Ferrari 812 Superfast Generations:

2018 Ferrari 812 Superfast

2018 Ferrari 812 Superfast High Resolution Exterior
- image 705884
  • Ferrari 812 Superfast
  • Year:
    2018
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    V12
  • Transmission:
    F1 dual-clutch
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    789 @ 8500
  • Torque @ RPM:
    530 @ 7000
  • Displacement:
    6.5 L
  • 0-60 time:
    2.9 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    211 mph
  • car segment:
  • body style:

The F12berlinetta gets a much needed facelift for 2018

Introduced in 2012 as a replacement for the Ferrari 599, the F12berlinetta harkens back to the 365 GTB/4 "Daytona" and, in many ways, to the iconic 250 GTO and 275 GTB. A full-fledged grand tourer powered by a no-nonsense, naturally aspirated V-12, the F12berlinetta has already spawned many one-off and special-edition models, including the F12 TRS, SP America, F60 America, Carrozzeria Touring Berlinetta Lusso, and more recently the F12tdf. After some five years on the market, the F12 received its mid-cycle facelift ahead of the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. It goes by the name 812 Superfast and comes with many improvements.

Just like the transition from the FF to the GTC4Lusso, the F12berlinetta gained a significant update and a name change. Ferrari didn’t care to explain the meaning behind the new name, but it’s safe to assume that the "812" comes from the engine’s output in PS plus the number of cylinders, while Superfast is just... well... an attempt to be cool in the 21st century. This isn’t the first time a Ferrari appears to have been named by the company’s social media department, as the LaFerrari is just as flamboyant. But it’s worth mentioning that the 812 isn’t the first Superfast in the company’s lineup. The name dates back to 1964, when Ferrari offered the 500 Superfast as the top-of-the-line version of the America model.

Moving over to more important things, Ferrari gave the F12berlinetta a thorough restyling. The grand tourer sports numerous modifications front and rear, while the interior has updated tech, a few nips and tucks, and new seats. More importantly, the 6.3-liter V-12 was redesigned into a new mill that makes the 812 Superfast the quickest and most powerful production Ferrari ever built.

Continue reading to learn more about the new Ferrari F12M.

 

Latest Ferrari 812 Superfast news and reviews:

Drag Race Battle - Ferrari 812 Superfast Versus Tesla Model X P100D

Drag Race Battle - Ferrari 812 Superfast Versus Tesla Model X P100D

Old school takes on the new school!

On paper, an SUV should have no business competing against a supercar in a drag race. But the cars in question, a Ferrari 812 Superfast and a Tesla Model X P100D, aren’t exactly too far apart in the performance category. One produces 588 horsepower and 910 pound-feet of torque, while the other has 790 horsepower and 530 pound-feet of torque on tap. Line them side-by-side on a drag strip and the question of who wins isn’t as ridiculous as it sounds. In the end, such a race took place at the Drag Times home track of Palm Beach International Raceway. As for which car won? Watch the video and find out.

Read more
Top 10 Most Blasphemous Models To Turn Into An EV

Top 10 Most Blasphemous Models To Turn Into An EV

Does battery power make it the spawn of satan?

The world of EVs is ever growing, and as we near a time when there will be no gas to fill our tanks, we realized some of the world’s best-sounding and glorious engines will have to be ditched in favor of electric power. Think of an electric Camaro, Mustang, Corvette, or Lamborghini... does it sound good? Or rather, does it make any sound at all?

With the advent of electrification in the business of car building, you see every major manufacturer scramble to put together a lineup of eco-friendly electric vehicles as a statement of their forward-thinking plans and their bias towards the future of mobility. It all looked foolish almost 20 years ago when Honda introduced the original hybrid Insight, which was shortly followed by Toyota’s Prius, but today, this seems to be the trend that will sell. For some, it might be a marketing ploy to appease a new section of the market, but you can’t dismiss the trend altogether.

Audi just took the wraps off its first fully-electric car, the E-Tron. Mercedes was doing the same just a few weeks ago with its EQC, and just about any manufacturer you can think of has a mid- to long-term plan for at least hybrid, if not electric. For instance, Aston-Martin is looking forward to the year 2030, by which time the British manufacturer’s stable should be made up exclusively of electric cars. Ferrari, well-known for their devotion to making their cars sound perfect, is planning a 60 percent hybridization of its lineup in just four year’s time. You can imagine a Ferrari EV isn’t that far off in the future, then.

All this got us thinking - which cars would you never want to see without a growling V-8, or maybe a high-revving V-12 under the hood? Which car’s move from gas to electric sounds like blasphemy to you? We know there is a Mustang-inspired sports utility vehicle coming from Ford in 2020, and the pony car itself might go electric in the future, so how does that make you feel?

Read on to learn about our top 10 cars that would be blasphemous to turn into EVs.

Read more
2018 Ferrari Monza SP2

2018 Ferrari Monza SP2

It’s the Ferrari 812 with classic styling and seating for two

Ferrari’s shock launch of two brand-new super cars, the Monza SP1 and SP2 put everyone under the pressure of a choice: to go or not go solo. The SP2 is the Barchetta that encourages you to be friendly and take someone with you for the passenger ride of a lifetime aboard the fastest non-hybrid Prancing Horse ever – with no windshield!

The Icona line of special, limited run cars is off to a scorching start with two new beauties dubbed the SP1 and the SP2 Monza. The name isn’t new; instead, just like the cars, it draws from Ferrari’s long and storied racing heritage. The Monza was one of Ferrari’s Barchetta-style sports racing cars from the ‘50s which had its successes on the track but faded into obscurity in the decades that followed. It’s nice to see Ferrari bringing back this nameplate, especially on such eye-wateringly beautiful cars.

It’s good to know that the Icona program is set to run for at least four years, so we’re certain we’ll see more amazing products coming their way considering Louis Camilleri assertion that Ferrari looks to debut up to 15 new cars in the following years. The scope is to increase the sales to $5,000,000,000 by 2022 which would be a 68% increase from the figure registered at the end of last year.

While we’re almost sure that some of those sales will come off of the launch of Ferrari’s much-rumored SUVs, we’ve got to live in the moment and enjoy the Monza SP1 and SP2 for what they are: Ferrari’s fastest non-hybrid cars. The fact that they follow the old norm of a front-mounted V-12 sending the power to the back wheels is just the cream atop an amazing pie.

Read more
2018 Ferrari Monza SP1

2018 Ferrari Monza SP1

A modern Ferrari car with a classic twist

Ferrari shocks everyone again and launches two open-top sports cars for the road as part of a new program called Icona. They are the Monza SP1 and SP2; they look like bonkers re-imagined ‘50s racers, and will be made in very limited quantities – all of which have been already sold.

Just as I was lamenting the other day about the disappearance of coachbuilding, Ferrari decides to get up and unveil a whole new line of cars under the Icona moniker. We know about Ferrari’s Special Projects program that builds one-off models, sometimes starting from a clean piece of paper, for Maranello’s most-trusted and respected buyers. The cars that will come through the Icona program won’t be one-offs, but you still won’t see more than 200 made of each. That’s, apparently, how many new Monzas they will build and, despite a $1,400,000 price tag, all have been sold. Indeed, it’s a cheap price to ask considering a one-off Ferrari – for which all slots have been reserved all the way until 2021 – starts at about $3,000,000.

With the occasion of Ferrari’s Capital Markets Day, the Italian automaker debuted the Icona program on the premises of its new Centro Stile facility in Maranello. The program, which is slated to run until 2022 for the very least, will see more cars built using the same recipe: design philosophy that harkens back to the old days in combination with the latest Ferrari underpinnings.

Read more
Ferrari Drops a Pair of Bombshell Speedsters at Maranello Unveiling

Ferrari Drops a Pair of Bombshell Speedsters at Maranello Unveiling

The two stunners are called the Monza SP1 and the Monza SP2

Reports of Ferrari’s plan to unleash a number of special edition Ferraris came through in a big way with the recent unveilings of the Monza SP1 and Monza SP2 Speedsters. The launch of the two Ferrari 812-based speedsters took place at a price event dedicated to Ferrari customers. The two cars haven’t been made public, but reports from those who attended the event have taken to social media to show the parts of the two special edition Ferraris.

Read more
Three Special Edition Versions of The Ferrari 812 Superfast Could Be Arriving Soon

Three Special Edition Versions of The Ferrari 812 Superfast Could Be Arriving Soon

One of these models is debuting on September 17

Rumors are swirling that the Ferrari 812 Superfast is getting three special edition alter-egos, including one that’s reportedly going to make its debut sometime next week. Details are still cloudy, but multiple users from Ferrari owners’ forum Ferrari Chat have confirmed the rumor, including one user who claims that the three 812 Superfast-based special edition models include a hardcore “812 Monza,” an “812 Aperta” with a removable Targa roof panel, and an unidentified 812 “speedster” that will have no roof and a tiny windshield. One of these three special editions will make its debut on September 17.

Read more
The Aston Martin DBS Superleggera vs the Ferrari 812 Superfast vs the Bentley Continental GT

The Aston Martin DBS Superleggera vs the Ferrari 812 Superfast vs the Bentley Continental GT

It is a well-known fact at this point that the latest Aston Martin DBS Superleggera will go after the Ferrari 812 Superfast. Even Aston Martin officials implied this. However, I am fairly certain that in terms of poise, speed, technology, and price, the Bentley Continental GT may be thrown in the same ring in an endless fight for prestige among super luxury GTs. Sure, the coupe from Crewe isn’t as hardcore as the machines from Gaydon and Maranello, but the Continental GT will gain even more spirited versions in the future. Some of them will definitely take aim at the buyers of the DBS or the 812. The Supersports, I am looking at you.

For now, let’s see how the Aston Martin DBS Superleggera, the Ferrari 812 Superfast, and the Bentley Continental GT stack up against one another.

Read more
Wallpaper of the Day 2018 Ferrari 812 Superfast

Wallpaper of the Day 2018 Ferrari 812 Superfast

2018 Ferrari 812 Superfast
Read our full review of the 2018 Ferrari 812 Superfast or check out the gallery below for more wallpaper options!

Read more
Would You Pay $380,000 For A Ferrari Wind Tunnel Model?

Would You Pay $380,000 For A Ferrari Wind Tunnel Model?

It’s more expensive than an actual Ferrari 812 Superfast

The Ferrari 812 Superfast is super cool, super powerful, and super expensive. It’s priced from $335,275, which is more than an arm and a leg for most of us. But if you have the money to do it, why not spend on a Ferrari 812 Superfast with no engine, no drivetrain, and no steering wheel for a price that’s higher than the actual car itself. It’s strange times we’re living in, right?

Don’t think this is a joke either because this is completely legitimate. The 812 Superfast in question isn’t even an actual car; it’s a scale model finished in hand-sculpted carbon fiber that also includes materials described only as “prototypes.” The 1:2 scale model was sculpted by noted designer Ignacio Albera and was used by Ferrari throughout the development process of the 812 Superfast, including gathering the results of computational fluid dynamics that were done inside the wind tunnel. Adding to the appeal of the model is the fact that it’s maintained its original modularity since it went through the ringer. Should this model be of interest to you, RM Sotheby’s will be selling it during its Leggenda E Passione sale on September 9 at Ferrari’s own headquarters in Modena, Italy. Bring those checkbooks if you end up going because early estimates for the car say it could sell for as much as $380,000, more than $40,000 higher than what you’ll pay for an actual 812 Superfast.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

Read more
Drivetribe Reviews The Ferrari 812 Superfast: Video

Drivetribe Reviews The Ferrari 812 Superfast: Video

Sure, it’s quick, but do you need a pro license to drive it?

The Ferrari 812 Superfast is the Prancing Horse’s latest Grand Tourer berlinetta, offering a front-mid-engine, RWD layout, sharp and modern styling, and a sonorous 12-cylinder soundtrack. It’s an amalgamation of new and old, bringing loads of cutting-edge go-fast technology, but with the heart of soul of a true Maranello machine. On paper, it looks impressive, but how do all those numbers translate onto the road? To find out, Drivetribe’s Jethro Bovingdon took one out onto the winding switchbacks of some Italian back road and gave it a boot full in this eight minute, 20 second video.

The result, as you might expect, is quite good. Bovingdon seems enthralled behind the wheel, praising the 812 Superfast in a pleasing British lilt. The big take away is just how easy the Ferrari is to drive, offering loads of grip and a surprising amount of control. “Compared to an F12 tdf… it’s a bit of a pussycat,” Bovingdon comments, later adding, “There’s so much more control than the F12, and you simply trust it so much more than the spikey, all-around evil tdf.” The whole video touts Drivetribe’s typical high production value, and is a real joy to watch. Bovingdon puts the hammer down without mercy, sliding the high-dollar Ferrari on real-world roads and showboating in ass-out, smoke-up drifts. Read on for further details, or just hit play and watch it for yourself.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
2019 Ferrari 812 Aperta

2019 Ferrari 812 Aperta

The 812 Superfast would make a great roadster!

After five years on the market, the already iconic Ferrari F12berlinetta received its mid-cycle facelift in 2017. A comprehensive update with a fully redesigned exterior, the facelifted F12 also changed its name to the 812 Superfast and gained a larger V-12 engine with more oomph. Ready to hit dealerships for the 2018 model year, the new 812 Superfast looks like a solid base for a good looking and fast convertible. But will Ferrari build it?

That’s still up for debate, as Maranello has yet to say anything about chopping the roof off the 812 Superfast. Adding to this is the fact that the F12berlinetta was a coupe only in standard production form, but Ferrari did make a few convertibles, including the one-off F12 TRS and the F60 America. So, it’s not entirely unfeasible that we’ll see an 812 Aperta in the future but, if we do, it’ll be in very limited numbers. Until that happens, we created a rendering of the car to go with the speculative review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 812 Aperta.

Read more
2018 Ferrari 812 Superfast

2018 Ferrari 812 Superfast

The F12berlinetta gets a much needed facelift for 2018

Introduced in 2012 as a replacement for the Ferrari 599, the F12berlinetta harkens back to the 365 GTB/4 "Daytona" and, in many ways, to the iconic 250 GTO and 275 GTB. A full-fledged grand tourer powered by a no-nonsense, naturally aspirated V-12, the F12berlinetta has already spawned many one-off and special-edition models, including the F12 TRS, SP America, F60 America, Carrozzeria Touring Berlinetta Lusso, and more recently the F12tdf. After some five years on the market, the F12 received its mid-cycle facelift ahead of the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. It goes by the name 812 Superfast and comes with many improvements.

Just like the transition from the FF to the GTC4Lusso, the F12berlinetta gained a significant update and a name change. Ferrari didn’t care to explain the meaning behind the new name, but it’s safe to assume that the "812" comes from the engine’s output in PS plus the number of cylinders, while Superfast is just... well... an attempt to be cool in the 21st century. This isn’t the first time a Ferrari appears to have been named by the company’s social media department, as the LaFerrari is just as flamboyant. But it’s worth mentioning that the 812 isn’t the first Superfast in the company’s lineup. The name dates back to 1964, when Ferrari offered the 500 Superfast as the top-of-the-line version of the America model.

Moving over to more important things, Ferrari gave the F12berlinetta a thorough restyling. The grand tourer sports numerous modifications front and rear, while the interior has updated tech, a few nips and tucks, and new seats. More importantly, the 6.3-liter V-12 was redesigned into a new mill that makes the 812 Superfast the quickest and most powerful production Ferrari ever built.

Continue reading to learn more about the new Ferrari F12M.

Read more
The Ferrari 812 Superfast Looks Like A Mix Of Modern Go-Fast Tech And Traditional Maranello Attitude

The Ferrari 812 Superfast Looks Like A Mix Of Modern Go-Fast Tech And Traditional Maranello Attitude

What does the 812 Superfast tell us about the company’s direction?

Ferrari is most definitely a company that’s very set in its ways. One good example of this comes from the company’s founder, Enzo Ferrari, who was famously quoted as saying “aerodynamics are for people who can’t build engines.” Of course, as we all know, aero is now a crucial element of any modern Prancing Horse, but the point is this – Ferrari doesn’t change unless it’s forced to. Usually, it’s a faster on-track rival that forces the change from the win-or-nothing Ferrari, but sometimes, it’s market pressures that dictate some degree of adaptation. But even when (or perhaps “if” would be more accurate) the Italian marque concedes to change, it still zealously defends that original kernel of what a Ferrari is “supposed” to be. The latest example of this is the 812 Superfast, which just debuted at the Geneva International Motor Show sporting a mix of the new and the traditional, offering us a cocktail of all that old-school magic, but in a thoroughly updated glass.

Not that you’d know it from a single glance at the press photos and spec sheet. The exterior is sharp and decked-out in adaptive aerodynamics, while the engine is the most powerful lump ever added to a road-going production Ferrari. Not only that, but the top speed is rated at over 211 mph, which means it’s also the fastest road-going mass-production Ferrari ever built.

But if you look past the numbers, you’ll find the past rearing its head again and again...

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more