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Ferrari F50

Ferrari F50 Generations:

1995 - 1997 Ferrari F50

1995 - 1997 Ferrari F50
- image 793595
  • Ferrari F50
  • Year:
    1995- 1997
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    V12
  • Transmission:
    6-Speed Manual
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    514 @ 8500
  • MPG(Cty):
    8 (Est.)
  • MPG(Hwy):
    15 (Est.)
  • Torque @ RPM:
    347 @ 6500
  • Displacement:
    4.7 L
  • 0-60 time:
    3.7 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    201 mph
  • Layout:
    Mid-engine, Rear-drive
  • Price:
    480000
  • car segment:
  • body style:

The Ferrari F50 is by far the least popular of the firm’s first four generations of modern hypercars. All the world’s respect and awe for the F40 met the F50 at its debut, but the tide quickly turned for this $480,000 machine after reviewers and Ferrari customers alike revealed the F40 replacement’s familiar styling hid dynamics and a driver experience nowhere near the ferocity of the legendary original.

Instead of a peaky and violent Group B reject like the F40, the F50 was a heavy, high-speed missile with limited tractability at low speeds from the V-12 versus the explosive F40’s twin turbochargers and short gearing.

Make no mistake, there is nothing wrong with the performance of the F50, which easily spanked [the hottest thing available from Lamborghini at the time, the Diablo VT in sprint pace, as well as maximum velocity. The construction is carbon-fiber with the rigidity of a fortified bunker, the rear wing is eye-catching, and the 1990s makeover of the F40’s simple nose was beautiful, at first.

The F50 largely included the F40’s exaggerated and exotic proportions and clamshell hoods front and back. Headlamps above the bumper and hood’s leading edge were possible via shrouded enclosures for the first time in three decades, and the unadorned intake wears only a simple and modest prancing horse.

The F50 is an enjoyable case study for armchair experts and everyone else forced to endure Ferrari’s frequent grandstanding. It also shows a few nice things for all supercar fans, especially those who are, unfortunately, not debating which Ferrari to purchase (at least not any time soon)!

Click past the jump for the full debrief of the Ferrari F50: the Ferrari’s hypercar sophomore album that is now a study in what *not* to do when replacing a legend.

 

Latest Ferrari F50 news and reviews:

1996 Ferrari F50 GT

1996 Ferrari F50 GT

In 1984, Ferrari took the world by surprise when it revived the iconic GTO nameplate with a V-8-powered sports car. Developed as a homologation special based on the 308 GTB, the 288 GTO ultimately became Ferrari’s range-topping model between 1984 and 1987, and unlike its predecessor, it carried a twin-turbo V-8 behind the seats instead of a naturally aspirated V-12. The V-8 legacy continued with the mind-boggling F40 between 1987 and the mid-1990s, but Maranello went back to the high-revving V-12 with the F50 in 1995.

Significantly more exclusive than the F40, the F50 was built in only 349 units over two years and hit the streets with a 4.7-liter V-12 under the hood. The powerplant was based on the 333 SP’s, a race car built by Dallara that marked Ferrari’s official return to sports car racing after a 20-year absence in 1994.

But despite using a racing engine, the F50 never made it onto the track. While Ferrari developed a race-spec version to replace the F40 LM and Evoluzione, the project was cancelled as the Italians were unhappy with the FIA having allowed homologation specials such as the Porsche 911 GT1 join the BPR Global GT Series. The said race car was called the F50 GT and continued its life as a very exclusive road-legal vehicle sold to select customers. A sad yet interesting story, more of which you’ll find out in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari F50 GT.

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Collection Of Eight Ferraris Worth More Than $11 Million Heading To Auction

Collection Of Eight Ferraris Worth More Than $11 Million Heading To Auction

Collecting classic vehicles is quite an expensive hobby if you fancy exotic sports cars, but nothing can drain your multi-million-dollar bank account quicker than a Ferrari collection. As a renowned Ferrari collector and long-time customer, Tony Shooshani knows this better than anyone else, having amassed a Prancing Horse stable that includes some of the rarest models ever built. After years of buying them, Shooshani has now decided to part with eight of his Ferraris, all of which will be auctioned by Gooding & Company at its annual two-day Scottsdale Auctions between January 29-30, 2016.

If you were planning to start your own Ferrari collection, now is as good a time as any. Given you have at least $11 million to spare, that is!

The lot includes some of finest Ferrari supercars ever produced, as well as a couple of classic entry-level models that can still be had for less than one million bucks. The most expensive units are a 1995 F50 and a 2003 Enzo, which are estimated to fetch more than $2.5 million each. There is also a 1990 F40 that Gooding & Company estimates will fetch between $1.3 and 1.6 million.

Classic models include a 250 GT Cabriolet and a 250 GT Lusso, which, not surprisingly, are likely to change owners for more than $2 million. At the more affordable end of the list, there’s a 1969 Dino 206 GT ($700,000-$800,000), a 1984 512 BBi ($400,000-$475,000), and a 1988 328 GTS ($125,000-$150,000).

All told, the estimated value of the entire lot sits between $11.6 and $13.5 million. That’s a lot of dough if you’re not familiar with how much classic Ferraris fetch nowadays, but not that much considering that a 250 GTO can change owners for as much as $50 million.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Four Ferraris Brought To Fiorano For Dario Benuzzi: Video

Four Ferraris Brought To Fiorano For Dario Benuzzi: Video

Since joining Ferrari as a mechanic in 1969, and later becoming chief test driver under Enzo Ferrari himself, Dario Benuzzi has shaped the dynamics and handling characteristics of every model that has left the Maranello factory gates. Except for the 348, which he was unable to sign-off on because of a broken hand. Several years later Ferrari boss Luca di Montezemolo called it one of the worst Ferraris ever built. Probably not a coincidence.

But, these four are definitely not among the worst Ferraris ever built. The company recently sent its legendary test driver out on the Fiorano circuit to sample the F40, F50, Enzo and LaFerrari (we would have thrown in a 288 GTO as well, but we won’t get picky), all cars he had a hand in creating. Now almost 70 years old, Benuzzi loves his job as much as ever. He’s also still one of the coolest human beings on the planet and doesn’t seem to have lost any pace behind the wheel.

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Video: A LaFerrari Delivery Made In Style

Video: A LaFerrari Delivery Made In Style

British property magnate Jon Hunt is nuts about his Ferraris, which makes him one of the few people in the world who has the capability to love the cars and then buy them afterwards. He also just recently accepted the delivery of his latest purchase, the Ferrari LaFerrari.

But simply taking the keys from a dealership wasn’t memorable enough for Hunt. So he decided to do something different. With the help of his two children and some friends, Hunt led his own version of a Ferrari parade, that is if you consider the distance from London to Ferrari headquarters in Maranello as a parade.

It seems like one, seeing as the cars Hunt picked to go pick up the LaFerrari were some of the most exclusive and sought-after Ferraris in the world. Really, it doesn’t get any better than a 288 GTO, an F40, an F50, and an Enzo, does it?

After spending his first five minutes inside the LaFerrari, Hunt quickly lines them all up together and tells Ferrari.com (via the above video) that he’s the type who actually drives his Ferraris, even admitting that he’s done 16,000 kilometers on the Enzo alone.

For somebody who has just about every exclusive Ferrari in the past 20-something years, Jon Hunt has shown us what it really means to be a proud and dedicated tifosi.

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1995 - 1997 Ferrari F50

1995 - 1997 Ferrari F50

The Ferrari F50 is by far the least popular of the firm’s first four generations of modern hypercars. All the world’s respect and awe for the F40 met the F50 at its debut, but the tide quickly turned for this $480,000 machine after reviewers and Ferrari customers alike revealed the F40 replacement’s familiar styling hid dynamics and a driver experience nowhere near the ferocity of the legendary original.

Instead of a peaky and violent Group B reject like the F40, the F50 was a heavy, high-speed missile with limited tractability at low speeds from the V-12 versus the explosive F40’s twin turbochargers and short gearing.

Make no mistake, there is nothing wrong with the performance of the F50, which easily spanked [the hottest thing available from Lamborghini at the time, the Diablo VT in sprint pace, as well as maximum velocity. The construction is carbon-fiber with the rigidity of a fortified bunker, the rear wing is eye-catching, and the 1990s makeover of the F40’s simple nose was beautiful, at first.

The F50 largely included the F40’s exaggerated and exotic proportions and clamshell hoods front and back. Headlamps above the bumper and hood’s leading edge were possible via shrouded enclosures for the first time in three decades, and the unadorned intake wears only a simple and modest prancing horse.

The F50 is an enjoyable case study for armchair experts and everyone else forced to endure Ferrari’s frequent grandstanding. It also shows a few nice things for all supercar fans, especially those who are, unfortunately, not debating which Ferrari to purchase (at least not any time soon)!

Click past the jump for the full debrief of the Ferrari F50: the Ferrari’s hypercar sophomore album that is now a study in what *not* to do when replacing a legend.

Read more
Video: Chris Harris Puts Ferrari F40 Against the F50

Video: Chris Harris Puts Ferrari F40 Against the F50

The Ferrari F40 and the F50 are the two models that preceded the famous Enzo supercar, and they lived very different lives. Most car nuts consider the F40 one of the greatest supercars ever built, whereas the F50 — the F40’s successor — was not nearly as well respected because it was not nearly the car that the F40 was. Allow us to be the first to tell you that this old thought is complete hogwash, and we’ll tell you why.

The F40 and F50 were on the cusp of supercars heading into a plusher realm, where leather seating, clean finishes and features were starting to become a concern for buyers. The F40 so happened to remain on the balls-to-the-wall side of the fence, and the F50 fell on the more refined side. Don’t get us wrong, the F50 was no slouch, with its 513-horsepower, V-12 engine behind the seats, but its extra heft and relative lack of low-end torque kept it from being the driver’s car that the 471-horsepower F40 was.

Now, you don’t have to take our word for it, we’ll let respected, educated and somewhat insane Chris Harris take you on a quick tour of both cars. Judging by the glee in his voice, he was rather pleased by both models...

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The Perfect Father's Day Gift: $6 Million Worth of Ferraris

The Perfect Father’s Day Gift: $6 Million Worth of Ferraris

With Father’s day getting closer, it might be a good idea to start thinking about what present you are going to buy him. We do know that Father’s Day is more about showing your appreciation, but if you have a secret bank account somewhere that has an extra $6.2 million in it, this collection might be the perfect gift.

It includes three of the greatest Ferrari models ever built: a 1990 F40; a 1995 F50; and a 2003 Enzo. This group of premium Ferraris is only available as a collection, as the seller will not separate them.

For your $6.2 million, you will get three supercars with a little over 200 miles on the ticker. The F40 and F50 are painted in Rosso Corsa, while the Enzo gets a very cool Rosso Scuderia exterior paint.

The Enzo is just one of the seven models produced in Rosso Scuderia and one of the only two ever built to US-specs.

Click past the jump to read more about the three models.

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Supercars Unite for a U.K. Bank Holiday

Supercars Unite for a U.K. Bank Holiday

On August 27, 2012, U.K. banks are closed for a holiday and supercars are set to run wild in celebration of this holiday. At the National Motor Museum at Beaulieu, the Supercar Showdown will take place and we will all get a good glimpse and listen to what these cars have to offer.

Some of the cars in this year’s Supercar Showdown include: Jaguar XJ220, Ferrari F40, Ferrari F50, Ferrari 360 Spyder, Lamborghini Gallardo, Mercedes-Benz SLS, Ultima GTR Can-AM, Lightning GT Carbon, Ascari KZ1 GT3 racecar, and Aston Martin GT2. That, of course, is not an exhaustive list of all of this year’s participants, but it gives us a great idea of what to expect.

The guest list also includes a laundry list of car clubs that are sure to bring numerous hot cars to the National Motor Museum. This year, there will be a course set up in the museum’s parking lot, so you can watch these supercars do what they do best, navigate a road course, though we doubt it will be a timed race, but rather a friendly drive.

You also can get involved in the show, as you can vote on the People’s Choice Award for the best supercar at the show. The winner of this award receives a 60th anniversary Beaulieu trophy and tons of bragging rights.

To get into the show, all you need to do is purchase a general Beaulieu attraction admission ticket and you’re good to go. You can get tickets online at the rate of ₤18 for adults, ₤16.65 for those 60 years and older, ₤10.80 for those 13 to 17 years old, and ₤8,95 for those 5 to 12 years old. Alternatively, you can pick up family admission tickets, which are good for two adults and up to three children for just ₤47.25. This ticket also gives you admission to the museum, World of Top Gear, On Screen Cars, Beaulieu Abbey, and Palace House and Garden.

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Video: Ferrari F50 sparks flames from exhaust

Video: Ferrari F50 sparks flames from exhaust

Flame-throwing supercars are grabbing more and more attention these days so it doesn’t really surprise us that another one was captured on video putting on a flame-spewing show.

This time, it’s a Ferrari F50 romping through a California highway and in the middle of its cruising, begins spewing flames as soon as the owner pushes the pedal to the medal. It’s always a treat for us to watch how some owners use their supercars and make them do something our cars can never do – unless of course we set them on fire.

If you haven’t seen a car spew flames from the exhaust before, here’s your chance. It’s not as elaborate as a the one you see in the Batmobile, but its close enough.

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1995 Ferrari F50 supercar up for auction at $788,888

1995 Ferrari F50 supercar up for auction at $788,888

Anybody have $800,000 to spare?

If you’re one of the few that actually do have $800,000 that you can part with without any second thoughts, then this 1995 Ferrari F50, which is being sold by its owner for around $788,888, is one item that you could actually buy. Sure, it might be 15 years old, but how many Ferrari F50s do you actually see romping around the streets these days? We’re thinking not a lot. And it’s not like this one has been used and abused by the owner. On the contrary, it’s got some pretty new and nifty modifications on it including an iPod stereo-system and subwoofers.

On top of that, it’s got some suave Alcantara leather seats, a set of black rims, calipers with red logos, an Italian flag striping on the wing and a Tubi exhaust system. Best of all, for a car that’s been around the block quite a few times; it’s got a surprisingly low mileage of just a shade under 7,500 miles.
So there you have it folks. A 1995 Ferrari F50 for three-quarters of a million. Any takers?

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FBI agent wrecks Ferrari F50

FBI agent wrecks Ferrari F50

Apparently even an entity as powerful as the Federal Burrow of Investigation can’t handle the awesome potential of the Ferrari F50. This beautiful red 500 V2 powered Italian super car was being transported to a storage facility after being seized in a recent drug raid by an FBI agent. The driver claims to have been traveling at 40 MPH when the vehicle suffered a sudden blowout, causing the agent to lose control of the vehicle and smash the $550,000 super car into a tree. Although the FBI guy walked away unharmed, the F50 suffered significant damage.

Personally, I find the whole tire exploding at 40 MPH thing to be a little far fetched. So U.S. government, next time you want to take away someone’s 500 HP Italian super car, give me a call, and I will be more than happy to make sure it ends up where it needs to be safely.

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Video: Ferrari F50 Drifting


The Ferrari F50 doesn’t get a whole lot of respect in the super exotic Ferrari circles. It was rumored to be no faster than the F40 it replaced, and its replacement, the Enzo, may already have its replacement on the way. So what better way to get this car a little cred than show is got some drift chops?

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Ferrari F50 crashed

Ferrari F50 crashed

We are always sorry to report about a crashed supercar. And this time more than ever: we are talking about a 1995 Ferrari F50 owned by a museum in Frank Hoek, South Africa.

The son of the owner of the museum decided to take the F50 to a ride. And the result... well it needs no comment the picture say it all. South African media said the car is a total loss, but the owner of the museum denies this. According to him, the F50 cand still be repaired and return to old state.

Hard to believe considering almost all the essential components are shielded: body, the left rear suspension and the right front suspension, the oil coolers and radiator, three rims and tires must be replaced.

But there is always hope. We have to say that the carbon fiber body will have a high cost, because carbon fiber is extremely expensive and thus restore too.

The accident was not caused by the owner or it reckless driving or excessive speed, but it was described as a ’normal’ accident. I wonder what does this mean?

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Ferrari F50 crashed

The Ferrari F50 was limited to only 349 units. And the result of this crash is one F50 less on the streets of the world. Go to minute 4:00 to see the crash.

If you can find any explanation as of HOW the car end up into the ditch, let us know. We are still wondering here!

For the ignorant, the Ferrari F50 is powered by a naturally aspirated 4.7 liter V12 engine that delivers 513 at 8500. It makes the 0 -60 mph sprint in 3.7 seconds and can hit a top speed of 202 mph.

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1996 - 1997 Ferrari F50

1996 - 1997 Ferrari F50

In its early days, over 50 years ago, Ferrari built cars which could be used, with only a few minor alterations, for Formula 1 or Sportscar events or everyday on the street. However, as Formula 1 cars evolved, it became impossible for someone who was not a team driver or a collector capable of passing a series of private tests on the track, to take the wheel of a racing Ferrari. Ferrari decided to again give all its clients the chance for this experience. The F50 was the response to this technological challenge. Thanks to the research made possible by Ferrari’s vast experience in this field, producing over 45 racing models and over 120 GT and Sports models, the F50 was built to the same tolerances and with the same integrity as a Formula 1 car. The carbonfiber monocoque that enclosed the aeronautical rubber fuel tank, the V12 engine that acted as a load-bearing structure for the transaxle-rear suspension assembly, the pushrod suspension, and separate hand-braking system are formed on the basic principles of a racing car projected into the dimension of normal, safe use in all situations. The result was a car with a specific power output of 109 HP/litre and an extraordinary chassis that combined unbeatable performance with exact handling and ultimate safety even in unexpected or extraordinary circumstances.

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