Cars Ferrari Ferrari Mondial

1980 - 1982 Ferrari Mondial 8

1980 - 1982 Ferrari Mondial 8
- image 678040
  • Ferrari Mondial 8
  • Year:
    1980- 1982
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    V8
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    214
  • Torque @ RPM:
    181
  • Displacement:
    2.9 L
  • 0-60 time:
    9.4 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    143 mph
  • car segment:
  • Purpose:
  • body style:

The most affordable Ferrari ever built

In the late 1970s, Ferrari began working on a replacement for the 308 GT4 and 208 GT4 that would be more usable and blend the practicality of four seats with the performance of a Maranello-made "Prancing Horse." The result was the Mondial, which was launched at the 1980 Geneva Auto Salon. It was the first Ferrari to depart from the company’s familiar three-digit naming scheme and its name was inspired by the 500 Mondial race car of the early 1950s.

Much like most Ferraris launched in the 1980s, the Mondial received several updates until it was discontinued in 1993. The first iteration was dubbed Mondial 8 and was sold for roughly three years, between 1980 and 1982. Production ended at 703 units, about 12-percent of the total Mondial run in 13 years.

Intended to serve as the touring car model within the Ferrari lineup, the Mondial 8 was received with much criticism for its styling and performance. The design was considered too bland for a Ferrari, while the large black-colored bumpers installed due to safety requirements made it look awkward compared to previous grand tourers. The Mondial 8 was also considered underpowered and slow, and although it wasn’t necessarily the case, it was the intense criticism that prompted Ferrari to update it for 1983.

More than three decades have passed since the Mondial was introduced to the world and the four-seater continues to be one of the most controversial Ferraris in history. Keep reading to find out why.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Mondial 8.

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1980 - 1982 Ferrari Mondial 8

1980 - 1982 Ferrari Mondial 8

The most affordable Ferrari ever built

In the late 1970s, Ferrari began working on a replacement for the 308 GT4 and 208 GT4 that would be more usable and blend the practicality of four seats with the performance of a Maranello-made "Prancing Horse." The result was the Mondial, which was launched at the 1980 Geneva Auto Salon. It was the first Ferrari to depart from the company’s familiar three-digit naming scheme and its name was inspired by the 500 Mondial race car of the early 1950s.

Much like most Ferraris launched in the 1980s, the Mondial received several updates until it was discontinued in 1993. The first iteration was dubbed Mondial 8 and was sold for roughly three years, between 1980 and 1982. Production ended at 703 units, about 12-percent of the total Mondial run in 13 years.

Intended to serve as the touring car model within the Ferrari lineup, the Mondial 8 was received with much criticism for its styling and performance. The design was considered too bland for a Ferrari, while the large black-colored bumpers installed due to safety requirements made it look awkward compared to previous grand tourers. The Mondial 8 was also considered underpowered and slow, and although it wasn’t necessarily the case, it was the intense criticism that prompted Ferrari to update it for 1983.

More than three decades have passed since the Mondial was introduced to the world and the four-seater continues to be one of the most controversial Ferraris in history. Keep reading to find out why.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Mondial 8.

Read more
Drive Showcases the Ferrari Mondial: Video

Drive Showcases the Ferrari Mondial: Video

Ferrari expert John Pogson explains why the highly criticized Mondial is actually a cool car

Introduced in 1980 as a replacement for the 308 GT4 and 208 GT4, the Ferrari Mondial was conceived as a Prancing Horse that brought together the practicality of four seats and the performance of a Maranello-made vehicle. It was also the last mid-engined four-seater to come from Maranello. However, the Mondial remained famous for different reasons. The grand tourer was heavily criticized for its bland exterior design and somewhat poor performance, often being labeled as the worst Ferrari ever built.

But the folks over at Drive don’t agree, and they’ve put together a cool nine-minute video to prove that the Mondial is a sports car we should hate. And, they brought in John Pogson, a trained Ferrari mechanic and the main man behind Italia Autosport, to make a case for the four-seater.

Pogson, who owns a silver Mondial with a Burgundy interior, talks about how the unusual-looking Ferrari draws a lot of attention, yet it doesn’t intimidate people to the extent a red, flashier Prancing Horse would. So, while it’s not as fancy as an F40 or a Testarossa, it makes for a good conversation topic with other Ferrari enthusiasts, which is basically what a true classic is all about. He also goes on to say that you don’t need to spend £200,000 to own a cool car and that the Mondial, which can be purchased for well under £30,000, is the perfect example.

I don’t know about you, but I agree with the man, especially because the Mondial is the most affordable way to become a Ferrari owner. Sure, it may be slower than a Lamborghini Jalpa, but it provides seating for four and it has plenty of luggage room, making it a perfect family Sunday car. And despite not being as quick as an F40, it has a throaty exhaust note and enough horsepower for a fun afternoon on a twisty road. Hit play to see the whole video and learn why Pogson loves his Mondial QV so much.

And if you want to learn more about the car, you can check out our full review here.

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1954 Ferrari 500 Mondial Spyder PF Owned By Porfirio Rubirosa Restored By Ferrari Classiche Department

1954 Ferrari 500 Mondial Spyder PF Owned By Porfirio Rubirosa Restored By Ferrari Classiche Department

If you’ve got an old Ferrari that you want to restore, but you want to be absolutely certain that its done in a way that significantly improves the value, then you’ll be dealing with Ferrari Classiche in one way or another. The classic car division of the Italian automaker will certify third-party restorations as being historically accurate, but you also have the option to simply bring the car directly to the experts themselves. That’s what the owner of this 1954 500 Mondial Spyder PF did, and Ferrari Classiche has just announced that the restoration is complete.

The owner’s goal is to enter the car in the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it will compete for status with some of the finest classic cars in the world. The car was first owned by Porfirio Rubirosa, the Dominican diplomat. He was also a racing driver, although Ferrari’s press release seems more concerned with his sex life (to be fair, it’s what most people talk about with him, and he was married five times). It was owned by a couple of other racers before it was retired and even won a few races.

Continue reading to learn more about this story.

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Forza Horizon 2 Gets G-Shock Car Pack

Forza Horizon 2 Gets G-Shock Car Pack

If you got a new Xbox One for the holidays, or you picked up a copy of Forza Horizon 2, Microsoft has a present for you. A new DLC pack of cars titled the G-Shock Car Pack is now available, and it might be one of my favorite packs yet. The pack comes with six cars for $5, and like all good Forza updates it has a nice selection of cars for various types of racing. There are two bargain performance cars from the modern era with the Mazdaspeed 3 and Nissan’s IDx Nismo concept, and there are a pair of off-road warriors with the SVT Raptor Shelby and the 1975 Ford Bronco. The last two cars are special in their own way, and they are both considered cult classics: the Subaru Brat GL and the 1953 Ferrari 500 Mondial.

What makes this pack so great for me is the sheer collection of wildly different cars. The Mondial is one of the few four-cylinder Ferraris ever made and the Nissan IDx Nismo is one of the most interesting concept cars to show up in years. I also love the wild insanity that is driving the Subaru Brat and the Ford Bronco across the European countryside in Forza Horizon 2.

Like all previous car packs, this is only available for the Xbox One version. It is available right now.

Click past the jump to read more about Forza Horizon 2’s new G-Shock Car Pack.

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1985 - 1989 Ferrari 3.2 Mondial Cabriolet

1985 - 1989 Ferrari 3.2 Mondial Cabriolet

In 1985 at the Frankfurt Motor Show, Ferrari added the fourth model in the Mondial line-up: the 3.2 Mondial (after Mondial 8, Mondial Cabriolet and Mondial Quattrovalvole). Available in both coupe and convertible versions, the 3.2 Mondial stood into production until 1989 with 810 units, in both right and left hand drive configurations, together with various world market specifications.

The 3.2 in the model title referred purely to the cubic capacity of the engine in liters. This model saw the first change in the body styling, with revised front and rear ends incorporating smooth body color bumper assemblies, and a radiator grille with front lights.

The hood on the cabriolet continued with the same design theme of its predecessor, echoing the shape of the coupe’s buttresses at the rear.

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1989 - 1993 Ferrari Mondial T

1989 - 1993 Ferrari Mondial T

The last of the Mondial series was revealed in 1989. Called Mondial T it was the most heavily revised Mondial, with letter "T" inspired by the F1 312 T single-seater, which had just won the Formula 1 World Championship and also used the longitudinal engine/transverse gearbox layout: the previously-transverse engine was now mounted longitudinally whilst the gearbox remained transverse, thus forming a ’t’.

Production last between 1983 to 1993, with 858 units produced in both right and left hand drive configurations, together with various world market specification models.

The new Mondial T was finally worthing the "Ferrari" name and was able to compete with supercars such as the BMW 850i, Chevrolet Corvette, Honda NSX, Lotus Esprit and Porsche 911 Carrera.

Besides using a longitudinal engine/transverse gearbox layout, Mondial T was also offering for the first time: power assisted steering, and had a 3-position electronically controlled suspension for a variable trade off between ride quality and road holding. It also had standard ABS.

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1985 - 1989 Ferrari 3.2 Mondial

1985 - 1989 Ferrari 3.2 Mondial

The third model in the Mondial line-up was the 3.2 Mondial unveiled in 1985 at the Frankfurt Salon. It was called 3.2 as a reference to the cubic capacity of the engine in liters. The car remained into production until 1989, with a total of 987 units produced, with both right and left hand drive available, together with various world market specification models.

This model saw the first change in the body styling: restyled and body-coloured bumpers, similar to the 328 with more integrated indicators & driving lamps, and new wheels with a more rounded face. The body shape remained otherwise unaltered from its predecessor, although once again the interior detailing was revamped, the most noticeable being angled top corners to the instrument nacelle.

A leather dashboard and/or headlining was available as an option. The five spoke road wheel pattern changed from a flat spoke design to a convex spoke layout to accommodate negative offset suspension geometry for the optional ABS braking system, which would eventually become standard equipment.

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1989 - 1993 Ferrari Mondial T Cabriolet

1989 - 1993 Ferrari Mondial T Cabriolet

In 1989, at the same time as the coupe version, Ferrari also revealed the Cabriolet version of the Mondial T, the fourth and last model in the Mondial line-up. Like tis coupe brother, the T Cabriolet stayed into production until 1993, with 1017 units produced, in both right and left hand drive versions, together with various world market specification models.

The engine capacity increased to 3.4 liters (up from 3.2 liters in the Mondial 3.2) and it became longitudinally mounted, instead of transversely on the previous models. It was coupled to a transverse gearbox, hence the letter "t" in the model designation, and had an ABS braking system as standard equipment, whilst the front and rear tracks increased by 2mm and 50mm respectively.

The new T model was visually different from preceding Mondial models, the most recognizable being the redesign of the air intakes to a smaller, neater rectangular shape. The door-handles were of a visually different design and, along with the bumpers, became body colored, whilst a painted black band was added around the bottom of the body.

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1983 - 1985 Ferrari Mondial Cabriolet

1983 - 1985 Ferrari Mondial Cabriolet

In September 1983 Ferrari previewed a convertible version of the Mondial Quattrovalvole, the drop top four valver was soon followed up with a production version in January 1984 at the Brussels Salon. This model was aimed specifically at the sunny climates of the American west coast, but European models were also produced. The Mondial Cabriolet stayed into production until 1985, during which time 629 examples were produced, in both right and left hand drive versions.

The exterior design was the same as for the Mondial Quattrovalvole coupe version: same wedge body shape with the radiator grille beneath the front bumper. Apart from the folding canvas roof, the overall shape was identical to the sister model, including the black plastic wrap around bumpers front and rear, together with the large trapezoidal air intake grilles for the engine bay on the body sides behind the doors, and paired circular rear light assemblies, with Mondial Cabriolet badging to the tail panel.

It featured the same extended center console with the ventilation controls incorporated into it, and the radio forward of the gear change as the coupe. Similarly the door panels and steering wheel were identical to the coupe version. The rear seats of the cabriolet were closer together than on the coupe, to allow for stowage of the hood assembly, and the headrests were omitted. The hood was provided with a matching canvas cover when in the lowered position, with a leather cover available as an option.

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1982 - 1985 Ferrari Mondial Quattrovalvole

1982 - 1985 Ferrari Mondial Quattrovalvole

In 1982 at the Geneva Auto Show, Ferrari replaced the Mondial 8 with an even more powerful version, the Mondial Quattrovalvole. The "Quattrovalvole" name referred to the 4 (quattro) valve per cylinder engine that increased the engine power, but also made it easier to comply with US emissions legislation. The car was produced between 1982 and 1985, during which time 1145 examples were produced, in both right and left hand drive versions, together with various world market specification models.

The Mondial Quattrovalvole featured a wedge body shape theme with the radiator grille beneath the front bumper. The overall shape was identical to the preceding model, including the black plastic wrap around bumpers front and rear, together with the large trapezoidal air intake grilles for the engine bay on the body sides behind the doors, and paired circular rear light assemblies.

Although the exterior remained unchanged, apart from the replacement of the Mondial 8 badge with Mondial Quattovalvole badging to the tail panel, the interior was lightly modified, mainly in respect of the center console layout.

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