1969 - 1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GT

1969 - 1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GT Exterior
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An icon from Maranello

Throughout its history, Ferrari has made cars for a variety of reasons – to win races, to outdo its competitors, or to simply show off. The Dino, however, is unique. Named after Enzo Ferrari’s son, Alfredo “Dino” Ferrari, who died in 1956 due to muscular dystrophy at the age of 24, the Dino is part tribute and part experiment, marking a variety of firsts for the famed Italian sports car maker. However, for the first eight years it was in production, the Dino was separated from the core Ferrari brand, offering a lower entry fee paired with a V-6 (and later, V-8) engine mounted in the middle.

Arguably one of greatest (if not the greatest motivation) behind the Dino’s creation was Ferrari’s ambition to make something that could take on the venerable Porsche 911. While the Prancing Horse’s V-12 models were faster overall, they were also significantly more expensive, so the Dino was put forth as a way of pulling in customers looking for an alternative to Stuttgart’s darling.

The result of all these pressures is unquestionably one of the greatest Ferrari models of all time – even though it’s not really a Ferrari.

Continue reading to learn more about the Dino.

 

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The 10 Best Ferraris Of All Time

The 10 Best Ferraris Of All Time

From classics to current exotics, Maranello has a long and rich history of performance car excellence

Picking the ten best Ferraris of all time is not an easy exercise, but somebody had to do it. Sports cars don’t come finer than those with a Prancing Horse badge, and in the 70 years that it has been around, Ferrari has built some of the finest and most desirable performance cars in the history of the industry. A lot of Ferrari models have climbed the ladder to iconic status, and even some of today’s models are on their way there, too. It took a lot of work — and arguments — but we managed to narrow down our choices for the ten best Ferraris of all time.

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Petrolicious Features the Ultimate Ferrari Dino: Video

Petrolicious Features the Ultimate Ferrari Dino: Video

Classic lines, heart of an F40

Ferrari Dino 246 GTWe’re still buzzing from all the craziness that was Monterey Car Week 2018, from the parties, to the auctions, to the racing, to the always-awesome Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. It’s all pretty overwhelming, to be honest. Pretty much anywhere you go in Monterey during Car Week, you’ll find high-end machinery that elicits a sense of lust and admiration - and this 1972 Ferrari Dino is no different. Making the scene last week at The Quail, A Motorsports Gathering, this black Italian icon is called the Monza 3.6 Evo, and it’s unlike any Dino you’ve ever seen.

Created by well-known Ferrari collector David Lee, the Monza 3.6 Evo is an amalgamation of new and old, combining a classic Dino body with a slew of upgrades that take it a whole new level. Mounted just behind the cabin, the Evo draws its power from a Ferrari F40 block that’s naturally aspirated and bored to 3.6 liters. Put your foot down, and this thing emits a truly jaw-dropping sound. Outside, the gorgeous Dino body was also upgraded, this time with plus-sized wheels and reshaped fenders that give it a unique, yet understated factory-style aesthetic.

Put these things together with upgraded suspension bits, new brakes, and other high-end goodies, and the result will have you floored, guaranteed.

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1968 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

1968 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

Maranello’s answer to the Porsche 911

In 1968, Ferrari had been on the market as a road car manufacturer for 21 years and was already enjoying massive success. It had already won the Formula One championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans and launched iconic cars like the 250 GTO, 275 GTB, and the 400 Superamerica. However, the cars were very expensive, and Ferrari was looking for a shot at the more affordable sports car market. And it created the Dino for this exact purpose.

Launched in 1968, the first Dino was called the 206 GT. Powered by a 2.0-liter V-6, it was designed by Pininfarina’s Leonardo Fioravanti and produced until 1969. The Dino was updated in 1969 and renamed the 246 GT. A convertible model called the GTS was also introduced. The original Dino was phased out in 1974, but a redesigned model called the 308 GT4 was launched in 1973 and kept into production until 1980. That’s when the Dino brand was dropped altogether, and Ferrari’s next affordable sports car was called the Mondial.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Dino 206 GT.

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Amazing 1966 Ferrari Dino Berlinetta Prototype Heading to Pebble Beach Auction

Amazing 1966 Ferrari Dino Berlinetta Prototype Heading to Pebble Beach Auction

Ferrari collectors better need to have their checkbooks ready

Look at the list of the most expensive cars ever sold at an auction and at least three-fourths of the cars on that list are Ferraris. That’s important to know because another classic Ferrari is about to join its peers on that list. A 1966 Ferrari Dino Berlinetta GT is headed to the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it will be auctioned off by Gooding and Company on August 24. The classic Ferrari is estimated to fetch between $2 million to $3 million, though given how much other classic Ferraris have gone for in recent auctions, that estimate could turn out to be conservative relative to our expectations.

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Ferrari Celebrates 50 Years of Dino

Ferrari Celebrates 50 Years of Dino

The iconic V-6 model is half a century old

The iconic Ferrari Dino is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2018, and the Maranello-based company marked the occasion with a special event in its hometown. More than 150 Dinos and over 300 customers from all over the world attended the celebration.

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Ferrari Still Hesitant On Bringing Dino Name Back

Ferrari Still Hesitant On Bringing Dino Name Back

There will be a reckoning for Ferrari’s future at some point

I guess we shouldn’t be surprised why Ferrari lost the “Testarossa” name after all. In somewhat similar circumstances, the Italian automaker has another nameplate that it hasn’t used for quite some time, and the internal debate on possibly bringing said name back shows that not everyone in Ferrari is keen on using past names, no matter how popular or nostalgic they may be. I am, of course, referring to the “Dino,” which has been in numerous rumors in recent years for one reason or another, including the thought of bringing the name back for an entry-level model that will slot below the California T.

It’s worth noting though that rumors about a Dino revival have been going on for the better part of the last decade. These aren’t new whispers we’re hearing because the return of the Dino nameplate has been bubbling in the surface of rumor mills since 2008 when it was believed that the model would make its debut at the Geneva Motor Show, and then later at the Frankfurt Motor Show. Nothing came out of it, and subsequent rumors in 2012 and 2015 amounted to nada either. Fast forward to 2017 and there’s still a lot of debate about what to do with the name. Ferrari CEO Sergio Marchionne isn’t too keen on the idea of seeing a “new” Dino because he believes it might have a negative impact on the brand’s image. His sentiments are reportedly echoed by some within Maranello, but there are also others who are in favor of dusting off the name because of its nostalgic ties to Ferrari. Either way, a decision is expected to come when Ferrari lays out its next five-year plan, which could take place in the first quarter of 2018.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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Is This The Long Rumored Ferrari Dino We've All Been Waiting For?

Is This The Long Rumored Ferrari Dino We’ve All Been Waiting For?

If so, the new Dino could hit the market before the turn of the decade!!!

Back in the late 1960s, Ferrari decided it wanted to create an “affordable” lineup of vehicles, ones that would be able to take on vehicles like the Porsche 911, and the Dino name – which honored Alfredo “Dino” Ferrari – was born. The idea was that the Dino name would be used on non-V-12-powered vehicles, while the V-12 models would continue under the Ferrari name. Between 1968 and 1976, Ferrari launched a few different “Dino” models, including the Dino 206 GT, Dino 246 GT and GTS, and the Dino 308 GT4 2+2. In 1976, the Dino name was discontinued in favor of the Ferrari name. More recently rumors have been flying that the Dino would make a return, and in mid-2015, Sergio Marchionne even stated that Ferrari would bring back the nameplate – it wasn’t a question of if, but when. It’s been a long time coming, and we’ve seen what looked to be a 458-mule testing back in late 2015, but since then the trail has gone cold. Until this morning, that is, when we received a new set of spy shots that could very well be the V-6 powered Dino the world has been waiting for.

Like the mule we saw in late 2015, this mule is also based on the 458, but it’s sporting a cue or two that hint at this being the real McCoy. As such, the pictures you see here could very well be the proof we’ve been waiting for. Is the Dino program back on track after going cold more than a year ago? Well, keep reading to learn more about it.

Continue reading for the full story.

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2016 Mecum Auction Indianapolis – Recap

2016 Mecum Auction Indianapolis – Recap

Shelby cars dominated in Indianapolis with two seven-figure examples at the top of the list

The History of Mecum Auctions goes back to 1988 at the Rockford Airport, where the first Mecum Auction was held. Over the last 28 years, Mecum has grown tremendously, now being ranked No. 1 in the U.S. for collector cars offered at auction, collector cars sold at auction, total dollar volume of sales, and the largest number of auction venues. On top of that, it has become the host of the world’s largest collector car auction that is hosted every year in Florida.

This last week, Mecum hosted an auction in Indianapolis, Indiana at the Indiana State Fairgrounds. This year there was a total of 1,859 lots that included plenty of collector cars, a few gas pumps, some neon signs, and even a few coin-operated kid rides. The big news from this auction, however, was the pair of Shelby Cobras that broke seven digits before the hammer dropped and a few other classics that are well worth taking an extra look at.

We’ve taken the time to cover the biggest sellers from the auction as well as a few of those that didn’t sell at all. There was even a 1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda Pro Stock that got as high as $750,000 but didn’t get quite high enough to cross that thin reserve line. That was just one of many that didn’t sell, and those two Shelby Cobras weren’t the only models that found new owners last week. So, let’s take a look at a few of the most notable vehicles that went under the hammer last week.

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Top Ferrari Exec Strongly Hints The Arrival Of A Fifth Model

Top Ferrari Exec Strongly Hints The Arrival Of A Fifth Model

Could the Ferrari Dino finally be making its long-awaited comeback?

Ferrari appears to be closer than ever to bringing back the Dino nameplate after the automaker’s Far East Hub CEO, Dieter Knechtel, essentially let the cat out of the bag during an appearance at the Australian Grand Prix. Speaking with The Motor Report, Knechtel all but confirmed Ferrari’s plan to offer “another model after the California in the GT segment.”

That was actually Knechtel’s exact quote, which is as strong an indication as anything Maranello has said in the past about the status of a new model that would line up beside the California T as a co-entry-level model, for a lack of a better term. Until now, Ferrari has been coy about the supposedly new sports car but Knechtel’s comments does open the door for all the speculation surrounding the Dino’s return.

Granted, Knechtel didn’t exactly drop a bomb of sorts in actually confirming the new model, but given Ferrari’s recent acceptance of downsized engines and its new-found willingness to use turbochargers in order to abide by stricter emissions regulations, a go-between GT model makes a lot of sense.

What’s still unclear is where this model will sit. Some have said that it would depose the California T as Ferrari’s entry-level model. Reports that it would use a turbocharged V-6 engine back that up since the California already utilizes a turbo V-8 that pumps out 550 horsepower. On the flip side, there are also whispers that the model would actually slot in between the 550-horsepower California T and the 660-horsepower 488 GTB. Either way, both scenarios give Ferrari another “affordable” model to balance out its entire lineup.

Expect to hear more about the status of this “will they or won’t they” Ferrari soon. Everybody seems to have an opinion on it now, including those within Maranello’s brain trust.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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Collection Of Eight Ferraris Worth More Than $11 Million Heading To Auction

Collection Of Eight Ferraris Worth More Than $11 Million Heading To Auction

Collecting classic vehicles is quite an expensive hobby if you fancy exotic sports cars, but nothing can drain your multi-million-dollar bank account quicker than a Ferrari collection. As a renowned Ferrari collector and long-time customer, Tony Shooshani knows this better than anyone else, having amassed a Prancing Horse stable that includes some of the rarest models ever built. After years of buying them, Shooshani has now decided to part with eight of his Ferraris, all of which will be auctioned by Gooding & Company at its annual two-day Scottsdale Auctions between January 29-30, 2016.

If you were planning to start your own Ferrari collection, now is as good a time as any. Given you have at least $11 million to spare, that is!

The lot includes some of finest Ferrari supercars ever produced, as well as a couple of classic entry-level models that can still be had for less than one million bucks. The most expensive units are a 1995 F50 and a 2003 Enzo, which are estimated to fetch more than $2.5 million each. There is also a 1990 F40 that Gooding & Company estimates will fetch between $1.3 and 1.6 million.

Classic models include a 250 GT Cabriolet and a 250 GT Lusso, which, not surprisingly, are likely to change owners for more than $2 million. At the more affordable end of the list, there’s a 1969 Dino 206 GT ($700,000-$800,000), a 1984 512 BBi ($400,000-$475,000), and a 1988 328 GTS ($125,000-$150,000).

All told, the estimated value of the entire lot sits between $11.6 and $13.5 million. That’s a lot of dough if you’re not familiar with how much classic Ferraris fetch nowadays, but not that much considering that a 250 GTO can change owners for as much as $50 million.

Continue reading for the full story.

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2018 Ferrari Dino

2018 Ferrari Dino

The Dino brand, created by Ferrari for models with engines with fewer than 12 cylinders, spanned from 1968 to 1976, and included cars such as the iconic 246 GTS. Now it looks like Ferrari is going to resurrect the name for an entry-level sports car. Rumors about Ferrari planning to develop a V-6-powered sports car have been flying around for some years now. It took Maranello a lot to admit such a model is underway, but Sergio Marchionne finally came clean in June 2015, telling Autocar that a V-6 Ferrari is "not a question of if but when." Two months have passed since then and our spy photographers caught a 458-based mule in the wild. According to them, the car didn’t sound like the usual V-8. What’s more, the mule was followed by a 488 that didn’t sound like it was using a turbocharged V-8 either, but rather the turbo V-6 used in the newly revealed 2016 Alfa Romeo Giulia QV.

Could this mean that Ferrari is finally testing the sports car that will revive the Dino nameplate? This seems to be the likely scenario, especially since the 458 mule sports a number of features hinting toward a new exterior design and a different powerplant.

Of course, we’re nearly three years away from seeing the real deal in the metal and it will probably take at least 12 months until we get to see a pre-production body on that mule, but that won’t stop me from speculating what this Ferrari might bring to the market. Keep reading for the full details.

Updated 10/01/2015: According to AutoCar, Ferrari just filled patents for its upcoming V6-powered Dino sports car. The new drawings reveal that the 2018 Dino will be a "convertible car with a rigid sunroof and a front engine." So apparently, the upcoming Dino will feature a retractable roof - just like the 488 Spider and will get the same 3.0-litre V-6 engine used in the Alfa Giulia.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2018 Ferrari Dino.

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Ferrari Dino Will Return As V6-Powered Sports Car

Ferrari Dino Will Return As V6-Powered Sports Car

This one might be a little difficult for some people to accept. Ferrari chairman Sergio Marchionne has stated in no uncertain terms that Ferrari would be bringing back the Dino nameplate, complete with a V6 engine. Ferrari has obviously done this before, but this time the car won’t be a sub-brand, this will be a full-on Ferrari with prancing-horse badges and everything. Marchionne has also stressed that this was not a move to greatly expand production or introduce a new price point. The engine is likely to be a relatively small one, breathing with the aid of a pair of turbochargers.

Marchionne hinted at this being a 500 horsepower car, from which we can draw a few conclusions. That’s the same amount of power as a 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS, and with previous incarnations of the Dino having been small, mid-engined sports cars, it seems likely that the new Dino will be aimed at higher-performance versions of the 911 (much as the original was), as well as the Mercedes-Benz AMG GT. Whether the Ferrari will be built to convert so easily into a track machine isn’t something we know yet, and will probably come down to whether Ferrari is willing to risk being shown up by a Porsche on the track.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Video: 1975 Ferrari Dino 308 GT4 Tribute

Video: 1975 Ferrari Dino 308 GT4 Tribute

There’s been a lot of talk about Ferrari’s rumored plans to introduce a V-6-powered, entry-level sports car in the near future. It may sound awkward given the company’s tradition with V-8 and V-12 powerplants, but the Italians have done this before. It happened between 1968 and 1976, when Ferrari launched the Dino marque for models powered by engines with fewer than 12 cylinders. Once called the "lesser Ferraris," the Dinos carried 2.0- and 2.4-liter, V-6 units, as well as a 3.0-liter V-8 under their rear bonnets. The most iconic Dino was the 246 GTS, but the 308 GT4 received some attention as well.

Produced for eight years — four with a Dino badge and four as a Ferrari — the 308 GT4 featured a 2+2 coupe body and a wedge design penned by Bertone. The 3.0-liter eight-banger generated 250 horsepower at launch, but the engine lost 20 ponies when it crossed the pond to America due to slight modifications. Weighing in at about 2,500 pounds, the 308 GT4 wasn’t astoundingly fast, but it was quick enough for Elvis Presley to buy one. It’s actually one of the last car he purchased nearly a year before passing away in 1977.

40 years have passed since its official launch, and the 308 GT4 is finally getting the love it deserves from Ferrari aficionados as the company’s first production car to feature a mid-mounted, V-8 engine. Hit the play button above to watch a happy owner talk about his 1975 Dino-badged sports car in an enchanting Gear Patrol video.

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1966 Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyder by Carrozzeria Sports Cars

1966 Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyder by Carrozzeria Sports Cars

While most of us are still waiting for Ferrari to bring back the legendary Dino name, the classic version is still breaking hearts. One of the only 18 Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyders to be produced has been auctioned by RM Auctions in Monaco for an amazing €2,520,000, or about $3,155,000 at the current exchange rates.

The Ferrari Dino 206 S was unveiled in February 1966 and was aimed to race the FIA’s 2-liter Group 4 class against the most powerful of Porsche models. The Dino was up for the task using a 65 degree V-6 engine that had been conceived by Dino Ferrari himself.

Shortly after its debut, the Dino 206 S proved what an amazing car it really was: it earned a 2nd place finish at the Targo Florio, 2nd and 3rd at the Nurburgring, and a 6th place finish at Spa. Then, in June 1967 with Richard Attwood and David Piper behind the wheel, it scored another impressive result, this time in the 1,000 Kilometer Nurburgring race: 6th place overall and 1st in class.

Hit the jump to read more about the Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyder by Carrozzeria Sports Cars.

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Breaking: New Ferrari Dino to be launched in Paris

Breaking: New Ferrari Dino to be launched in Paris

2012 will be a pretty busy year for Ferrari. After the F12berlinetta and the new Enzo replacement, the company will take a little break from developing V12 supercars and will focus on offering the long rumored successor for the legendary Dino instead.

In the past few years, Ferrari has been up and down when asked about a new Dino, but now Ferrari sources have confirmed to us that a new Dino is currently being developed and that it will be unveiled this fall at the Paris Auto Show, with the production to follow in early 2013 - as a celebration of the car’s 45th anniversary.

The new Dino will be the smallest model in Ferrari’s line-up and will be powered by a detuned version of the V8 engine used in the 458 Italia. This means we’ll see a total output somewhere in the 450 HP area. As for its exterior design, expect to see the classic Dino brought to our modern days: it will combine elements from the latest 458 Italia, FF, and F12berlinetta and will still offer a 2+2 seats configuration. The best part is that the car’s legendary nose will remain, but will look a bit modernized.

As for the car’s price, our sources have confirmed that the new Dino will be the cheapest model in the line-up, but you’ll still have to dish out about $200K if you want to own one.

UPDATE 04/02/2012: In case you hadn’t realized it yet, April Fool’s!! This information is 100% false and was created for our amusement on this wonderful day!

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1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino Replica: Real Enough for My Dollar

1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino Replica: Real Enough for My Dollar

The 1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino is one of the rarest cars in the world, as Ferrari only built a total of 18 of these sweet machines. Well, the rarer the car, the more likely enthusiasts are to start replicating them, so seeing a replica of this famous car is to be expected. However, a high-quality replica is much less common.

A recent beauty popped up on eBay and it is likely one of the best recreations of a classic Ferrari we have ever seen. This replica 1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino is about as close to 100% perfect as you can get. It has a custom-built alloy body with a 1,987 cc V-6 engine from a Ferrari Dino 206 GT. It may not crank out the 215 horsepower that the 206 SP’s 1,999 cc engine cranked, but the Dino 206 GT’s engine was rated at a respectable 176 horsepower (1967 model year). Driving this mid-mounted engine’s power to the rear wheels is a magnesium gearbox, which is likely a five-speed configuration.

Being the party poopers that we are, we had to examine this replica closely and see what differences we could find between it and the original. The first thing that stands out is the parked positioning of the wiper blade. The replica’s wiper blade is parked on the driver’s side of the vehicle. On the original, the wiper blade parks almost in the middle of the windshield.

The second thing is that the cutout in front of the windshield is several inches too close to the windshield. The original 206 SP Dino’s cutout is at least 8 inches from the windshield and the replica’s cutout is about 3 inches from the windshield.

Lastly, the driver’s side window frame on the original is unpainted, whereas the replica’s is painted red. All of that said, for a starting bid of “only” $89,100, this is not a bad deal, given an original 206 SP Dino fetched $3,267,000 at an auction in 2007.

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1969 - 1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GT

1969 - 1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GT

An icon from Maranello

Throughout its history, Ferrari has made cars for a variety of reasons – to win races, to outdo its competitors, or to simply show off. The Dino, however, is unique. Named after Enzo Ferrari’s son, Alfredo “Dino” Ferrari, who died in 1956 due to muscular dystrophy at the age of 24, the Dino is part tribute and part experiment, marking a variety of firsts for the famed Italian sports car maker. However, for the first eight years it was in production, the Dino was separated from the core Ferrari brand, offering a lower entry fee paired with a V-6 (and later, V-8) engine mounted in the middle.

Arguably one of greatest (if not the greatest motivation) behind the Dino’s creation was Ferrari’s ambition to make something that could take on the venerable Porsche 911. While the Prancing Horse’s V-12 models were faster overall, they were also significantly more expensive, so the Dino was put forth as a way of pulling in customers looking for an alternative to Stuttgart’s darling.

The result of all these pressures is unquestionably one of the greatest Ferrari models of all time – even though it’s not really a Ferrari.

Continue reading to learn more about the Dino.

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1972 - 1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GTS

1972 - 1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GTS

Topless thrills for an Italian icon

When it was first built, the rear/mid-engine Dino sports car promised the same thrilling experience behind the wheel as any other machine with a Prancing Horse badge on the nose, but for a significantly lower price of admission. By the time the Dino 246 GT rolled out of Maranello, it was more than obvious that that mission was a complete and utter success. As such, a roofless iteration was quickly drafted up, and thus, the Dino 246 GTS was born. All the important bits, like the 2.4-liter V-6, independent suspension, and drop-dead gorgeous styling remained unaltered, but up top, you could find an additional 300 miles of blue-sky goodness.

These days, the Dino is one of the most sought-after Ferrari models on the planet, with some examples of the 246 GTS easily breaking the half-million dollar mark. The car is a wonderful thing to behold, and stands as a critical milestone in Ferrari’s long history.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Dino 246 GTS.

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1973 - 1980 Ferrari Dino 308 GT4

1973 - 1980 Ferrari Dino 308 GT4

With the huge success of the Dino 246 GT/GTS, Ferrari also decided to bring a 2+2 version of the car. And in 1972 at the Paris Motor Show Ferrari unveiled the 308 GT4 model. It was Ferrari’s first V-8 production model, and also the first mid-engined 2+2 model.

The 308 GT4 models were given chassis numbers in the particular Dino even number series, which they maintained even when being produced alongside the true 246 GT/GTS replacement, the 308 GTB/GTS series, which had chassis numbers in the standard Ferrari road car odd-number sequence. The production period lasted for seven years, until 1980, when it was superseded by the Mondial 8 model.

The car was designed by Bertone and featured a controversial styling at first, due to its angular lines, like the boomerang shaped air intakes on the sail panels that bordered the rear quarter glass, and the tunnel effect of the inner sail panels to the flat vertical rear screen. The left side intake ducted cooling air to the oil radiator, and the right side one ducted air to the carburettor air filter. The overall shape was very tight and well balanced, and has stood the test of time very well, certainly better than some of its contemporaries.

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1975 - 1980 Ferrari Dino 208 GT4

1975 - 1980 Ferrari Dino 208 GT4

The Ferrari Dino 208 GT4 is the smaller version of the 308 GT4 that was revealed at the 1973 Paris Auto Salon. The Ferrari was specially designed for the Italian market, because in those days taxation was particularly heavy on cars with engines above 2 liters, and remained in production from 1975 to 1980, with a total of 840 units receiving Maranello’s stamp of approval.

As this was a specific market model for the Italian market, all were produced with a left hand drive configuration. Just like most Ferraris that came before in the Dino lineup, the numbers in the car’s name refer to the engine’s total cubic capacity as well as the number of cylinders, in this case the Dino is powered by a 2.0 Liter V8, with the figure 4 relating to the Dino’s 2+2 layout offering space for up to four passengers.

Continued after the jump.

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New Ferrari spied again - 599 Spider? Dino?

New Ferrari spied again - 599 Spider? Dino?

Last month we got a spy shot of a possible Ferrari 599 Spider that was spotted last summer. Now it seems that car is still alive and out for testing in this new spy shot.

This is proof that Ferrari is working on something new, but is it a 599? maybe the rumored but unseen Dino? What is known is that Ferrari has got something new on its hands, and it’s keeping this car a secret.

The car in this shot has a 599 GTB Fiorano body, but there are some subtle differences. There is a cut in the roofline at the A-pillar possibly for a convertible top (or maybe even targa roof or a sliding glass roof like the Superamerica.) The 599 double C-pillar could also mask the shape of a modified roofline.

Depending on what is being tested here could mean two very different sports cars. If this is a 599, then it would likely come with the car’s 200+ mph V12 engine. If this is a Dino, it the engine could have as little as half of the cylinders as the 599. When Enzo Ferrari came out with the first Dino in the late 1960s (as it’s own brand named after his dead son,) it had six cylinders. At the time, Enzo declared that all Ferraris with fewer than twelve cylinders would be called ‘Dino’.

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Ferrari to launch new entry level vehicle in October

Ferrari to launch new entry level vehicle in October

Some of you already call it Dino, some of you call it F250 and some of you may not have a clue how the new Ferrari vehicle will be named but one thing is for sure: the prancing horse will be launching an entry level vehicle in October at the Paris Auto Show. Sources confirmed the existence of a V6 under the hood because this engine is currently the cheapest solution.

So far the Italian automaker did not reveal any clue about the new car, spy photographers didn’t make any picture and for the moment nobody knows how the baby Ferrari will look like, so TopSpeed designer had to work with its own imagination and create the rendering above. Let us know if you like it.

If you are already reaching your pocket to buy this new marvel, don’t expect it to come cheap. The new model will not compete against the Aston Martin V8 not the Maserati GranTurismo, so expect a price starting in the $150k (between the F430 and F599). As Ferrari said earlier, if you want to buy a cheap Ferrari, you will have to buy a used Ferrari.

Let’s see if this is the truth or just another marketing plot to keep sales of the F430 going until the new cheaper model arrives.

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Ferrari "Dino" to be unveiled at the Paris Motor Show

Ferrari "Dino" to be unveiled at the Paris Motor Show

Ferrari confirmed that they will launch a new sports car in September at the Paris Motor Show. The future sports car is actually the long-rumored Dino, but it might not get this name, but possibly GT420 or GT470. Dino was the name applied to a smaller sportscar engineered by Ferrari in the 1960s, one named for a son of founder Enzo Ferrari.

The future model will be based on a shortened platform spun from the Maserati GranTurismo. Powered by the family V-8 also found in the Maserati, the Ferrari will sport a 4.7-liter version. The new Ferrari will be positioned between the F430 and the Maserati GT.

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Future "baby" Ferrari will make its world debut in Paris

Future "baby" Ferrari will make its world debut in Paris

Despite Ferrari’s denials, spy photographers already caught test-mules of the upcoming "baby" Ferrari. Powered by a V8 engine, the future model will be the most affordable model Ferrari ever did. With a price tag of about $170.000, Dino will compete with models like Porsche 911 Turbo, Audi R8 and Lamborghini Gallardo. The new 2+2 Coupe will be unveiled at the 2008 Paris Motor Show.

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Ferrari Dino to be launched at the 2008 Geneva Motor Show

Ferrari Dino to be launched at the 2008 Geneva Motor Show

We know Ferrari said over and over again that where won’t be any Dino in the future, but they were just denying the obvious: the Dino will happen and will happen pretty soon: at the 2008 Geneva Motor Show in March.

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2009 Ferrari Dino

2009 Ferrari Dino

Despite Ferrari’s denials, spy photographers already caught test-mules of the upcoming Dino. Powered by a V8 engine, Dino will be the most affordable model Ferrari ever did. With a price tag of about $170.000, Dino will compete with models like Porsche 911 Turbo, Audi R8 and Lamborghini Gallardo. The new 2+2 Coupe will be unveiled at the 2008 Paris Motor Show or at the 2009 Detroit Auto Show.

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Ferrari Dino details

Ferrari Dino details

The car that Ferrari denies it will build will debut in 2009. The long rumored V-8 Ferrari “Dino” will be a front-engine coupe. Between 3,500 and 5,000 will be produced annually, with prices in the range of $160,000 to $180,000. Horsepower is expected to be slightly under 500, with 480 hp quoted by some. Whether there will be a cabriolet version is not known, but could be expected at some point after introduction of the coupe.
The first Ferrari Dino was produced between 1968 and 1976. (...)

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1968 - 1969 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

1968 - 1969 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

In 1968, Ferrari had been on the market as a road car manufacturer for 21 years and was already enjoying massive success. It had already won the Formula One championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans and launched iconic cars like the 250 GTO, 275 GTB, and the 400 Superamerica. However, the cars were very expensive, and Ferrari was looking for a shot at the more affordable sports car market. And it created the Dino for this exact purpose.

Launched in 1968, the first Dino was called the 206 GT. Powered by a 2.0-liter V-6, it was designed by Pininfarina’s Leonardo Fioravanti and produced until 1969. The Dino was updated in 1969 and renamed the 246 GT. A convertible model called the GTS was also introduced. The original Dino was phased out in 1974, but a redesigned model called the 308 GT4 was launched in 1973 and kept into production until 1980. That’s when the Dino brand was dropped altogether, and Ferrari’s next affordable sports car was called the Mondial.

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No Dino

No Dino

Despite rampant rumors that there will be a new Ferrari “Dino,” a car less expensive that the main line Ferrari, the company is categorically denying that it will introduce such a car.
Ferrari’s chairman, Luca di Montezomolo, has denied that Ferrari is building a cheaper model. According to di Montezomolo, Ferrari has neither the desire nor a reason to produce a less expensive vehicle. It sells every car that it can currently build, at premium prices. It is not a volume manufacturer and has (...)

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2007 Ferrari Dino Concept design

2007 Ferrari Dino Concept design

2007 Ferrari Dino Concept is a modern interprtation of the successful Ferrari Dino produced by Ferrari. "The goal was to create a car that feels stylish, modern, dynamic and organic while staying true to the original design language of the Ferrari Dino and Ferrari brand in general."
The Dino Concept is a modern interpretation of the origianl Dino and is in the same time both retro and modern. With the right proportions combined, the car looks very dynamic and stylish. It stays true to its (...)

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Latest spy shots:

Ferrari Dino - to be or not to be?

Ferrari Dino - to be or not to be?

A few days ago we reported that there won’t be a Ferrari Dino after all, but images of the model are still surfacing the internet. The latest one are from Poblete. Dino represents territory absolutely never explored by Ferrari and a couple of key levels and even old Enzo’s legs must be shaking outof sheer nerves in the Great Hereafter. The new Dino will go on sale in late 2009, or maybe 2010.
Also, they say that unlike the classis original, the newcomer wil get a front-mounted 4.2 liter V8 (...)

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1967 - 1980 Ferrari Dino

1967 - 1980 Ferrari Dino

In the late 1960’s through the 1970’s Ferrari produced the Dino series - the 206, 246 and 308, for a total of approximately 7,750 Dinos.
Enzo Ferrari use the name in honour of his only son,Alfredo Dino Ferrari who died in 1956 from muscular dystrophy.

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Ferrari Dino - more info

Ferrari Dino - more info

Ferrari is keep deniing that a project named Dino even exist, but despite this denials a two-seater will be lauched as a main competitor for Porsche 911. And the new model is early stage of development in partnership with Maserati, but we won’t see it on market before 2009.
There are rumors that the new Dino (photo by Autobild) was designed by Pininfarina with input from former Ferrari design boss Frank Stephenson, who now heads Fiat’s Centro Stile operation.
The entry-level Ferrari is a (...)

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Future models from Ferrari

Future models from Ferrari

Have you ever wonder about the Ferrari’s future? If you did, when we might help giving you an idea about the new models coming from Ferrari. Three of them are the new Enzo, a new F430 and the new Dino.
Powered by the FXX’s engine, the new Enzo will use have the same body structure as the F360 Modena and F430. The design will be made by Jason Castriota from Pininfarina. The engine, a 12 cylinders will have a maximum output of 850 hp at 9500-10000 rpm.
The new F430 will be powered by a 5.5 (...)

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More info about the new Ferrari Dino

More info about the new Ferrari Dino

As you might know allready Ferrari is building a small supercar in order to compete with models like Porsche 911 and Aston Martin V8 Vantage. The new model, called "Dino", will be priced under $150000.
First there were rumors that the new Ferrari will be a 2+2 seater, but as you can see from the cover of the latest issue of Germany’s Autobild magazine it will be a 2 seater.
The new Dino will be powered by a 4.2 liter V8 engine and it is set to go on sale in (...)

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