A genuine four-seater sports car

While the Prancing Horse is best known for its top-shelf performance vehicles and winning racing machines, even Maranello’s finest must occasionally bend to the whims of the passenger vehicle market. But don’t see it as a compromise - rather, it’s best seen as a combination of speed and usability, catapulting the commonplace people mover to the extraordinary realm of apexes and checkered flags. Such is the case with the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2, the brand’s first genuine four-seater model.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE).

Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Exterior Styling

  • Pininfarina design outside
  • Informed by aerodynamics
  • Classic coupe-like proportions, plus a longer trunk
  • 15-inch wheels
  • Larger dimensions than preceding Coupe and Cabriolet
1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Exterior
- image 790370
Outside, the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 rocks a body penned by the legendary Italian design house Pininfarina.

Outside, the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 rocks a body penned by the legendary Italian design house Pininfarina, which drew on its studies into aerodynamics to create the sleek shape we see here.

Up front, the car uses a somewhat shallow, yet wide oval intake, which was located low on the fascia. Behind the surround is a rectangular egg crate-style radiator grille, with a squared mesh to ward off errant bits of terrain while on the move. The various forward-facing lights are all circular and rounded, and include open-style headlights with concave chrome trim rings. There’s also a set of circular turns signals added to the lower corners of the fascia, while the chin line is emphasized thanks to a one-piece chrome-plated bumper. Later in the car’s production cycle, this piece came equipped with rubber bits added to the over-rider bars.

Moving around to the sides, the 250 GT 2+2 comes with a long hood line and short front overhang, while the rear end juts out a long distance from the rear fender. The proportions emphasize the car’s coupe-like roof line, giving it a feeling of momentum and speed as a result. The corners come occupied by 15-inch wheels in a wire-spoke design. Chrome surrounds are added to the windows.

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Exterior
- image 790876
When viewed from the rear, the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 shows off with vertical one-piece taillight clusters, with each side composed of three circular lenses.

When viewed from the rear, the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 shows off with vertical one-piece taillight clusters, with each side composed of three circular lenses. The top lens is a standard red reflector, while the middle is an orange turn signal, and the bottom is a stop lamp. Lower down, you’ll find the standard chrome bumper treatment, once again with rubber-faced over-rider bars. You’ll also notice an elegant curve for the trunk line, while the shoulder line reaches back into the taillight clusters.

Unlike the prototype that drove at Le Mans, this final production version added in a variety of slick details. For example, the cooling louvres in the flanks were new. What’s more, the prototype models have small, oval-shaped indicator lights on the fenders, while the production vehicles have teardrop-shaped indicator lights.

In terms of aesthetics, the earlier 3.0-liter cars and later 4.0-liter cars were nearly identical. However, the 1962 did add a few minor styling updates, including new driving lights which were relocated to the front panel just underneath the headlights, rather than inside the grille as seen before. The lights also got chrome surrounds at this time. The sidelights were moved to a pod further to the outside of the fascia and in the front wings, while the rear taillight cluster became a single unit.

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Exterior
- image 790374
The updated 330 models also got unique badging, with “330” or “330 America” bits added to a select few vehicles.

What’s more, the updated 330 models also got unique badging, with “330” or “330 America” bits added to a select few vehicles.

In term of exterior dimensions, the 250 GT 2+2 measured in with a wheelbase of 2,600 mm (102.4 inch), matching the 250 GT Coupe and Cabriolet models. Although the wheelbase was identical, the 250 GT 2+2 was still quite a bit bigger in all other respects, adding a whopping 300 mm (11.8 inches) in overall length and 60 mm (2.4 inches) in overall width. Additionally, the car was more than 50 mm (2 inches) lower compared to the 250 GT Coupe.

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 Exterior Dimensions
Overall Length 4,700 mm (185 inches)
Overall Width 1,710 mm (67.3 inches)
Overall Height 1,340 mm (52.8 inches)
Wheelbase 2,600 mm (102.4 inches)
Front Track 1,354 mm (53.3 inches)
Rear Track 1,394 mm (54.9 inches)

Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Interior Design

  • Legitimate rear bench provided more room
  • Luxurious touches like full leather upholstery
  • New dash and seats halfway through production
1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Interior
- image 790377
When it was introduced, Ferrari marketed the 250 GT 2+2 as a true luxury car.

When it was introduced, Ferrari marketed the 250 GT 2+2 as a true luxury car, producing both left-hand and right-hand drive iterations for a variety of markets and buyers.

However, unlike previous 2+2 Ferraris, the 250 GT stood out thanks to its legitimate rear seating arrangement. Rather than accommodating children or folding adults into pretzels, the rear bench on the 250 GT 2+2 was actually big enough to comfortably sit full-sized humans without too much issue. To accomplish this, Ferrari moved the front seats forward on their runners, and thus opened up legroom in the rear substantially.

As a luxury car, the 250 GT 2+2 also got loads of premium touches. For example, the cabin came bathed in leather upholstery, and even the rear seats came fully decked out in sumptuous coverings. What’s more, the rear bench offered passengers a central arm rest and an ashtray, both of which were critical items for the day.

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Exterior
- image 790887
The rear bench offered passengers a central arm rest and an ashtray, both of which were critical items for the day.

On the daily-drivability front, the 250 GT 2+2 got very narrow pillars front to back, which helped to enhance outward visibility and add in extra interior lighting as well.

With the car’s update in 1962, Ferrari also freshened the interior design, adding in a new dash and new seats. What’s more, with the addition of the more powerful 4.0-liter engine under the hood, the 250 2+2 could support a bevy of extra features and accessories. As such, buyers could get theirs with air conditioning, if desired.

Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Drivetrain And Performance

Front-engine, RWD
Originally equipped with 3.0-liter V-12 making 240 horsepower
Later equipped with 4.0-liter V-12 making 300 horsepower
Four-speed gearbox with fifth-gear overdrive
Top speed of 143 mph
Independent front suspension
Only 176 pounds heavier than the much smaller Coupe and Cab

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Drivetrain
- image 790874
Unlike preceding 250 models, the GT 2+2 mounted the engine nearly 8 inches forward in the chassis, all in the name of increased cabin space.

Like many of the famous collectible Ferraris of the era, the 250 GT 2+2 utilized a front-engine, RWD drivetrain layout. However, unlike preceding models of the nameplate, this one mounted the engine a full 200 mm (7.9 inches) forward in the chassis, all in the name of increased cabin space.

The engine in question was the automaker’s Tipo 250, a longitudinally mounted 60-degree 3.0-liter V-12. Branded with the engine code 128F, standout details include a single overhead cam per cylinder bank, two valves per cylinder, and wet sump lubrication. The engine also gets 2,953 cc’s of displacement and an 8.8:1 compression ratio, while the bore and stroke come to 73 mm by 58.8 mm.

Making the go juice go boom is an “outside the vee” spark plug setup, while air and fuel are introduced via three twin-choke Weber 36 DCL6 carburetors. The twin-coil distributor ignition is mounted towards the rear of the engine. A 100-liter (26.1-gallon) fuel tank hoards the good stuff.

When new, the 250 GT 2+2 made upwards of 240 horsepower at 7,000 rpm, or roughly 80 horsepower per liter. It also laid down as much as 181 pound-feet of torque at 5,000 rpm. Properly applied at the rear wheels, the car could sprint from 0 to 60 mph in 8 seconds flat, while running from 0 to 100 mph in 22.8 seconds - both pretty impressive numbers for a legit four-seater sports car of the time.

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Drivetrain
- image 790880
When new, the 250 GT 2+2 made upwards of 240 horsepower at 7,000 rpm, or roughly 80 horsepower per liter.

Routing the muscle to the rear is a four-speed synchromesh gearbox, which features an electronically operated fifth gear overdrive. The four-speed was also equipped with a single-plate clutch, while the final drive was routed through a propeller shaft to the rigid rear axle, and offered to customers in two unique ratios.

Flat out, the 250 GT 2+2 could achieve a speed of 230 km/h (143 mph).

Eventually, Ferrari replaced the 250 GT 2+2’s 3.0-liter with a larger, more powerful 4.0-liter V-12 engine, code named the 128E/63. Equipped in the 250 GT 2+2 chassis, Ferrari renamed the vehicle the 330 America.

The 4.0-liter V-12 in the 330 America came with a number of features that made for an improvement to overall output, including 3,967 cc’s of displacement, as well as a 77 mm by 71 mm bore and stroke. Maxed out, the 4.0-liter V-12 could produce as much as 300 horsepower.

Under the skin, the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 was built on a tubular steel frame, with a chassis factory number of 508E. Comparatively speaking, the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 is larger than the 250 GT Coupe and Cabriolet, but the extra metal doesn’t have as profound an effect on overall weight as you might expect. Put on the scales, the 250 GT 2+2 was just 80 kg (176 pounds) heavier than the preceding Coupe and Cab, with a final dry weight of 1,280 kg (2,822 pounds).

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Exterior
- image 790373
Managing the heft is an independent suspension set-up in front, plus a rigid rear axle.

Managing the heft is an independent suspension set-up in front, with unequal-length wishbones, coil springs, telescopic shocks, and an anti-roll bar. Meanwhile, the rear gets a rigid axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs (and later, coil springs), telescopic shock absorbers, and radius arms.

A worm and sector steering turns it all, while in the corners, grip is provided by tires measured at 6.5 inches by 15 inches. There’s also four-wheel disc brakes, a necessary item when considering the power levels in play.

Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Pricing

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Exterior
- image 790881

These days, the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 is considered highly valuable among collectors. The gorgeous Pininfarina body work and rousing front-mounted V-12 powerplant up the car’s desirability considerably, and if you find a decent example at auction, expect to pay upwards of $400,000 to $500,000.

Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Competition

Jaguar E-Type 2+2 Coupe

1961 - 1968 Jaguar E-Type High Resolution Exterior
- image 655671

Upon the E-Type’s release in 1961, Enzo Ferrari was famously quoted as saying it was the most beautiful car in the world. The British icon’s gorgeous styling is still undeniable today, with an extended hood line, rounded cabin, and short overhangs giving it head-turning presence no matter the occasion. Originally offered as a two-seater roadster and fixed-top coupe, Jaguar eventually created a 2+2 iteration with a lengthened wheelbase.

Read our full review of the 1961 - 1968 Jaguar E-Type.

Final Thoughts

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Exterior
- image 790892
It’s important not to write off a new body type as a waste without first digging a bit deeper. The Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 is a great example of that.

As most of the modern sports car makers turn to the ever-popular SUV and crossover segments to generate additional sales (Ferrari included), it’s easy to fall into the trap of decrying anything other than a hardcore two-seater as too frilly and ultimately compromised. Hell, we do it all the time.

That said, it’s important not to write off a new body type as a waste without first digging a bit deeper. The Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 is a great example of that. It brought loads of the good stuff you’d expect from the brand, like speed, jaw-dropping aesthetics, and a V-12 powerplant, but it also had the space in back to justify its claims to 2+2 practicality.

As a result, Ferrari sold nearly 1,00 examples of it. Perhaps that’s a lesson we should all consider for the modern age.

  • Leave it
    • * Not that rare
    • * Faster competition out there
    • * Surprisingly expensive at auction

Further Reading

1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2
- image 790457

Read our full review on the 1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2.

1962 - 1964 Ferrari 250 GTO High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 575363

Read our full review on the 1962 - 1964 Ferrari 250 GTO.

no article
- image 742470

Read more Ferrari news.

The Story Behind The Car

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Exterior
- image 790879
The 250 GT 2+2 was Ferrari’s first-ever true four-seater model, introduced as an attempt to broaden Ferrari’s customer base.

First introduced in 1953, Ferrari’s 250 nameplate was added to a long line of vehicles, including both racing cars and street cars. Other notable Ferrari 250’s include the 250 GTO, the 250 Testa Rossa, and the 250 MM.

However, the 250 GT 2+2 was Ferrari’s first-ever true four-seater model. Introduced as an attempt to broaden Ferrari’s customer base, the 250 GT 2+2 came equipped with a decently sized rear bench, especially when compared to the puny rear benches seen on Ferrari’s past 2+2 models.

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE) Interior
- image 790870

First produced in 1960, the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 didn’t follow tradition by debuting at some major auto show or private event. Rather, Ferrari decided to emphasize the car’s sporting nature by introducing it as the course vehicle at the 1960 24 Hours of Le Mans. The car’s initial debut hit the scene as a prototype vehicle, but the final production version arrived in October of that year at the Paris Motor Show.

During its lifecycle, the 250 GT 2+2 received a few updates, although they were relatively minor, all things considered. Less minor was what Ferrari did under the hood, as the last 50 examples came equipped with a new, larger, more-powerful engine package.

The final example rolled off the assembly line late into 1963, with a total of 957 examples built. As a result, the 250 GT 2+2 became the brand’s first large-scale production four-seater passenger vehicle.

What do you think?
Show Comments
Car Finder: