari. We will pass information along to you, as we receive it.

Click past the jump to read the press release regarding its record-setting attempt.

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Customized Ferrari 575M is pure ecstasy

Customized Ferrari 575M is pure ecstasy

The Ferrari 575M went out of production in 2006 after only four years of service, so buying a new model to replace the older one isn’t really an option for any Ferrari fan. Thankfully, a 575M owner has shown us that just because the car isn’t new, doesn’t mean that it can’t sparkle and shine like it just came off of the lot.

The modifications aren’t extensive by any means, but what this Ferrari owner did to renew his ride is cover the exterior of the vehicle in an exquisite white paint, and then add a new set of wheels in a multi-spoke design and painted in black to contrast the body of the car. Take a step back from the 575M and it becomes clear that the front and rear bumper have both been lowered, with a new set of side skirts added to complete the look.

If anyone thought the Ferrari 575M didn’t look good before, then this owner could definitely serve up his ride to prove they are wrong.

Photo Credit: Mike Boldt

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Ferraris invade Monza race track

Ferraris invade Monza race track

If only we could get invited to these exclusive track meets, then we’d be the ones getting videotaped with our fancy Ferraris instead of being the ones watching it from our sofas all while imagining the day when we could get our hands on a Prancing Horse.

That being said, there’s no shame in watching these videos because, well, this is probably as good as it can get for us.

This track video comes courtesy of Marchettino who somehow found himself at
Monza riding with a bunch of Ferrari owners for a nice day of leg stretching around the Italian race track. Watch the video and you’ll notice some of Maranello’s best running around Monza, including a black Ferrari 458 Italia, a Ferrari 599, and what looks to be a Ferrari 575M. Oh and there’s some Ferrari 430s and 360s scattered in the area as well.

If that’s not enough, we get a close-up look of an F430 Scuderia going full blast at 170 mph while producing that unmistakable engine roar to the delight of our speakers.

Not to sound like a jealous man, but…I want one of those!

Admit it, people. You’re all as envious as we are right now.

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2007 Ferrari 575 GTZ by Zagato

2007 Ferrari 575 GTZ by Zagato

Zagato has a long history of coachbuilding that roots all the way back to the late 1910s when Ugo Zagato set up shop in Milan. It wasn’t until 1922 when Zagato built its first body for a Fiat 501. Over the years, the coachbuilder has done coachbuilding for Alfa Romeo, Lancia, Maserati, Jaguar, Aston Martin and there’s even a 1967 Shelby in the long list of models that have been touched by one of the world’s best. In the Early 2000’s the brand was tapped once again, this time by famous car collector, Yoshiyuki Hayashi, who wanted the coachbuilder to create a body for his Ferrari 575M in the style of the famous Ferrari 250GTZ Berlinetta. The end result was the Ferrari 575 GTZ, a model that was produced in just six examples and presented to the world at Villa D’Este Concours D’Elegance, 50 years after the 250GTZ it was modeled after.

Like the 250GTZ, the 575 GTZ featured an all-aluminum body, a two-tone paintwork and 1950’s styling the represents the sports cars of the era. Of course, for Zagato is was the chance to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the 250 GTZ and display even more Italian engineering and style to a world that is increasingly plagued by mass-produced cars with little character or heritage. Needless to say, the 575 GTZ is pretty damn special, so let’s take a look at this rare model and talk a little about it.

Continue reading for our full review

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2005 Ferrari 575M Superamerica

2005 Ferrari 575M Superamerica

By 2005, the Ferrari 575M was getting a little long in the tooth. As it was essentially just an updated version of the 550, the flagship car that replaced the Testarossa had been kicking around for a decade at that point, and it was time for something new. But Ferrari wanted to send the car out in style, as befitted a car that brought back the front-engine Ferrari gran turismo. So a special swan song edition of the car was conceived of and named the Superamerica, a name steeped in history for the carmaker. Of course, there were some issues with the name.

In much the same way that the 599 that would replace the 575M would have a GTO version that wasn’t really a race car, the 575M Superamerica wasn’t really a true Superamerica either. The original America/Superamerica cars of the ’50s and ’60s whole different models. They were built on an existing chassis, but they had new and much more powerful engines and entirely different bodies (sometimes multiple body options) from the production cars they were based on. The 575M Superamerica wasn’t that, but it was still a special car, and the semantics of it should lead you to believe otherwise.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 575M Superamerica.

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