If only James Bond was Italian...

The 330 GT 2+2 was actually an update to the 330 America that Ferrari built in 1963 only. It also replaced the 250 GT/E 2+2, but it was larger and sportier. Introduced in 1964, the 330 GT 2+2 was upgraded in 1965, when the Series II model with a new design was launched. Production lasted until 1967, with 1,099 examples built until the Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 was introduced as a replacement. The cool thing about these cars is that they’ve remained somewhat affordable compared to other million-dollar Ferraris from the era.

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Exterior

  • Designed by Pininfarina
  • Classic GT layout
  • Quad-headlamp initial series
  • Longer wheelbase
  • Updated in 1965
1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2
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Unlike other Ferraris from the 1960s, the 330 GT 2+2 looked very American thanks to its twin-headlamp layout

Back in the 1960s, Ferrari built mostly grand tourers with V-12 engines. While the 250 series, sold from 1953 to 1964, remains the most iconic, the 330 series that somewhat replaced it also made a big name for itself. Much like its predecessor, the 330 was built in many forms. The 330 America was based on the 250 GT/E, while the 330 GTC shared underpinnings with the 275. The 330 GT 2+2, however, received its very own chassis and body.

Just like any Ferrari from the era, the 330 GT 2+2 was penned by Pininfarina. However, this model was designed by Tom Tjaarda, a Detroit-born designer that joined the Italian firm in 1961. The 330 GT 2+2 was Tjaarda’s first Ferrari design and followed a line of Chevrolet Corvette concepts, as well as work on Fiat and Lancia models. Tjaarda designed his second Ferrari in 1966 when he was appointed to work on the 365 GT California.

Unlike other Ferraris from the 1960s, the 330 GT 2+2 looked very American thanks to its twin-headlamp layout. With seven-inch outer lights and five-inch inner lenses, the grand tourer embraced the dual-headlamp look that was very popular in the U.S. Tjaarda also envisioned smoother, rounder body lines, but kept the front fascia aggressive through a wide grille, round fog lamps, and a full-width chrome bumper.

The 330 GT 2+2 had a two-inch longer wheelbase than its predecessor, but it also gained a longer rear overhang and a longer deck lid. These features, paired with the bigger quarter window and the lowered beltline, made the car look bigger and sleeker. Definitely a fresh take on the usual grand tourer profile with short deck lids and heavily raked roofs.

1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2
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The rear fascia was also a significant departure from previous Ferraris

The rear fascia was also a significant departure from previous Ferraris. While most models from the late 1950s and early 1960 have small, round taillights, the 330 GT 2+2 was designed with rectangular units displaced horizontally. Combined with a trunk lid that extended in front of the fascia and the full-length bumper, it made the 330 GT 2+2 look wider and more elegant.

The designed was altered in mid-1965 when Ferrari ditched the dual-headlamp configuration up front. Instead, it used single round lights on each side, which made the 330 GT 2+2 similar to the 275 GTS, still in production at the time. Maranello also ditched the highly popular Borrani wire wheels, replacing them with ten-hole cast alloy rollers for a sportier look. The wire wheels remained optional. The round foglamps were also swapped for rectangular lights. Onto the sides, the 11-slot fender vent was replaced with the triple-row design of the 250 GT/E and 275 GTS. The rear carried over unchanged, but the Series II had just enough changes to stand out.

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Interior

  • Luxurious cabin
  • Authentic wood
  • Leather upholstery
  • Two-tone layout
1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2
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By far the most eye-catching feature was the massive block of wood mounted in the dashboard

Ferrari interiors were all you could ask for back in the day in terms of luxury. Most cars had genuine wood trim, soft leather, and appealing upholstery layouts that combined light and dark colors for lively contrasts. The 330 GT 2+2 was no exception from this rule, and its cabin was an exotic place to spend time in.

By far the most eye-catching feature was the massive block of wood mounted in the dashboard. The entire unit’s face was made out of wood, with the gauges, the A/C vents, and a few buttons placed in specially carved holes. The glove compartment was also cut out into a big wood piece, with the lid made from the same material. The top of the dash was wrapped in leather, usually black, as was the lower side. Ferrari used leather on the door panels. Options include all-black or all-tan, depending on the upholstery on the seats, or a two-tone layout with black upper and lower sides and pillars and a tan center.

1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2
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The seats came wrapped in leather as standard, and so did the center tunnel and the lower section of the center stack

The seats came wrapped in leather as standard, and so did the center tunnel and the lower section of the center stack. The steering wheel was pretty standard, with three metal spokes mounted in a wooden rim. The center section was also made from metal, as Ferrari had yet to add leather elements to this area until the late 1960s.

The interior carried over almost unchanged in the Series II, but Ferrari did make a few adjustments to the layout of the switchgear and the A/C outlets. Maranello also dropped the floor-mounted pedal box in favor of a suspended unit.

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Performance

  • 4.0-liter V-12
  • Manual transmission
  • 296 horsepower
  • 0 to 60 mph in 6.7 seconds
  • Top speed at 152 mph
1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2
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The 330 GT 2+2 got its juice from an evolution of the 4.0-liter Colombo V-12 engine found in the 400 Superamerica

The body of the 330 GT 2+2 was mounted on a new chassis that had factory reference numbers 571 and 571/65 for the Series I and Series II model, respectively. All were numbered in odd chassis number sequence, from 4963 to 7533 for the Series I and from 7537 to 10193 for the Series II. All cars featured large section oval main tubes with cross bracing and sub-assemblies welded to the main frame to support the body, which was standard Ferrari practice back then.

The 330 GT 2+2 got its juice from an evolution of the 4.0-liter Colombo V-12 engine found in the 400 Superamerica. The single-overhead camshaft unit had an outside vee spark-plug arrangement, a bank of three twin-choke Weber carburetors, a twin coil, and a rear-mounted distribution ignition system.

1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2
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The sprint from 0 to 60 mph took 6.7 seconds

The mill was rated at 296 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque, which was a bit less powerful than other models in production, but quite impressive for the era. The sprint from 0 to 60 mph took 6.7 seconds, while top speed was estimated at around 152 mph.

The engine was coupled to a four-speed, all synchromesh gearbox, with an electronically operated overdrive fifth gear at first. A five-speed was introduced for the Series II model, but Ferrari also fitted a few Series I cars with this unit. With the change from the four- to the five-speed gearbox, the clutch actuation system went from mechanical to hydraulic operation.

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Price

1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2
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Pricing usually starts from a little over $200,000 for well-maintained cars, but a top-notch version with complete documentation can cost more than $400,000

The 330 GT 2+2 was produced in 1,099 units, which makes it one of the most popular Ferraris of the 1960s. While it might not seem like much compared to modern production runs, this car was actually built in great numbers given the company’s capacity back then. As a result, it’s not as expensive as other classic Ferraris, with several models being available for less than $300,000 on the used car market (while 330 GTC models can fetch in excess of $1 million).

Pricing usually starts from a little over $200,000 for well-maintained cars, but top-notch models with complete documentation can cost more than $400,000. For instance, a Series II with original parts, known ownership history, and fully documented by historian Marcel Massini is estimated to fetch between $325,000 and $425,000 at the upcoming RM Sotheby’s Monterey auction in August 2018.

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Competition

Aston Martin DB4

1958 - 1963 Aston Martin DB4 High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
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When the 330 GT 2+2 was launched, Aston Martin was still selling the DB4. Introduced in 1958, the DB4 was already one of the most iconic luxury grand tourers on the road. Although it was a bit long in the tooth, it still had what it took to compete with this Ferrari in terms of styling and amenities. However, it lacked the performance. While the Ferrari has a V-12 with nearly 300 horsepower, the DB4 was powered by a 3.7-liter inline-six that generated "only" 240 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque. As a result, the DB4 was notably slower, needing 9.3 seconds to reach 60 mph from a standing start, to go with a top speed rated at 139 mph.

Read our full review on the 1958 - 1963 Aston Martin DB4.

Aston Martin DB5

1963 - 1967 Aston Martin DB5 Exterior
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In 1963, Aston Martin brought the more modern DB5 into the battle. Sporting a new shell with a more modern design and an updated interior, the DB5 was also more powerful. The old 3.7-liter engine was replaced with a 4.0-liter straight-six that delivered 282 horsepower and 280 pound-feet. While it still was some 15 horsepower below the Ferrari, it had an extra 40 pound-feet of twist. The DB5 was also notably quicker to 60 mph, needing eight seconds to hit the benchmark (still slower than the 330 GT 2+2 though), while top speed increased to 143 mph.

Read our full review on the 1963 - 1967 Aston Martin DB5.

Aston Martin DB6

1965 Aston-Martin DB6
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The British GT was again updated in 1965 when it was renamed the DB6. The drivetrain remained unchanged, but Aston Martin introduced an optional Vantage upgrade that increased output to an impressive 325 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque. While it still wasn’t quicker than the Ferrari, its top speed was rated at an equally amazing 150 mph. Thanks to the James Bond franchise, DB models from the 1960s are far more famous than the 330 GT 2+2, and thus they cost more nowadays, with many examples having been sold for millions of dollars at public auctions.

Conclusion

1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2
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Sure, the 330 GT 2+2 isn’t as famous as some other Ferraris from the 330, America, or the 250 series, but it’s equally exciting design-wise and just as luxurious. Actually, the slightly longer wheelbase makes it a bit more comfortable than other grand tourers, while the V-12 engine is nearly as powerful as the much-praised and sought-after 500 Superfast. The fact that it’s not as expensive as other Ferraris from the era shouldn’t be a turn-off. It’s a great opportunity to buy a classic, exotic grand tourer from Maranello for the price of a 488 GTB. If you think it sounds ludicrous, it’s time to remember that a 250 GTO can fetch in excess of $30 million nowadays.

  • Leave it
    • * Still not affordable for the average Joe
    • * The Aston Martin DB is a cool alternative

Further reading

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